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Lee C.-B.,Korea Green Promotion Agency | Chun J.-H.,Korea forest Research Institute | Um T.-W.,Sangji University | Cho H.-J.,Korea Forest Ecosystems Institute
Journal of Ecology and Environment | Year: 2013

Altitudinal patterns of plant species richness and the effects of area, the mid-domain effect, climatic variables, net primary productivity and latitude on observed richness patterns along the ridge of the Baekdudaegan Mountains, South Korea were studied. Data were collected from 1,100 plots along a 200 to 1,900 m altitudinal gradient on the ridge. A total of 802 plant species from 97 families and 342 genera were recorded. Common and rare species accounted for 91% and 9%, respectively, of the total plant species. The altitudinal patterns of species richness for total, common and rare plants showed distinctly hump-shaped patterns, although the absolute altitudes of the richness peaks varied somewhat among plant groups. The mid-domain effect was the most powerful explanatory variable for total and common species richness, whereas climatic variables were better predictors for rare plant richness. No effect of latitude on species richness was observed. Our study suggests that the mid-domain effect is a better predictor for wide-ranging species such as common species, whereas climatic variables are more important factors for range-restricted species such as rare species. The mechanisms underlying these richness patterns may reflect fundamental differences in the biology and ecology of different plant groups. © 2013 The Ecological Society of Korea. Source


Cho Y.-C.,Korea National Arboretum | Pee J.H.,Seoul Womens University | Kim G.S.,Seoul Womens University | Koo B.-Y.,Seoul Womens University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Ecology and Field Biology | Year: 2011

Effects of forest thinning on community level properties have not been understood yet in Korea. We investigated regeneration patterns and trajectories after a disturbance by applying a chronosequence approach. Light availability, litter and woody debris cover, and species composition were determined for twenty 50 m line-transect samples representing a disturbance duration gradient (within 11 years). Environmental factors such as light availability and coverage of woody debris and litter changed abruptly after thinning and then returned to the pre-disturbance state. Although species richness was gained at shrub and ground layer in a limited way in both forests, cover of various functional types revealed diversity in their responses. Notably, Alnus firma stands exhibited a larger increment of cover in woody plants. Ordination analysis revealed different regeneration trajectories between natural and planted stands. Based on ordination analysis, rehabilitated stands showed movement to alternative states compared with natural ones, reflecting lower resilience to perturbation (i.e., lower stability). Our results suggest that community resilience to artificial thinning depends on properties of the dominant species. But to get more explanatory ecological information, longer-term static observations are required. © The Ecological Society of Korea. Source


Lee C.-B.,Korea Green Promotion Agency | Chun J.-H.,Korea forest Research Institute | Song H.-K.,Chungnam National University | Cho H.-J.,Korea Forest Ecosystems Institute
Ecological Research | Year: 2013

We studied the altitudinal patterns of plant species richness and examined the effects of geometric constraints, area, and climatic factors on the observed richness patterns along the ridge of the Baekdudaegan Mountains, South Korea. Rapoport's altitudinal rule was evaluated by examining the relationship between altitudinal range size and midpoint. We also examined the latitudinal effect on species richness. Plant data were collected from 1,100 plots along a 200-1,900 m altitudinal gradient along the ridge of the Baekdudaegan. A total of 802 plant species from 97 families and 342 genera were found. The altitudinal patterns of plant species richness along the ridge of the Baekdudaegan depicted distinctly hump-shaped patterns, although the absolute altitudes of the richness peaks vary somewhat among plant groups. While the mid-domain effect (MDE) was the most powerful explanatory variable in simple regression models, species richness was also associated with climatic factors, especially mean annual precipitation (MAP) and temperature (MAT) in multiple regression models. The relative importance of the MDE and climatic factors were different among plant groups. The MDE was more important for woody plants and for large-ranged species, whereas climatic factors were better predictors for total and herbaceous plants and for small-ranged species. Rapoport's altitudinal rule and a latitudinal effect on species richness were not supported. Our study suggests that a combined interaction of the MDE and climatic factors influences species richness patterns along the altitudinal gradient of the Baekdudaegan Mountains, South Korea. © 2012 The Ecological Society of Japan. Source

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