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News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

KANSAS CITY, Mo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kansas City Southern (KCS) (NYSE: KSU) Vice President Investor Relations, William Galligan, will address the Stephens Fall Investment Conference at 4:00 p.m. eastern time on Tuesday, November 8, 2016. Interested investors not attending the conference may listen to the presentation via a simultaneous webcast on KCS’ website at http://investors.kcsouthern.com. A link to the replay will be available following the event. Headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., Kansas C


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

KANSAS CITY, Mo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kansas City Southern (KCS) (NYSE: KSU) Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Michael W. Upchurch, will address the Barclays Industrial Select Conference at 1:15 p.m. eastern time on Wednesday, February 22, 2017. Interested investors not attending the conference may listen to the presentation via a simultaneous webcast on KCS’ website at http://investors.kcsouthern.com. A link to the replay will be available following the event. Headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., Kansas City Southern (KCS) (NYSE: KSU) is a transportation holding company that has railroad investments in the U.S., Mexico and Panama. Its primary U.S. holding is The Kansas City Southern Railway Company, serving the central and south central U.S. Its international holdings include Kansas City Southern de Mexico, S.A. de C.V., serving northeastern and central Mexico and the port cities of Lázaro Cárdenas, Tampico and Veracruz, and a 50 percent interest in Panama Canal Railway Company, providing ocean-to-ocean freight and passenger service along the Panama Canal. KCS’ North American rail holdings and strategic alliances are primary components of a NAFTA Railway system, linking the commercial and industrial centers of the U.S., Mexico and Canada.


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

KANSAS CITY, Mo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kansas City Southern (KCS) (NYSE: KSU) announced today that its 16th annual Holiday Express will distribute a total of $153,290 in gift cards to The Salvation Army at stops along the Holiday Express route. The gift cards are designated for the purchase of warm clothing and other necessities for kids in need. “On behalf of the employees of Kansas City Southern, we look forward to bringing Santa Claus and his elves on the Holiday Express train to communities thr


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

KANSAS CITY, Mo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kansas City Southern (KCS) (NYSE: KSU) Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Michael W. Upchurch, will address the Goldman Sachs Industrials Conference at 9:20 a.m. eastern time on Wednesday, November 2, 2016. Interested investors not attending the conference may listen to the presentation via a simultaneous webcast on KCS’ website at http://investors.kcsouthern.com. A link to the replay will be available following the event. Headquartered in K


News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

KANSAS CITY, Mo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kansas City Southern (KCS) (NYSE: KSU) Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Michael W. Upchurch, will address the Credit Suisse 4th Annual Industrials Conference at 8:45 a.m. eastern time on Thursday, December 1, 2016. Interested investors not attending the conference may listen to the presentation via a simultaneous webcast on KCS’ website at http://investors.kcsouthern.com. A link to the replay will be available following the event. Headquar


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

KANSAS CITY, Mo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kansas City Southern (KCS) (NYSE: KSU) Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Michael W. Upchurch, will address the Raymond James Institutional Investors Conference at 11:00 a.m. eastern time on Monday, March 6, 2017. Interested investors not attending the conference may listen to the presentation via a simultaneous webcast on KCS’ website at http://investors.kcsouthern.com. A link to the replay will be available following the event. Headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., Kansas City Southern (KCS) (NYSE: KSU) is a transportation holding company that has railroad investments in the U.S., Mexico and Panama. Its primary U.S. holding is The Kansas City Southern Railway Company, serving the central and south central U.S. Its international holdings include Kansas City Southern de Mexico, S.A. de C.V., serving northeastern and central Mexico and the port cities of Lázaro Cárdenas, Tampico and Veracruz, and a 50 percent interest in Panama Canal Railway Company, providing ocean-to-ocean freight and passenger service along the Panama Canal. KCS’ North American rail holdings and strategic alliances are primary components of a NAFTA Railway system, linking the commercial and industrial centers of the U.S., Mexico and Canada.


News Article | November 11, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

KANSAS CITY, Mo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kansas City Southern’s (KCS) (NYSE:KSU) Board of Directors on November 10, 2016 declared a regular dividend of $0.25 per share on the outstanding KCS 4% non-cumulative preferred stock. The dividend is payable on January 17, 2017 to preferred stockholders of record at the close of business on December 30, 2016. The Board of Directors also declared a regular dividend of $0.33 per share on the outstanding KCS common stock. This dividend is payable on January 18,


Artificial sweeteners be damned; these naturally occurring, safe proteins are thousands of times sweeter than sugar KSU plant biochemical geneticist Raj Nagarajan describes the properties of Thaumatin, Monellin and Brazzein, all found in west African plants that are generally considered safe for consumption; each is a protein, and they are, respectively, 1,000x, 2000x, and 3000x sweeter than sugar. Thaumatin and Monellin have been approved as sweeteners in Japan and for some purposes in the EU and US, while Brazzein awaits regulatory approval. They contain "negligible" calories, and no known negative metabolic effect -- no experimental effects on blood sugar or body weight. There are challenges to the large-scale use of these proteins. Monellin breaks down under high temperatures, making it unsuited to baking, for example -- though Brazzein is very stable and promising, and can be expressed in GMO corn. Scientists are just beginning to solve the mysteries of these sweet proteins and how they induce the sweetness on our tongues. All these studies promise to help us understand why we crave sugary substances and why some people want sugar more than others. Customer demand will lead to new types of foods that do not contain as much sugar and that would ultimately help people reduce their consumption of it. Therefore, sweet proteins might play a pivotal role both in food and taste research in the future. And since it has been shown that too much sugar is detrimental to one’s health, they might be a viable substitution for sugar in foods. But, you may say, we just learned about the existence of sweet proteins; how nice it will be to taste a brazzein- or monellin- supplemented diet ice cream. Yes, you are right—variety is the spice of life, and innovation to reduce the amount of sugar in food, while maintaining product integrity, is an absolute necessity for good health. You can have your cake and eat it too!


Kontsevich M.,IHES | Soibelman Y.,KSU
Communications in Number Theory and Physics | Year: 2011

To a quiver with potential we assign an algebra in the category of exponential mixed Hodge structures (the latter is also introduced in the paper). We compute the algebra (which we call Cohomological Hall algebra) for quivers without potential and study factorization properties of its Poincaré-Hilbert series in general case. As an application we obtain an alternative approach to our theory of motivic Donaldson-Thomas invariants of 3-dimensional Calabi-Yau categories and prove their integrality properties. We discuss the relationship of Cohomological Hall algebra with other mathematical structures including cluster algebras and Chern- Simons theory.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.materialstoday.com

Forget chemicals, catalysts and expensive machinery – a team of physicists at Kansas State University (KSU) has discovered a way to mass-produce graphene using just three simple ingredients: hydrocarbon gas, oxygen and a spark plug. Their method is simple. Fill a chamber with acetylene or ethylene gas and oxygen; use a vehicle spark plug to create a contained detonation; collect the graphene that forms afterward. Chris Sorensen, professor of physics at KSU, is the lead inventor of this novel process, which was recently granted a patent. Other KSU researchers involved include Arjun Nepal, a postdoctoral researcher and instructor of physics, and Gajendra Prasad Singh, a former visiting scientist. "We have discovered a viable process to make graphene," Sorensen said. "Our process has many positive properties, from the economic feasibility, the possibility for large-scale production and the lack of nasty chemicals. What might be the best property of all is that the energy required to make a gram of graphene through our process is much less than other processes because all it takes is a single spark." Graphene is a single atom-thick sheet of hexagonally-coordinated carbon atoms, which makes it the world's thinnest material. Since graphene was first isolated in 2004, scientists have found that it possesses valuable physical and electronic properties with many possible applications, including more efficient rechargeable batteries and better electronics. For Sorensen's research team, the serendipitous path to creating graphene started when they were developing and patenting carbon soot aerosol gels. They created the gels by filling a 17L aluminum chamber with acetylene gas and oxygen, and then using a spark plug to produce a detonation in the chamber. The soot from the detonation formed aerosol gels that looked like "black angel food cake", Sorensen said. But on further analysis, the researchers found that the aerosol gel was more than just a lookalike for dark angel food cake – it was graphene. "We made graphene by serendipity," Sorensen said. "We didn't plan on making graphene. We planned on making the aerosol gel and we got lucky." Unlike other methods for creating graphene, Sorensen's method is simple, efficient, low-cost and scalable for industry. These other methods include ‘cooking’ the mineral graphite with chemicals – such as sulfuric acid, sodium nitrate, potassium permanganate or hydrazine – for a long time at precisely prescribed temperatures, and heating hydrocarbons to 1000°C in the presence of catalysts. Such methods are energy intensive – and even dangerous – and have low yields, while Sorensen and his team's method makes larger quantities with minimal energy and no dangerous chemicals. "The real charm of our experiment is that we can produce graphene in the quantity of grams rather than milligrams," Nepal said. The research team is now working to improve the quality of the graphene and to scale the laboratory process to an industrial level. To this end, they are upgrading some of the equipment to make it easier to get graphene from the chamber quickly: seconds – rather than minutes – after the detonation. Accessing the graphene more quickly could improve the quality of the material, Sorensen said. This story is adapted from material from Kansas State University, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. Link to original source.

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