Johor, Malaysia
Johor, Malaysia

Time filter

Source Type

From November 2 to 4 Almaty hosted the Central Asian International Exhibition dedicated to the food industry – WorldFood Kazakhstan 2016. Thirty-three (33) countries participated in the event and demonstrated food, drinks, equipment and different technologies. This year, the participants from Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Brazil, Hungary, Germany, India, Indonesia, Iran, Italy, China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and other countries exhibited in the sections as “Food and Beverage,” “Equipment and Technology,” “Ingredients,” “Bakery, Confectionery.” Twelve national groups were presented at the exhibition WorldFood Kazakhstan 2016. In parallel with the exhibition for the food industry five more specialized events were held on the same platform. The total number of exhibitors was 362 companies. Russia, Belarus and Kyrgyzstan demonstrated the products from the leading manufacturers, promoting the development of economic relations within the Customs Union. So, Russia introduced the manufacturers of food and beverages through the regional group stands: Omsk, Novosibirsk and Kirov regions and the Altai Territory. “The proof of the successful work in this segment of the market is to participate in exhibitions of Russian producers of high-quality and eco-friendly products that can offer a variety of models of maintaining data of areas of business, examine interesting concepts that will result in strengthening of business ties between our countries, the establishment of modern enterprises and creation of new jobs, – said the Trade Representative of the RF in the Republic of Kazakhstan A.V. Yakovlev. More than 30 producers of Kazakhstan at the independent exposition introduced new items in assortment, products that have already proven themselves in the domestic market and export products in the following areas: meat and fish products, sausages, confectionery products, canned fruit and vegetables, groceries, ingredients, additives, containers and packaging. “We are the domestic manufacturers, produce 100% organic products. We are proud of our products. The exhibition was very active, quite a good amount of useful contacts was established. The exhibition became more highly attended”, – evaluated the exhibition Nurlan Tazhimgaliyev, Regional Director of OSPANOFF. The exposition of the Hungarian group this year has doubled its representation compared to last year. The reason for this, according to József Urabana, member of the Hungarian stand was “high interest of the exhibition participants in 2015 in the supply of the Hungarian products to Kazakhstan’s market”. “Here, on the platform, we can show more than 30 kinds of products to our potential partners. All companies have come here to establish new contacts, find new distributors”, – explained József Urabana. In addition, the exposition of China also represented about 20 companies and all sections of the exhibition: Ingredients, Food Products and Beverages, Processing and Manufacturing Equipment, Packaging and Packaging Equipment. The extended business program of the event included the master classes of top chefs, as well as seminars of the specialized professionals. In the framework of WorldFood Kazakhstan 2016 the professional competition – Tasting of food products and drinks “The Best Product of WorldFood Kazakhstan 2016” has been held for the 18th time. The competition was held with the support of the Kazakh Academy of Nutrition. The companies “Sultan Marketing” LLP, “New-Aldzhansky Flour Mill” LLP, “Tsesna-Astyk” Concern” LLP, “KEMMI GROUP” LLP, “Green Foods” LLP, “Pinsk Meat-Packing Plant” OJSC, “AL’BA Foods Company” LLP, “TPO AS” LLP, “BAITEREK-4”, “Qing Kaz” LLP, “Kamerton” Company” LLP, “Factory of the Kazakh Academy of Nutrition “Amiran” LLP, “Nalchik Dairy Plant” LLC, “FoodMaster Trade Company” LLP, “ECOPROM GROUP” LLP, “Tea House” LLP, Ionenko IE, Kofeinye Napitki IE, “Galen” Pharmaceutical Factory” LLC, “Altai Seligor” LLC, “Napitki na Dom” LLP, “Keremet Su SKE” LLP , KAZKON, “ViZaVi company” LLP, “Sladkaya Sloboda” LLC, EFES Kazakhstan, “Minsk Kristall” OJSC, “BIO-PRODUKT.KZ” LLP, “Maksimalnyi Razmah Corporation” LLP were awarded the Quality Mark – Golden Medal “Best Product of WorldFood Kazkahstan 2016” . Organizers of WorldFood Kazakhstan 2016: Kazakhstan Exhibition Company Iteca and its partner ITE Group Plc.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.acnnewswire.com

1,900+ Exhibitors Showcase Dazzling Collections at AsiaWorld-Expo; International Jewellery Show to Open on Thursday at HKCEC The International Diamond, Gem & Pearl Show opened today and continues through 4 March at the AsiaWorld-Expo. This fourth edition of the show, organised by the Hong Kong Trade Development Council (HKTDC), welcomes more than 1,900 exhibitors from 39 countries and regions to showcase raw jewellery materials including quality diamonds, precious gems, semi-precious stones and exquisite pearls. On Thursday (2 March), the 34th HKTDC Hong Kong International Jewellery Show will begin its five-day run at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre (HKCEC). The International Jewellery Show, which is dedicated to finished jewellery products, along with the International Diamond, Gem & Pearl Show, feature a total of about 4,480 exhibitors from 52 countries and regions, forming the world's largest jewellery marketplace for sourcing and networking. "The outlook for the jewellery industry is positive, based on signs of recovery in the United States economy while emerging markets such as the Chinese mainland and ASEAN are displaying a sustained demand for jewellery," Benjamin Chau, Deputy Executive Director, HKTDC, said. "However, with fierce competition in the market, jewellery manufacturers and retailers have to stay ahead of the curve by seeking out the best suppliers and keeping up with market trends by understanding the latest materials, technological advancements and the needs of buyers and consumers. Our fairs are designed to address these issues." - Quality diamonds and gems from around the globe - Dedicated zones facilitate convenient sourcing of various product categories. The Hall of Fine Diamonds gathers top-of-the-range diamond suppliers from around the world showcasing high carat and top quality diamonds. Exhibitors include Dharam Creations (Booth no.: 2-L24), Kiran (Booth no.: 2-K02) and Novel Collection (Booth no.: 2-R02) from Hong Kong, NIMESH GEMS (Booth no.: 2-T10) and Venus Jewel (Booth no.: 2-R08) from India, SwissDiam (Booth no.: 2-Q06) from Switzerland, Kristall (Booth no.: 2-S21) from Russia, Gemstar (Booth no.: 2-T17) from Israel and DBS Diamond (Booth no.: 2-S12) from the US. Treasures of Nature features a variety of precious gemstones. As well as popular emeralds, rubies and opals, rarer precious stones such as Ceylon pink sapphires, light red spinels and Paraiba gems are also on show. Treasures of Ocean presents natural precious pearls that offer top quality and value. The Rough Stones & Minerals zone, which was launched last year, returns to present unpolished and uncut precious stones and gems to buyers. Aside from product zones, 22 group pavilions including Australia, Brazil, the Chinese mainland, Colombia, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Thailand and the US showcase different jewellery raw materials. Prominent jewellery trade organisations have also set up their own pavilions, including Antwerp World Diamond Centre, International Colored Gemstone Association and Tanzanite Foundation. - One-stop platform for buying missions - The HKTDC organised more than 110 buying missions comprising over 7,400 buyers from some 70 countries and regions. Aside from gaining insights into the latest products and sourcing opportunities worldwide, buyers can also participate in seminars under a variety of themes. GIA experts are invited to introduce natural IIa diamonds, while a buyer forum will analyse the opportunities arising from the Belt and Road Initiative. Exhibitors and buyers will be able to exchange ideas while appreciating exquisite gems. Business matching services are also provided for buyers to meet with potential suppliers to enhance sourcing efficiency. - International Jewellery Show opens Thursday - The 34th edition of the Hong Kong International Jewellery Show will kick off at the HKCEC on 2 March. The show is set to offer finished jewellery products, including elite jewellery collections, premier brands, antique jewellery as well as new designer brands etc. The synergy between the two shows will generate more effective and convenient business exchanges among raw material suppliers and finished jewellery brands. The International Jewellery Show will provide a diverse sourcing opportunity, featuring the Hall of Fame devoted to the elegance of popular brands; Hall of Extraordinary with rare and top-tier jewellery pieces; Design Galleria that showcases innovative creations; World of Glamour spotlighting Hong Kong-based exhibitors; as well as Treasures of Craftsmanship where jewellery and art converge. A number of networking receptions will also be organised during the International Jewellery Show. Events include the Gala Dinner on the first day (2 March) sponsored by Tanzanite Foundation, where invited guests will enjoy a menu prepared by Chef Robert Fontana, ASEAN Chairman of Disciples Escoffier International Asia, while appreciating jewellery parades and other performances. The culinary and visual pleasure will surely enrich the night already full of networking opportunities. During the fair period, jewellery parades will allow buyers to examine selected items from exhibitors. Themed seminars will furnish industry players with the latest product trends, market information and technological advancements. During the concurrent fair period a free shuttle bus service will be provided between AsiaWorld-Expo (Hong Kong International Diamond, Gem & Pearl Show) and downtown areas (including HKCEC). Please visit the fair website for more details. Fair Websites: HKTDC Hong Kong International Jewellery Show: http://www.hktdc.com/hkjewelleryshow HKTDC Hong Kong International Diamond, Gem & Pearl Show: http://www.hktdc.com/hkdgp Photo Download: http://bit.ly/2lOO9XM Media Registration: Media representatives wishing to cover the event may register on-site with their business cards and/or media identification. To view press releases in Chinese, please visit http://mediaroom.hktdc.com/tc (Photo:) Gregory So, Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development of the HKSAR Government, officiates the opening ceremony of the International Diamond, Gem & Pearl Show. About HKTDC Established in 1966, the Hong Kong Trade Development Council (HKTDC) is a statutory body dedicated to creating opportunities for Hong Kong's businesses. With more than 40 offices globally, including 13 on the Chinese mainland, the HKTDC promotes Hong Kong as a platform for doing business with China, Asia and the world. With 50 years of experience, the HKTDC organises international exhibitions, conferences and business missions to provide companies, particularly SMEs, with business opportunities on the mainland and in international markets, while providing information via trade publications, research reports and digital channels including the media room. For more information, please visit: www.hktdc.com/aboutus. Follow us on Google+, Twitter @hktdc, LinkedIn. Google+: https://plus.google.com/+hktdc Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/hktdc LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/hong-kong-trade-development-council Contact:


Trademark
Kristall | Date: 2015-04-06

Alcoholic beverages, except beer, including alcoholic beverages containing fruit; aperitifs, included in this class; arak arrack; brandy; wine; piquette; whisky; vodka; gin; digesters liqueurs and spirits; cocktails, included in this class; liqueurs; spirits beverages; distilled beverages; hydromel mead; peppermint liqueurs; bitters; rum; sake; cider; rice alcohol; alcoholic extracts; fruit extracts, alcoholic; alcoholic essences.


Trademark
Kristall | Date: 2012-03-22

Beverage waters, namely aerated water, carbonated water, still water, table water; non-alcoholic aperitifs, namely alcohol-free beers, alcohol free wine; non-alcoholic beverages, namely carbonated beverages. Alcoholic beverages, except beer; alcoholic essences; alcoholic extracts; aperitifs; bitters; brandy; gin; liqueurs; vodka.


Trademark
Kristall | Date: 2013-01-18

Alcoholic beverages, except beer, including aperitifs; arak (arrack); brandy; wine; piquette; whisky; vodka; gin; digesters; cocktails; alcoholic beverages; alcoholic beverages containing fruit; spirits (beverages); distilled beverages; hydromel (mead); peppermint liqueurs; bitters; rum; sake; perry; cider; rice alcohol; alcoholic extracts; fruit extracts, alcoholic; alcoholic essences.


Trademark
Kristall | Date: 2012-02-09

Aperitifs, non-alcoholic; non-alcoholic beverages, waters (beverages) including aerated, mineral, table waters; kvass (non-alcoholic beverage); cocktails non-alcoholic; lemonades; vegetable juices (beverages); fruit juices including non-alcoholic fruit nectars; preparations for making mineral water, aerated water, preparations for making liqueurs and beverages; non-alcoholic fruit extracts, essences for making beverages. Alcoholic beverages, except beers; alcoholic beverages containing fruit; aperitifs; arak (arrack); brandy; wine; piquette; whisky; vodka; gin; digesters (liqueurs and spirits); cocktails; liqueurs; spirits (beverages); distilled beverages; hydromel (mead); peppermint liqueurs; bitters; rum; sake; rice alcohol; alcoholic extracts; fruit extracts, alcoholic; alcoholic essences. Demonstration of goods; presentation of goods on communication media, for retail purposes; sales promotion for others; distribution of samples; advertising; on-line advertising on a computer network; procurement services for others (purchasing goods and services for other businesses).


Trademark
Kristall | Date: 2013-07-17

Aperitifs; arrack arak; brandy; wine; piquette; whisky; vodka; gin; digesters liqueurs and spirits; cocktails; liqueurs; alcoholic beverages, except beer; alcoholic beverages containing fruit; spirits beverages; distilled beverages; mead hydromel; peppermint liqueurs; bitters; rum; sake; cider; rice alcohol; alcoholic extracts; fruit extracts, alcoholic; alcoholic essences.


Trademark
Kristall | Date: 2013-07-17

Beers; mineral and aerated waters and other non-alcoholic beverages; fruit beverages and fruit juices; syrups and other preparations for making beverages; aperitifs, non-alcoholic; lithia water; seltzer water; soda water; aerated water; mineral water beverages; waters beverages; table waters; kvass non-alcoholic beverage; cocktails, non-alcoholic; lemonades; peanut milk non-alcoholic beverage; milk of almonds beverage; non-alcoholic beverages; isotonic beverages; non-alcoholic honey-based beverages; aloe vera drinks, non-alcoholic; whey beverages; non-alcoholic fruit juice beverages; fruit nectars, non-alcoholic; orgeat; ginger beer; malt beer; powders for effervescing beverages; sarsaparilla non-alcoholic beverage; syrups for lemonade; syrups for beverages; smoothies; vegetable juices beverages; fruit juices; tomato juice beverage; cider, non-alcoholic; preparations for making aerated water; preparations for making liqueurs; preparations for making mineral water; preparations for making beverages; must; grape must, unfermented; beer wort; malt wort; pastilles for effervescing beverages; sherbets beverages; non-alcoholic fruit extracts; extracts of hops for making beer; essences for making beverages. Alcoholic beverages (except beers); aperitifs; arrack arak; brandy; wine; piquette; whisky; vodka; anisette liqueur; kirsch; gin; digesters liqueurs and spirits; cocktails; curacao; anise liqueur; liqueurs; alcoholic beverages, except beer; pre-mixed alcoholic beverages, other than beer-based; alcoholic beverages containing fruit; distilled beverages; spirits beverages; mead hydromel; peppermint liqueurs; bitters; nira sugarcane-based alcoholic beverage; rum; sake; perry; cider; rice alcohol; alcoholic extracts; fruit extracts, alcoholic; alcoholic essences.


Polymers (plastics) such as polyurethane and polystyrene have been the standard coating materials used in the design and development of products and equipment over the last several decades. We see and touch them numerous times on a daily basis. These coatings, while functional, have several deficiencies. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes photooxidative degradation, resulting in the breaking of polymer chains. We have all likely witnessed the destruction of these types of transparent coatings, often within a remarkably few years or months of application, despite all of the modern science of additives, designed to prevent the negative effects of UV light on polymers. Polymer coatings also have low resistance to abrasion, chemicals and extreme heat. In addition, these coatings have mediocre light transmission properties and often suffer from solarization and browning. In stark contrast, the new breed of silica-based coatings represents an evolutionary advance over polymer-based offerings. Because silica is the primary material in glass, it shares the qualities of glass – superior transparency and toughness – yet has the flexibility and versatility normally associated with commonplace polymer coatings. These silica-based coatings also are highly resistant to UV degradation. Silica-based coatings are also durable enough to be applied in thicknesses that would be far too low for any polymer to be effective. Although these coatings are glass based, their ultra-thin dimensions make them quite flexible, eliminating the main concern with glass, namely its fragility. Silica coatings have better light transmission, thermal properties, and acid resistance than traditional polymer coatings. Consistent with efforts by researchers worldwide to use eco-friendly materials, these coatings are also non-toxic and contain no fossil fuel elements, unlike their oil-based polymer counterparts. Silica coatings can also be tuned to provide a multitude of other benefits, such as abrasion resistance, omniphobicity, oleophobicity, and anti-reflectivity, to name a few. Research and development divisions can leverage silica coatings’ ability to act as a durable and resilient host for functional materials, which when added to the surfaces of existing products, creates a variety of enhanced effects. Such functionality can be a game changer for the creation of products only feasible with this new glass-based coating. Some examples may include copper nanoparticles to reduce barnacle accumulation on nautical vessels and UV-blocking nanoparticles to mitigate radiation for both terrestrial and interstellar uses. For others, the added functionality allows for significant improvements to existing products, making them lighter, stronger and more durable. Some companies, such as Enki technologies and DSM NV, have developed and used silica-based coatings as anti-reflective and soil-resistant coverings to improve solar photovoltaic panel efficiency. Companies such as Kristall and South Korea-based Ceko make scratch and oil-resistant, silica-based coatings offered to R&D pros within the automobile and cell phone markets, respectively. These R&D pros, in turn, use the coating to re-engineer a number of pieces used in the manufacture of these products. Other silica-based offerings also laud their hydrophobic and graffiti-resistant abilities. U.S.-based MetaShield has created a silica-based coating that employs leading-edge nanotech principles to provide toughness and durability to a variety of substrates. Its 1 micron thick MetaShield coating meaningfully increases the mechanical strength of ordinary glass without adding size, weight or visible distortion. The company is in advanced-stage collaborations with major glass suppliers and mobile device companies to implement their glass strengthening technology in cell phones and other electronic devices. As silica-based coatings gain acceptance, they enable research engineers and product developers worldwide to utilize materials that would otherwise not be practical due to their weak external durability. In the end, the main question is: How do plastic coatings compare with the new, nano-enabled glass coatings? Simply put, silica based coatings herald a significant disruption in the coatings market that has been dominated by waterborne polymers for the last half century. About the Authors: Martin Ben-Dayan is CEO, and co-founder of MetaShield, along with William Bickmore who also serves as the company’s Chief Technology Officer.

Loading Kristall collaborators
Loading Kristall collaborators