Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Kim G.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | Kang S.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | Cho K.H.,Chungnam National Hospital | Ryu J.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Precision Engineering and Manufacturing | Year: 2013

The aim of this study was to determine whether gait training using powered gait orthosis (PGO) improved gait function in paraplegics following spinal cord injury (SCI) and whether it suppressed related complications. Three complete SCI patients were used as case studies and put through four months of the gait training. The parameters of gait function-namely, velocity, step length, and cadence-were evaluated by three-dimensional motion analysis. The body fat mass (BFM) and the bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur were also measured. Velocity, cadence and step length were observed to significantly improve (p = 0.026, 0.039, 0.013, respectively) after four months of PGO gait training; furthermore, there were increments in all the subjects. BFM also significantly decreased (p = 0.004), but there was no significant change in body weight (p = 0.072), although a decrease was observed in all the subjects. Moreover, no significant change in BMD was observed (p = 0.221), although there was an increment in all the subjects. These results showed that gait training using PGO contributed to not only improving gait function in SCI patients but also suppressing increase in body fat mass and bone loss. © 2013 Korean Society for Precision Engineering and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Ko C.-Y.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | Chang Y.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | Kim S.-B.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | Kim S.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | And 3 more authors.
Physiology and Behavior | Year: 2015

Vibrotactile stimulation (VS) is widely used in the biomedical and biomechanics fields. Most studies have attempted to verify the effects and/or function of VS, but few studies have evaluated emotional response (ER) to VS, although emotions play a critical role in human behavior. This study aimed to evaluate the subjective response (SR) to VS in young, elderly, and amputee adults and to verify whether VS on the forearm evokes displeasure. Twenty-four young adults (YM: male 13, YF: female 11), 31 elderly subjects (EM: male 15, EF: female 16), and 19 transradial amputees (AM: male 11, AF: female 8) participated. Eight equally spaced vibration motors were attached around the circumference of the forearm (channels 1-4 on the lateral site and channels 5-8 on the medial site) and were located 25% of the proximal forearm. Vibration stimuli with frequencies ranging from 37. Hz to 258. Hz were applied. An SR 10-level test and ER (displeasure or not) test were performed. In all 3 groups, SRs to the lateral site were higher than those to the medial site (YM group, p<. 0.001; YF group, p= 0.002; EM group, p<. 0.001; EF group, p= 0.031; AM group, p<. 0.001; AF group, p= 0.021). Additionally, SRs were saturated at certain frequencies (YM group, 149. Hz; YF and EM groups, 198. Hz; EF and AM groups, 120. Hz; AF group, 176. Hz). Several subjects (YM group, 7; YF group, 4; EM group, 2; EF group, 6; AM group, 3; AF group, 1) expressed displeasure, and ERs were different according to sex, age, or amputation. As a result, the lateral site was more sensitive to VS than the medial site, regardless of sex, age, or amputation. Furthermore, VS may evoke displeasure. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. Source


Ko C.-Y.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | Chang Y.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | Kim S.-B.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | Kim S.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Biomechanical Engineering | Year: 2014

Numerous studies have reported the efficacy of vibration in sensory feedback or substitution devices for users of myoelectric hand prostheses. Although most myoelectric hand prostheses are presently manipulated by a surface electromyogram (sEMG), only a few studies have been conducted on the effect of vibration on an sEMG. This study aimed to determine whether vibration stimulation affects the linear and nonlinear properties of surface electromyography (sEMG) considering the skin properties. The vibration stimuli, with frequencies ranging from 37 to 258 Hz, were applied to the proximal part of the arms of the eight female and seven male subjects. The skinfold thickness, hardness, and vibration threshold at the stimuli loci were measured. The root mean square (rms) and fractal dimension (DF) of the sEMG were measured at a distance of 1 cm in the upward direction from the stimuli loci. Above 223 Hz there were no differences between the rms of the genders in between the vibration stimuli (p > 0.05). Moreover, no differences were observed between the DF of the genders for any frequency (p > 0.05). Above 149 Hz, there were correlations between the rms and the skin hardness in the females. Otherwise, no correlations were observed between the rms and DF and the skin properties in both genders for most of the frequencies (all p > 0.05). These results suggest that vibration stimuli affect the linear properties of the sEMG, but not the nonlinear properties. © 2014 by ASME. Source


Ko C.-Y.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | Kim S.-B.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | Choi H.-J.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | Chang Y.,Korea Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Center | And 5 more authors.
Clinical Interventions in Aging | Year: 2014

Background: Patients with hand and/or wrist pathology are recommended to have a four-wheeled walker with an arm rest (FWW-AR) rather than a standard walker or a standard four-wheeled walker (FWW). However, only a few quantitative studies have been performed to compare upper and lower extremity weight bearing. The aim of this study was to evaluate forearm and foot weight bearing using a FWW-AR and the effect of the armrest height.Methods: Eleven elderly women (mean age 80.1±5.3 years; mean height 148.5±4.0 cm; mean weight 51.2±9.0 kg) were enrolled. The subjects walked with an FWW-AR, with the elbow in either 90 degree (D90) or 130 degree (D130) flexion, for a distance of 10 m. Surface electromyographic signals were recorded for the upper, middle, and lower trapezius, anterior deltoid, and erector spinae muscles; walking velocity was measured with the subjects weight bearing on their feet and forearms while walking. Simultaneously, the maximum plantar and forearm loads during walking with an FWW-AR were measured.Results: The normalized foot plantar loads were lower at D90 than at D130, while the normalized forearm load was higher at D90 than at D130 (all P<0.05; left foot, 7.9±0.1 N/kg versus 8.8±0.1 N/kg; right foot, 8.6±0.2 N/kg versus. 9.6±0.1 N/kg; left forearm, 1.8±0.5 N/kg versus 0.8±0.2 N/kg; and right forearm, 2.0±0.5 N/kg versus 1.0±0.2 N/kg, respectively). The surface electromyographic activity of the muscles involved in shoulder elevation and the walking velocity were both lower with the elbow at D90 than at D130 (all P<0.05; left upper trapezius, 98.7%±19.5% versus 132.6%±16.9%; right upper trapezius, 83.4%±10.6% versus 108.1%±10.5%; left anterior deltoid, 94.1%±12.8% versus 158.6%±40.4%; right anterior deltoid, 99.1%±15.0% versus 151.9%±19.4%; and velocity, 0.6±0.1 m/sec versus 0.7±0.1 m/sec, respectively).Conclusion: Weight bearing on the lower extremities is significantly reduced when the upper extremities are supported during walking with an FWW-AR. Furthermore, the weight bearing profile is dependent on the armrest height. © 2014 Ko et al. Source

Discover hidden collaborations