Krkonose National Park Administration

Czech Republic

Krkonose National Park Administration

Czech Republic
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Gouveia A.,Palacky University | Bejcek V.,Czech University of Life Sciences | Flousek J.,Krkonose National Park Administration | Sedlacek F.,Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic | And 6 more authors.
Population Ecology | Year: 2015

The subject of population cycles is regarded as controversial due to a number of unsettled questions such as whether or not cyclic patterns are governed by the same processes at high and low latitudes in Europe. Recent evidence suggests that the dynamics at high and low latitudes share the common temporal pattern of vole dynamics referred to as collapsing population cycles. Despite concurrent interest, the key contention around the causal mechanisms that drive population cycles remains a hot topic in ecology. The aims of this study are to supplement information on the seasonal population dynamics of the field vole Microtus agrestis in the Czech Republic by analysing 25 years of time series data. By applying robust estimation procedures, we estimated several parameters to describe population dynamics, such as population variability, amplitude dampening, cycle period, order of the dynamics and the structure of density dependence. The parameters indicate that field vole dynamics in central Europe are highly variable, cyclic dynamics of order two, with peaks in abundance occurring regularly at intervals of 4–5 years. In addition to exhibiting population cycles, the field vole populations show a pattern of dampened amplitude as observed elsewhere in Europe, including northern latitudes. By analysing temporal trends in seasonal abundances, population growth rates and environmental temperatures, we did not obtain evidence to support the hypothesis that amplitude dampening results from the negative effect of increasingly mild winters on winter population growth rates. © 2015, European Union.


Flousek J.,Krkonose National Park Administration | Telensky T.,Charles University | Telensky T.,Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic | Hanzelka J.,Charles University | Reif J.,Charles University
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Climate change is among the most important global threats to biodiversity and mountain areas are supposed to be under especially high pressure. Although recent modelling studies suggest considerable future range contractions of montane species accompanied with increased extinction risk, data allowing to test actual population consequences of the observed climate changes and identifying traits associated to their adverse impacts are very scarce. To fill this knowledge gap, we estimated long-term population trends of montane birds from 1984 to 2011 in a central European mountain range, the Giant Mountains (Krkonoše), where significant warming occurred over this period. We then related the population trends to several species' traits related to the climate change effects. We found that the species breeding in various habitats at higher altitudes had more negative trends than species breeding at lower altitudes. We also found that the species moved upwards as a response to warming climate, and these altitudinal range shifts were associated with more positive population trends at lower altitudes than at higher altitudes. Moreover, long-distance migrants declined more than residents or species migrating for shorter distances. Taken together, these results indicate that the climate change, besides other possible environmental changes, already influences populations of montane birds with particularly adverse impacts on high-altitude species such as water pipit (Anthus spinoletta). It is evident that the alpine species, predicted to undergo serious climatically induced range contractions due to warming climate in the future, already started moving along this trajectory. © 2015 Flousek et al.


Reif J.,Charles University | Reif J.,Palacky University | Flousek J.,Krkonose National Park Administration
Oikos | Year: 2012

Climate change is one of the most important recent forces modulating the structure of ecological communities worldwide. Although a number of studies have documented climatically induced altitudinal range shifts, with species move upwards with increasing temperature and tracking their climatic optima, an examination of interspecific variability in such altitudinal shifts remains unexplored. Using a unique dataset on the altitudinal distribution of birds in a central European mountain range, collected with constant effort and methodology over more than 20 years, we examined the effects of particular species' ecological traits on interspecific variability in altitudinal range shifts. We predicted that shifts would be greater in species with narrower European climatic niches, breeding in open habitats, feeding on insects and originally breeding at lower altitudes. Patterns of the shifts differed within the time period studied. In the first decade, no climate change was observed and species did not show any direction in their altitudinal shifts. In the second decade, local spring temperatures increased and species moved to higher altitudes. These altitudinal shifts were related to species' habitat preferences, with open habitat species shifting to higher altitudes than forest species. The effect of other predictors was relatively small. The habitat effects imply either stronger self-regulation of the forest microclimate compared to open habitats, with forest species less forced to move upwards, or a delayed shift in the alpine timberline due to the slow growth of trees. In the latter case, forest species would face unfavourable climatic conditions and at the same time be constrained by the limited distribution of their habitat. Our study shows that species' ecology can considerably alter the actual outcome of the impacts of ongoing climate change in mountain areas. © 2011 The Authors. Oikos © 2011 Nordic Society Oikos.


PubMed | Krkonose National Park Administration, Charles University and Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Climate change is among the most important global threats to biodiversity and mountain areas are supposed to be under especially high pressure. Although recent modelling studies suggest considerable future range contractions of montane species accompanied with increased extinction risk, data allowing to test actual population consequences of the observed climate changes and identifying traits associated to their adverse impacts are very scarce. To fill this knowledge gap, we estimated long-term population trends of montane birds from 1984 to 2011 in a central European mountain range, the Giant Mountains (Krkonoe), where significant warming occurred over this period. We then related the population trends to several species traits related to the climate change effects. We found that the species breeding in various habitats at higher altitudes had more negative trends than species breeding at lower altitudes. We also found that the species moved upwards as a response to warming climate, and these altitudinal range shifts were associated with more positive population trends at lower altitudes than at higher altitudes. Moreover, long-distance migrants declined more than residents or species migrating for shorter distances. Taken together, these results indicate that the climate change, besides other possible environmental changes, already influences populations of montane birds with particularly adverse impacts on high-altitude species such as water pipit (Anthus spinoletta). It is evident that the alpine species, predicted to undergo serious climatically induced range contractions due to warming climate in the future, already started moving along this trajectory.


Kralj J.,Croatian Academy of science and Arts | Flousek J.,Krkonose National Park Administration | Huzak M.,University of Zagreb | Cikovic D.,Croatian Academy of science and Arts | Dolenec Z.,University of Zagreb
Annales Zoologici Fennici | Year: 2013

The goldcrest (Regulus regulus) and the firecrest (Regulus ignicapilla) are sympatric over a large part of Europe, but with different abundance ratios. We studied the effects of geographical location, vicinity of the species range boundaries, habitat and climate factors on the goldcrest/firecrest abundance ratio. At the continental scale, a weighted multiple linear regression model resulted in four significant covariates: temperature, precipitation, forest type and occurrence rate (representing the vicinity of the species' range boundaries). The firecrest dominates in warmer and more humid areas and its dominance is more pronounced in mixed forests. The projection of the model showed that in any combination of temperature, precipitation and occurrence rate, the probability to encounter the goldcrest is higher in coniferous forests. Studies in Croatia and the Czech Republic showed regional differences in habitat preferences related to forest type. A significant effect of the seasonal dynamics of precipitation was confirmed in Croatia. Climate change and changes in forestry may influence the distribution and abundance of these two Regulus species in Europe. © Finnish Zoological and Botanical Publishing Board 2013.


Vacek S.,Czech University of Life Sciences | Noskova I.,Czech University of Life Sciences | Bilek L.,Czech University of Life Sciences | Vacek Z.,Czech University of Life Sciences | Schwarz O.,Krkonose National Park Administration
Journal of Forest Science | Year: 2010

The article describes natural, combined and artificial regeneration on 38 permanent research plots in both Czech and Polish part of the Krkonoše Mts. The attention is paid to species composition, spatial (horizontal and vertical) and age structure of forest regeneration according to different stand and site conditions. Concerning the structure and dynamics of forest stands and their regeneration, the potential and prospects of regeneration according to particular developmental stages and stand types (beech stands; mixed stands: spruce-beech, fir-beech, spruce-firbeech; spruce stands, stands in the ecotone of the upper forest limit and relict pine woods) were evaluated. In many aspects the plots show several similarities, nevertheless the regeneration in different site and stand conditions show clear differences in dynamics of development. The main differences are result of different ecological conditions, environmental limits and biological characteristics of dominant tree species.


Ruzicka V.,Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic | Vanek J.,Krkonose National Park Administration | Smilauer P.,University of South Bohemia
Russian Journal of Ecology | Year: 2012

Ground-living spiders were studied using modified pitfall traps during several years in four characteristic habitats in Giant Mountains (Krkonoše Mts.), the High Sudetes, Czech Republic: alpine tundra, subalpine mire, tall-herb stand at the bottom of a glacial corrie, and decaying mountain spruce forest. Ecological and zoogeographical aspects of spider communities were analysed. The spider communities of alpine tundra, subalpine mire, and glacial corrie exhibited long-term stability, whereas the community of decaying mountain forest changed during observations. Small linyphiid spiders, dominating in mature forest, were gradually replaced by larger Iycosid and gnaphosid species. Zoogeographic characterization of mountain habitats was made based on species exhibiting disjunctive area. In contrast to plants, for spiders of boreal origin alpine tundra is the most important habitat for survival, followed by screes, mires, spruce forests, and corries. © 2012 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.


The paper summarises data on occurrence of the Aquatic Warbler (Acrocephalus paludicola) in the territory of the present Czech Republic in 1946-2011. Altogether 129 individuals were ringed, 85 visual observations of 108 birds were made and 3 dead specimens were recorded during the study period. In both ringed and observed individuals, records from the period of spring migration prevail. Based on ringing data, the spring passage peaked in the 3rd ten-day period of April. Concerning the records of observed birds, the passage did not show any distinct peak (most observations come from the 1st-3rd ten-day period of May). In the breeding season (1 June - 19 July), no birds were captured but 22 observations of 25 individuals, including singing males, were made. However, breeding of the species has not been documented in the country so far. The autumn migration occurred from the 3rd ten-day period of July with a peak in the 1st or 2nd ten-day period of September (ringing data and visual observations pooled). Almost 80% of the records come from central and southern Bohemia, from the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands and northern Moravia. Most of the ringed birds were captured in lowlands (mean altitude 258 m a.s.l., median 210 m, n = 129), while in the observed birds the mean altitude was 334 m (median 240 m, n = 85). Altogether 71% of the captured birds were recorded in a specific habitat type - on the margin of reed beds continuing to low sedges, or in wet meadows. Most (63%) of the observed and captured birds were recorded at sites with no protection status, 37% in protected areas. Long-term trend in the number of captured Aquatic Warblers, in relation to ringing effort, suggests that the number of birds passing through the country has declined since 1960. Despite that, the obtained data confirm that there still are important stopover sites of the Aquatic Warbler in the country and the Czech Republic thus ranks among range states of this globally threatened species.

Loading Krkonose National Park Administration collaborators
Loading Krkonose National Park Administration collaborators