KTA Tator Inc

Pittsburgh, PA, United States

KTA Tator Inc

Pittsburgh, PA, United States

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Helsel J.L.,KTA Tator Inc
Journal of Protective Coatings and Linings | Year: 2014

Proper surface cleaning is one of the most important process in the coating process. The surface preparation should reference recognized industry standards such as those published by SSPC. Once a surface is cleaned of contaminants various methods to prepare surfaces to the specified level of cleanliness are used. The degree of cleaning required by a given project specification is dependent on the service environment. In making selections for surface cleaning and coating, it is critical that these items are properly matched. Surface preparation methods include hand and power tool cleaning, abrasive blast cleaning, and waterjetting.


Burgess R.A.,KTA Tator Inc
Journal of Protective Coatings and Linings | Year: 2014

Solvents are among the liquid components of coatings commonly referred to as the volatile vehicle. Upon application, and for some time afterward, the solvents evaporate, leaving the vehicle solids behind, which form the dry and cured coating film. The first, solvency, relates to the ability of any given solvent to dissolve a resin and produce a homogeneous solution. Solvency is also an important property because it controls the coating's viscosity for application purposes. The applied coating film may require both rapid and slow solvent release. Rapid release is primarily due to evaporation, the first stage of solvent release. Slow release is primarily controlled by solvent diffusion from the applied coating film. Several products may be listed for the same coating. Determining solvent selection will depend on the resin type, the ambient temperature, and the volatile organic compound (VOC) content.


Tator K.B.,KTA Tator Inc | Lanterman R.,KTA Tator Inc
NACE - International Corrosion Conference Series | Year: 2016

Coatings of many different types are widely used to provide color and pleasing aesthetics, and to prevent deterioration of the underlying substrate when exposed to various environments. To do this the coating must remain intact and adherent on the surface to which it has been applied. While the vast majority of all coatings perform admirably, premature failure can and does occur. The most common reasons for premature coating failure are insufficient surface preparation and/or deficient coating thickness. However, sometimes even properly specified, applied and cured coatings fail prematurely under atmospheric influences. Those atmospheric influences include the effects of heat and light; moisture, solvent, chemical and gas permeation; stress, both internal and external; and biological attack. Furthermore, the substrate over which the coating is applied (steel, aluminum, concrete, wood and others) also plays an important role in the mechanism and extent of deterioration. The effects of cathodic protection may induce or aggravate coating failure. This paper discusses the mechanisms of failure and provides a technical overview regarding the deterioration aspects of coatings. © 2016 by NACE International.


Helsel J.L.,KTA Tator Inc | Lanterman R.,KTA Tator Inc
NACE - International Corrosion Conference Series | Year: 2016

This paper is an update to "Expected Service Life and Cost Considerations for Maintenance and New Construction Protective Coating Work" co-Authored by J. L. Helsel, R. Lanterman and M. Reina for NACE Corrosion 2014. Designed to assist the coatings engineer or specifier in identifying candidate protective coating systems for specific service environments applicable to a broad array of industries, this paper provides: 1) commonly used generic coating systems; 2) service life for each in specific environments; 3) current material costs; 4) current field and shop painting costs; and 5) guidelines for calculating approximate installed costs of the systems. Guidelines for developing long-Term life-cycle costs and number of paintings for the expected life of the structure are included. The basic elements of economic analysis and justification are addressed together with guidance on the preparation of a Present Value Analysis. Examples are provided to aid the reader in the proper use of the information. Updates to the paper include revisions to the coating systems for atmospheric exposure and immersion service and updated cost data. © 2016 by NACE International.


Corbett W.D.,KTA Tator Inc
Journal of Protective Coatings and Linings | Year: 2013

The article discusses how to measure dry film coating thickness as per SSPC-PA 2. SSPC-PA 2 addresses two types of DFT gages, both of which are supplied by a variety of manufacturers. To help assure the reliability of the coating thickness measurements, ASTM D 7091 describes three operational steps that must be performed before taking the measurements. Verification of gage accuracy is typically performed using certified coated thickness standards. Adjustment of Type 2 gages to compensate for substrate characteristics is typically performed using certified shims. Dry film thickness gages are calibrated by the equipment manufacturer, its authorized agent, or an accredited calibration laboratory. A test certificate or other documentation showing traceability to a national metrology institution is required.


Tator K.B.,KTA Tator Inc
Materials Performance | Year: 2014

The application of nanotechnology in coatings industry is reviewed. Nanotechnology applications within coatings today include the use of extremely small nanoparticles as raw materials, the development, in situ, of extremely fine nanostructures, coatings comprised of extremely thin nanofilms, such as deposited films. There are a number of areas where coatings nanotechnology is currently commercially available, such as, self-cleaning coatings, depolluting coatings, ultraviolet (UV) light protective coatings, anticorrosion coatings, insulative nanocoatings, water sheeting coatings, water beading coatings, antifouling coatings, and anti-graffiti coatings. Self-cleaning coatings incorporate titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles, which are photocatalytic. TiO2 and nano-size TiO2 pigments in coatings provide good resistance to UV radiation degradation. Zinc-rich coatings are available with carbon nanowires throughout the coating cross-section.


Burgess R.A.,KTA Tator Inc
Journal of Protective Coatings and Linings | Year: 2016

The coating system applied to the concrete of this facility was not the one specified. A four-coat system was specified and only two distinct coating layers were present in the core samples. The waterproofing membrane specified was only found to be present in one of the four core samples and although only one aggregate was specified, two (colored and clear) were found to be present. A plane of weak intercoat adhesion was noted in the field as delamination was found between a coating layer filled with colored aggregate and the subsequent layer on each of the samples submitted. Two concrete core samples from non-failing locations arrived with the coating system intact, but it easily separated with mild pressure. The two concrete core samples from failing locations arrived with the coating system separated. Some of the coating failures were associated with moisture intrusion as evidenced by delamination with rust staining and efflorescence in coating cracks visible in the photographs provided (Fig. 3). It was reported that common plumbing chases between adjacent cells include water and waste connections. Leaks in these locations provide a path for water to travel along the concrete to the underside of the floor coating system. Once the moisture entered the concrete layer it migrated over a large area before showing evidence of its presence. There was also evidence that underlying layers, cementitious and aggregate-filled, had crumbled along delaminated edges. This was a progressive deterioration most likely brought about by loading on a non-adhered edge when there was flexure of the delaminated layer. There were insufficient layers and the layers present were not at the appropriate thickness or consistency of binder-to-aggregate ratio, possibly due to mixing differences from location to location. This is supported by the failure of the aggregate to fully integrate into the binder.


Senkowski E.B.,KTA Tator Inc
Journal of Protective Coatings and Linings | Year: 2015

The coating materials, surface preparation requirements, and application methods used to protect gas pipelines during gas exploration are discussed. Valuable insight is provided into the types of polymer-based coatings that are cost-effective and have a high level of acceptance in the gas pipeline industry. Liquid epoxy is primarily used a field-applied coating to cover girth welds, fittings and valves, along with performing field rehabilitation of short sections of pipe.


Burgess R.A.,KTA Tator Inc
Journal of Protective Coatings and Linings | Year: 2015

This article focuses on overcoating which includes some degree of spot-free and touch application. Best practices for writing an overcoating specification can help in addressing these issues. The scope of maintenance painting to be performed may be established on the basis of historical experience, the coating condition assessment, available funding or test patch, and other test results. The quality of the contract and specifications can contribute to a relatively smoothly running project or can lead to chaos.


Tator K.B.,KTA Tator Inc
Materials Performance | Year: 2014

This two-part article describes the application of nanotechnology in the coatings industry. Part 1 (in the March 2014 issue of MP) included a general introduction to nanotechnology and described fve types of nanocoatings. Part 2 covers four additional nanocoatings nd discusses the future of nanotechnology in coatings.

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