Kopenhagen Fur

Glostrup, Denmark

Kopenhagen Fur

Glostrup, Denmark
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Dam-Tuxen R.,Kopenhagen Fur | Dahl J.,Danish Agriculture and Food Council | Jensen T.H.,Kopenhagen Fur | Dam-Tuxen T.,Kopenhagen Fur | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Virological Methods | Year: 2014

Aleutian disease (AD) is a severe disease characterized by hypergammaglobulinemia causing multiple symptoms such as acute renal failure, arteritis, reduced reproductive performance and pneumonia in mink. AD is caused by the parvovirus Aleutian mink disease virus (ADV) and diagnosed primarily based on ADV serology sometimes supplemented by organ PCR analysis. In Denmark, approximately 3.5-4 million serum samples are tested every year for the presence of anti ADV antibodies as part of a national eradication program. The present study compares the diagnostic performance of the two most commonly used assays for serological screening for Aleutian disease: counter current immunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) and ELISA. In total, 3810 mink were sampled in doublets and analyzed by CIEP and a newly developed fully automated ELISA. The results show that the two assays have a comparable diagnostic performance with the ELISA having a higher sensitivity but lower specificity than the CIEP assay. The ELISA has been approved by the Danish authorities for diagnosing Aleutian disease in mink. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Ryt-Hansen P.,Technical University of Denmark | Hjulsager C.K.,Technical University of Denmark | Hagberg E.E.,Kopenhagen fur | Chriel M.,Technical University of Denmark | And 3 more authors.
Virology Journal | Year: 2017

Background: Aleutian Mink Disease (AMD) is an infectious disease of mink (Neovison vison) and globally a major cause of economic losses in mink farming. The disease is caused by Aleutian Mink Disease Virus (AMDV) that belongs to the genus Amdoparvovirus within the Parvoviridae family. Several strains have been described with varying virulence and the severity of infection also depends on the host's genotype and immune status. Clinical signs include respiratory distress in kits and unthriftiness and low quality of the pelts. The infection can also be subclinical. Systematic control of AMDV in Danish mink farms was voluntarily initiated in 1976. Over recent decades the disease was mainly restricted to the very northern part of the country (Northern Jutland), with only sporadic outbreaks outside this region. Most of the viruses from this region have remained very closely related at the nucleotide level for decades. However, in 2015, several outbreaks of AMDV occurred at mink farms throughout Denmark, and the sources of these outbreaks were not known. Methods: Partial NS1 gene sequencing, phylogenetic analyses data were utilized along with epidemiological to determine the origin of the outbreaks. Results: The phylogenetic analyses of partial NS1 gene sequences revealed that the outbreaks were caused by two different clusters of viruses that were clearly different from the strains found in Northern Jutland. These clusters had restricted geographical distribution, and the variation within the clusters was remarkably low. The outbreaks on Zealand were epidemiologically linked and a close sequence match was found to two virus sequences from Sweden. The other cluster of outbreaks restricted to Jutland and Funen were linked to three feed producers (FP) but secondary transmissions between farms in the same geographical area could not be excluded. Conclusion: This study confirmed that partial NS1 sequencing can be used in outbreak tracking to determine major viral clusters of AMDV. Using this method, two new distinct AMDV clusters with low intra-cluster sequence diversity were identified, and epidemiological data helped to reveal possible ways of viral introduction into the affected herds. © 2017 The Author(s).


Jensen V.F.,Technical University of Denmark | Sommer H.M.,Technical University of Denmark | Struve T.,Kopenhagen Fur | Clausen J.,Kopenhagen Fur | Chriel M.,Technical University of Denmark
Preventive Veterinary Medicine | Year: 2017

Feed quality is generally assumed to affect health status in animal production. In previous studies, the feed producer has been found to affect the occurrence of gastrointestinal disease and antimicrobial use in Mink (Neovison vison). Mink are fed with moist, freshly produced feed, based on perishable ingredients. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential effect of specific feed parameters on antimicrobial use on herd level. The study was cross-sectional, including 1472 mink herds, responsible for 97% of oral antimicrobials prescribed for Danish mink during the study period, 2012–2014. Data were obtained from the national veterinary prescription database (VetStat), Kopenhagen Fur database, and the Voluntary Feed Control (Mink producers Organization). All feed batches subject to feed control were included. A multi-variable variance analysis was carried out analysing the effect of the feed parameters total volatile nitrogen, dry matter, crude protein and fat; total bacterial count (21 °C), and counts of sulphite producing bacteria (21 °C), Clostridium spp., faecal cocci (FC) (44 °C), yeast, and mould; presence of Salmonella spp. and Clostridium perfringens (dichotome). Three outcome variables were applied: prescription of oral antimicrobial on herd level within time slots of 3, 5 or 7 days after feeding of an included batch. Two binomial models were developed, adjusting for significant effects (p < 0.0001) of Ps. aeruginosa infection, herd size, month (season) and year. Antimicrobial prescription was significantly (p < 0.0001) associated with FC (all time slots, both models). A negative association (p < 0.0001) with crude protein on antimicrobial prescription within a 7 day slot suggested an association between low content of crude protein and antimicrobial use. The associations need to be confirmed in controlled studies, and ideally, potential causalities should be investigated. The perspective of such findings could be the development of tests for control of feed ingredients prior to use in the feed production. © 2017 The Authors


Pujolar J.M.,University of Aarhus | Jacobsen M.W.,University of Aarhus | Frydenberg J.,University of Aarhus | Als T.D.,Technical University of Denmark | And 7 more authors.
Molecular Ecology Resources | Year: 2013

Reduced representation genome sequencing such as restriction-site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing is finding increased use to identify and genotype large numbers of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in model and nonmodel species. We generated a unique resource of novel SNP markers for the European eel using the RAD sequencing approach that was simultaneously identified and scored in a genome-wide scan of 30 individuals. Whereas genomic resources are increasingly becoming available for this species, including the recent release of a draft genome, no genome-wide set of SNP markers was available until now. The generated SNPs were widely distributed across the eel genome, aligning to 4779 different contigs and 19 703 different scaffolds. Significant variation was identified, with an average nucleotide diversity of 0.00529 across individuals. Results varied widely across the genome, ranging from 0.00048 to 0.00737 per locus. Based on the average nucleotide diversity across all loci, long-term effective population size was estimated to range between 132 000 and 1 320 000, which is much higher than previous estimates based on microsatellite loci. The generated SNP resource consisting of 82 425 loci and 376 918 associated SNPs provides a valuable tool for future population genetics and genomics studies and allows for targeting specific genes and particularly interesting regions of the eel genome. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Jensen V.F.,Technical University of Denmark | Sommer H.M.,Technical University of Denmark | Struve T.,Kopenhagen Fur | Clausen J.,Kopenhagen Fur | Chriel M.,Technical University of Denmark
Preventive Veterinary Medicine | Year: 2016

The American mink (Neovison vison) is used for commercial fur production in Denmark. In recent years, antimicrobial prescription for Danish mink has been increasing. In this study, the patterns and trends in antimicrobial use in mink were described and a multi-variable variance analysis was carried out with the objective of identifying risk factors for antimicrobial use on herd level. The study was based on register data for 2007-2012. Information on antimicrobial use was obtained from the national database VetStat, monitoring all medicinal products used for animals on prescription level. Data on microbiological feed quality was obtained from the Voluntary Feed Control under the Mink producers Organization, and data on herd size and the relation between farm and feed producer was obtained from the registers at Kopenhagen Fur, based on yearly reporting from the mink producers. Descriptive analysis showed a clear significant effect of season on antimicrobial use, with a peak in "treatment proportions", TP (defined daily doses per kg biomass-days) in May, around the time of whelping, and a high level in the following months. In autumn, a minor peak in antimicrobial use occurred throughout the study period. From 2007 to 2011, a 102% increase in annual antimicrobial TP was noted; on herd level, the increase was associated with an increasing frequency of prescription, and a decrease in the amounts prescribed in months with prescription. A binomial model showed that on herd level, the annual number of months with antimicrobial prescription was significantly (p < 0.01) affected by feed producer, veterinarian, disease (specific laboratory diagnosis) infection, herd size and year, with an interaction between feed producer and year. A log-normal model showed that in months with antimicrobial use, the TP on herd level was significantly (p < 0.001) affected by year, month (season), feed producer, feed quality score, veterinarian, herd size and laboratory confirmed diagnosis of specific infections; additionally the interaction terms year × feed producer and herd size × month were significant (p < 0.001).In conclusion, antimicrobial use on herd level was significantly associated with the microbiological food quality, the feed producer, and the veterinarian. The prescription patterns varied significantly between veterinarians, and some veterinarians were associated with both larger and more frequent prescriptions of antimicrobials at herd level. Herd size is associated with different prescription patterns. Finally, infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, astrovirus, influenza virus and Salmonella spp. was associated with an increase in antimicrobial use. © 2016 The Authors.


Espregueira Themudo G.,University of Southern Denmark | Houe H.,Copenhagen University | Agger J.F.,Copenhagen University | Ostergaard J.,Kopenhagen Fur | Ersboll A.K.,University of Southern Denmark
Preventive Veterinary Medicine | Year: 2012

Eradication of Aleutian disease was initiated in Denmark in 1976. The prevalence of positive farms has since then been reduced from 100% to only being continuously present in the region of Vendsyssel, Northern Denmark since 2004. In this study, we attempted to identify risk factors for the infection in this region based on logistic regression of spatial (environmental, neighbourhood) variables and biosecurity measures. Information on potential biosecurity (management) risk factors in the region was obtained from interviews in 342 registered farms in the region using a structured questionnaire. A total of 279 questionnaires were completed (response rate 82%). Additional spatial variables were included in the analysis. The study shows that farm size (the number of animals in the farm) and proportion of infected neighbouring farms were significant risk factors for infection with Aleutian Mink Disease Virus. These factors account for 35% of the variation of the infection status of mink farms located in Vendsyssel during 2009. These results indicate that only a coordinated effort from the farmers in the area will succeed in eradicating the disease from Denmark, because individual farms that have eradicated the disease will be at risk of re-infection from test-positive neighbours. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Themudo G.E.,Copenhagen University | Ostergaard J.,Kopenhagen Fur | Ersboll A.K.,University of Southern Denmark
Preventive Veterinary Medicine | Year: 2011

Aleutian disease (Plasmacytosis) is caused by the Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV), an autonomous parvovirus and affects many mustelid species, including the American mink (Neovisonvison). In Denmark, an eradication program reduced the prevalence of test-positive farms from 100% in 1976 to 15% in 1996. Nevertheless, the disease persists in the Vendsyssel district of Northern Jutland, despite the eradication efforts.In this study, we used spatial epidemiological analysis to test for spatial autocorrelation of the distribution of farms positive for the disease. We investigated 2375 farms in Denmark (342 of which were located in the Vendsyssel district), during the period 2000-2008. For the purpose of our study, a farm was considered positive when, on any test conducted in a year, at least three animals were tested positive. To detect spatial clusters, we performed a retrospective analysis with spatial scan statistics. We performed one analysis for each of the nine years (2000-2008). A separate analysis was conducted with only the farms in Vendsyssel included. The spatial cluster analysis revealed a significant cluster throughout the time period studied in Northern Jutland. The only exception was 2002 when an outbreak was detected in the southern part of Jutland, and not in the north. The farm-level prevalence of the disease in Denmark was highest in this year, suggesting that the outbreak in the south could have masked the persistent signal from the north; the northern cluster was still significant when analysing only the Vendsyssel populations. These results confirm that Northern Jutland continues to have a significantly higher number of cases than expected if the disease was randomly distributed. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Kopenhagen Fur and Copenhagen University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Veterinary pathology | Year: 2016

The aim of this study was to evaluate gross and histologic lesions and epidemiologic factors of foot lesions in farmed mink. The feet of 1159 mink from 4 Danish farms were examined and lesions described. Swabs from the lesions were taken from 27 mink for microbiology, and tissue samples from a representative spectrum of feet with and without lesions (n= 22) were examined histologically. Feet were grouped according to gross inspection: no lesions (55.1%), hair loss (7.1%), hyperkeratosis (35.8%), and crusting (5.3%). Lesions were predominantly located in plantar metatarsal skin (98.1%). Staphylococci were the most prevalent microorganisms cultured from the lesions. There was a significant association between presence of lesions and sex (P< .0001), age (P< .0001), and color type (P= .023). Lesion size was significantly different between hair loss and crusts and between hyperkeratosis and crusts (P< .0001). Histologically, lesions included varying degrees of orthokeratotic to parakeratotic hyperkeratosis and granulomatous to pyogranulomatous dermatitis with trichogranulomas as a dominant feature in all mink. The gross and microscopic lesions were comparable to physically induced changes in other species that develop as a response to repetitive friction or pressure. The condition may have an impact on animal welfare in mink production.


PubMed | Kopenhagen Fur and Copenhagen University
Type: | Journal: Acta veterinaria Scandinavica | Year: 2016

Wounds are regarded as an indicator of reduced welfare in mink production; however, information on the occurrence and significance of wounds is sparse. To provide a basis for assessment and classification of wounds in farmed mink, the distribution pattern and characteristics of wounds in farmed mink in June and October, respectively, is described. A total of 791 and 660 mink from 6 to 12 Danish mink farms, respectively, were examined. The mink were either found dead or were euthanized due to injury or other disease. Mink included from June were kits in the pre-weaning and weaning period (1-2months old). Mink included from October were juveniles in the late growth period (approximately 5-6months old) or older. Macroscopic pathology and wound location was systematically recorded.There was considerable variation in morphology as well as location of wounds between June and October. Wounds were primarily located on the front parts of the body and in the head in June (1-2month old kits) and mainly on the rear parts of the body and on the tail in October (5-6month old kits and older). Moreover, there were significantly more females than males with wounds for most wound types, and significant differences in occurrence of ear and tail base wounds between certain colour types.Wounds varied significantly from June to October with respect to morphology and anatomical location. Wounds in June were primarily located on the front parts of the body and in the head, while wounds in October were mainly present on the hind parts of the body and on the tail. The majority of the wounds were found in specific well defined skin areas and could therefore be grouped into categories according to anatomical location.


PubMed | Kopenhagen Fur and Technical University of Denmark
Type: | Journal: Preventive veterinary medicine | Year: 2016

The American mink (Neovison vison) is used for commercial fur production in Denmark. In recent years, antimicrobial prescription for Danish mink has been increasing. In this study, the patterns and trends in antimicrobial use in mink were described and a multi-variable variance analysis was carried out with the objective of identifying risk factors for antimicrobial use on herd level. The study was based on register data for 2007-2012. Information on antimicrobial use was obtained from the national database VetStat, monitoring all medicinal products used for animals on prescription level. Data on microbiological feed quality was obtained from the Voluntary Feed Control under the Mink producers Organization, and data on herd size and the relation between farm and feed producer was obtained from the registers at Kopenhagen Fur, based on yearly reporting from the mink producers. Descriptive analysis showed a clear significant effect of season on antimicrobial use, with a peak in treatment proportions, TP (defined daily doses per kg biomass-days) in May, around the time of whelping, and a high level in the following months. In autumn, a minor peak in antimicrobial use occurred throughout the study period. From 2007 to 2011, a 102% increase in annual antimicrobial TP was noted; on herd level, the increase was associated with an increasing frequency of prescription, and a decrease in the amounts prescribed in months with prescription. A binomial model showed that on herd level, the annual number of months with antimicrobial prescription was significantly (p<0.01) affected by feed producer, veterinarian, disease (specific laboratory diagnosis) infection, herd size and year, with an interaction between feed producer and year. A log-normal model showed that in months with antimicrobial use, the TP on herd level was significantly (p<0.001) affected by year, month (season), feed producer, feed quality score, veterinarian, herd size and laboratory confirmed diagnosis of specific infections; additionally the interaction terms yearfeed producer and herd sizemonth were significant (p<0.001). In conclusion, antimicrobial use on herd level was significantly associated with the microbiological food quality, the feed producer, and the veterinarian. The prescription patterns varied significantly between veterinarians, and some veterinarians were associated with both larger and more frequent prescriptions of antimicrobials at herd level. Herd size is associated with different prescription patterns. Finally, infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, astrovirus, influenza virus and Salmonella spp. was associated with an increase in antimicrobial use.

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