Korean Institute for Knit Industry

Iksan, South Korea

Korean Institute for Knit Industry

Iksan, South Korea
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Hassan M.S.,Chonbuk National University | Amna T.,Chonbuk National University | Al-Deyab S.S.,King Saud University | Kim H.-C.,Korean Institute for Knit Industry | And 2 more authors.
Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects | Year: 2012

This study presents the fabrication and characterization of novel cerium oxide-titanium dioxide (Ce2O3-TiO2) composite nanofibers and their bactericidal activity. The utilized Ce2O3-TiO2 nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of a sol-gel composed of cerium nitrate hexahydrate, titanium isopropoxide and poly(vinyl acetate). The physicochemical characterization of the synthesized composite nanofibers was carried out by X-ray diffraction pattern, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron probe micro-analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The antibacterial activity was tested against two most common foodborne pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) and Salmonella typhimurium (Gram-negative). Bactericidal effects were determined by MIC measurements and transmission electron microscopy respectively. Our results suggested that the lowest concentration of Ce2O3-TiO2 nanofibers which inhibits the growth of tested strains was found to be 10μg/ml. TEM analysis demonstrated that the exposure of pathogenic strains to the electrospun nanofibers leads to disruption of cell membranes which cause bacteria to die eventually. Moreover, the current results showed superior antimicrobial action of Ce2O3-TiO2 than pristine TiO2 nanofibers which might be due to the obvious impact of Ce2O3 doping into TiO2. In conclusion, novel Ce(III) oxide-titania nanofibers which possess a large surface volume were fabricated as a microbial growth inhibitor with excellent antimicrobial activity. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Hassan M.S.,Chonbuk National University | Amna T.,Chonbuk National University | Pandeya D.R.,Chonbuk National University | Hamza A.M.,Chonbuk National University | And 3 more authors.
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology | Year: 2012

Mn 2O 3 nanowires with diameter ∼70 nm were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method using Mn(II) nitrate as precursor. X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques were employed to study structural features and chemical composition of the synthesized nanowires. A biological evaluation of the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of Mn 2O 3 nanowires was carried out using Escherichia coli and mouse myoblast C 2C 12 cells as model organism and cell lines, respectively. The antibacterial activity and the acting mechanism of Mn 2O 3 nanowires were investigated by using growth inhibition studies and analyzing the morphology of the bacterial cells following the treatment with nanowires. These results suggest that the pH is critical factor affecting the morphology and production of the Mn 2O 3 nanowires. Method developed in the present study provided optimum production of Mn 2O 3 nanowires at pH∼9. The Mn 2O 3 nanowires showed significant antibacterial activity against the E. coli strain, and the lowest concentration of Mn 2O 3 nanowires solution inhibiting the growth of E. coli was found to be 12.5 μg/ml. TEM analysis demonstrated that the exposure of the selected microbial strains to the nanowires led to disruption of the cell membranes and leakage of the internal contents. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity results showed that the inhibition of C 2C 12 increases with the increase in concentration of Mn 2O 3 nanowires. Our results for the first time highlight the cytotoxic and bactericidal potential of Mn 2O 3 nanowires which can be utilized for various biomedical applications. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Hassan M.S.,Chonbuk National University | Hassan M.S.,Albaha University | Amna T.,Chonbuk National University | Amna T.,Albaha University | And 3 more authors.
Current Applied Physics | Year: 2015

Pollutants from textile industries into water-bodies have caused huge environmental hazards. The semiconductor mediated photocatalytic purification of polluted water is a promising environmental remediation technology. In the present study MnWO4-TiO2 composite nanoflowers endowed with efficient photocatalytic activity have been successfully synthesized by facile hydrothermal approach. XRD, SEM, TEM, EDX spectroscopy and UV-DRS were used to characterize the as-synthesized samples. The average size of composite nanoflower is ∼2 μm while the nanorods constructing the nanoflowers had the average diameters of 90 nm. The photocatalytic activity of the MnWO4-TiO2 nanoflowers for the degradation of methyl orange (MO) in visible light was much higher than of pristine TiO2 nanorods and MnWO4 nanoflowers respectively. The superior photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the formation of a MnWO4-TiO2 heterojunction in the MnWO4-TiO2 nanoflowers. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Hassan M.S.,Chonbuk National University | Amna T.,Chonbuk National University | Mishra A.,Chonbuk National University | Yun S.-I.,Chonbuk National University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology | Year: 2012

This study is aimed at the synthesis and characterization of novel Titania nanorods by sol-gel electrospinning technique. The physicochemical properties of the synthesized nanorods were determined by FE-SEM, EDX, TEM, TGA and XRD. We investigated the photocatalytic activity of Titania nanorods for degrading Rhodamine 6G dye and discussed the antibacterial activity and interaction mechanism against four pathogenic bacteria viz., S. aureus, E. coli, S. typhimurium and K. pneumoniae by taking five different concentrations (5-45 μg/mL). The antibacterial effect of electrospun Titania nanorods was tested both in liquid culture and on agar plates. Our investigation reveals that the lowest concentration of Titania nanorods solution inhibiting the growth of microbial strain was found to be 5 μg/mL for all the tested pathogens. The photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanorods showed better performance for dye degradation than commercially available P25. Moreover, Bio-TEM examination demonstrated that the exposure of the selected microbial strains to the Titania nanorods led to disruption of the cell membranes and leakage of the cytoplasm which cause bacteria to die eventually. Our results point the oxidative attack from exterior to the interior of the bacteria by hydroxyl radicals as the primary mechanism of photocatalytic inactivation. Copyright © 2012 American Scientific Publishers All rights reserved.


Hassan M.S.,Chonbuk National University | Amna T.,Chonbuk National University | Yang O.-B.,Chonbuk National University | Kim H.-C.,Korean Institute for Knit Industry | Khil M.-S.,Chonbuk National University
Ceramics International | Year: 2012

In the present study rare earth doped (Ln 3+-TiO 2, Ln = La, Ce and Nd) TiO 2 nanofibers were prepared by the sol-gel electrospinning method and characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, TEM, and UV-DRS. The photocatalytic activity of the samples was evaluated by Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye degradation under UV light irradiation. XRD analysis showed that all the synthesized pure and doped titania nanofibers contain pure anatase phase at 500 °C but at 700 °C it shows both anatase and rutile phase. XRD result also shows that Ln 3+-doped titania probably inhibits the phase transformation. The diameter of nanofibers for all samples ranges from 200 to 700 nm. It was also observed that the presence of rare-earth oxides in the host TiO 2 could decrease the band gap and accelerate the separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs, which eventually led to higher photocatalytic activity. To sum up, our study demonstrates that Ln 3+-doped TiO 2 samples exhibit higher photocatalytic activity than pure TiO 2 whereas Nd 3+-doped TiO 2 catalyst showed the highest photocatalytic activity among the rare earth doped samples. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Techna Group S.r.l. All rights reserved.


Ha Y.-M.,Chonbuk National University | Amna T.,Chonbuk National University | Kim M.-H.,Chonbuk National University | Kim H.-C.,Korean Institute for Knit Industry | And 2 more authors.
Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces | Year: 2013

This study presents the fabrication of novel porous silicificated PVAc/POSS composite nanofibers by facile electrospinning technique and the interaction of synthesized mats with simulated body fluid (SBF). The physicochemical properties of the electrospun composites were determined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron probe micro-analysis, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry analysis. To examine the in vitro cytotoxicity, mouse myoblast C2C12 cells were treated with pristine and composite nanofibrous mats and the viability of cells was analyzed by cell counting kit-8 assay at regular time intervals. Our results indicated the enhanced nucleation and the formation of apatite-like structures at the surface of silicificated PVAc/POSS during the incubation of electrospun mats in SBF solution. Cytotoxicity experiments designated that the myoblasts could attach to the composite after being cultured. We observed in the present study that PVAc/POSS nanofibrous mat could support cell adhesion and guide the spreading behavior of myoblasts. We conclude that the new electrospun silicificated PVAc/POSS composite scaffold with unique porous morphology have excellent biocompatibility. Consequently, our investigation results showed that the as-spun porous PVAc/POSS composite nanofibrous scaffold could be a potential substrate for the proliferation and mineralization of osteoblasts, enhancing bone regeneration. The biocomposite mats represent a promising biomaterial to be exploited for various tissue engineering applications such as guided bone regeneration. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

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