Central Hospital Kristianstad Kristianstad Sweden

Kristianstad Kristianstad Sweden, Sweden

Central Hospital Kristianstad Kristianstad Sweden

Kristianstad Kristianstad Sweden, Sweden

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Westergren A.,The PRO CARE Group | Edfors E.,The PRO CARE Group | Norberg E.,Central Hospital Kristianstad Kristianstad Sweden | Stubbendorff A.,The County Council of Skane Lund Sweden | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice | Year: 2017

Rationale: A previous short-term study showed that a computer-based training in eating and nutrition increased the probability for hospital inpatients at undernutrition (UN) risk to receive nutritional treatment and care without increasing overtreatment (providing nutritional treatment to those not at UN risk). The aim of this study was to investigate if a computer-based training in eating and nutrition influences the precision in nutritional treatment and care in a longer-term perspective. Method: A preintervention and postintervention study was conducted with a cross-sectional design at each time points (baseline and 7 months postintervention). Hospital inpatients >18 years old at baseline (2013; n = 201) and follow-up (2014; n = 209) were included. A computer-based training was implemented during a period of 3 months with 297 (84%) participating registered nurses and nurse assistants. Undernutrition risk was screened for using the minimal eating observation and nutrition form-version II. Nutritional treatment and care was recorded using a standardized protocol. Results: The share of patients at UN risk that received energy-dense food (+25.2%) and dietician consultations (+22.3%) increased between baseline and follow-up, while fewer received oral nutritional supplements (-18.9%). "Overtreatment" (providing nutritional treatment to those not at UN risk) did not change between baseline and follow-up. Conclusion: The computer-based training increased the provision of energy-dense food and dietician consultations to patients at UN risk without increasing overtreatment of patients without UN risk. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Westergren A.,The PRO CARE Group | Edfors E.,The PRO CARE Group | Norberg E.,Central Hospital Kristianstad Kristianstad Sweden | Stubbendorff A.,The County Council of Skane Lund Sweden | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice | Year: 2016

Rationale: This study aimed to explore whether a computer-based training in eating and nutrition for hospital nursing staff can influence the precision in nutritional treatment and care. Method: A pre-intervention and post-intervention study was conducted with a cross-sectional design at each time point. The settings were one intervention (IH) and two control hospitals (CH1 and CH2). Hospital inpatients >18years old at baseline (2012; n=409) and follow-up (2014; n=456) were included. The computer-based training was implemented during a period of 3months in the IH with 297 (84%) participating registered nurses and nurse assistants. Nutritional risk was screened for using the Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form. Nutritional treatment and care was recorded using a standardized protocol Results: In the IH, there was an increase in the share of patients at UN risk that received energy-dense food (+16.7%) and dietician consultations (+17.3%) between baseline and follow-up, while fewer received feeding assistance (-16.2%). There was an increase in the share of patients at UN risk that received energy-dense food (+19.5%), a decrease in oral nutritional supplements (-30.5%) and food-registrations (-30.6%) in CH1, whereas there were no changes in CH2. 'Overtreatment' (providing nutritional treatment to those not at UN risk) was significantly higher in CH2 (52.7%) than in CH1 (14.3%) and in the IH (25.2%) at follow-up. Conclusion: The computer-based training seemed to increase the probability for patients at UN risk in the IH to receive nutritional treatment without increasing overtreatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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