Seoul, South Korea
Seoul, South Korea

Konkuk University is a private university located in Seoul and Chungju. The Seoul campus is located in the southeastern part of Seoul, near the Han River, and is served by a metro station of the same name. The university possesses accreditation from the South Korean Ministry of Culture and Education. The university emphasizes technology and science majors and research. Wikipedia.


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Disclosed are a nanopipette provided with a membrane containing a saturated ion-sensitive material, a method for preparing the same, and an ion measuring apparatus comprising the same.


Patent
Konkuk University and KR Biotech Co. | Date: 2017-02-15

The present invention relates to an anti-influenza virus composition containing a Poncirus trifoliata extract as an active ingredient. The composition of the present invention inhibits influenza virus replication and infection, thereby exhibiting excellent effects in the prevention and treatment of influenza virus infection. The present invention provides a composition for preventing, treating, or alleviating diseases caused by influenza virus.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

An eco-friendly method to synthesize DNA-copper nanoflowers with high load efficiencies, low cytotoxicity, and strong resistance against nucleases has been developed by Professor Hyun Gyu Park in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and his collaborators. The research team successfully formed a flower-shaped nanostructure in an eco-friendly condition by using interactions between copper ions and DNA containing amide and amine groups. The resulting nanoflowers exhibit high DNA loading capacities in addition to low cytotoxicity. Flower-shaped nanocrystals called nanoflowers have gained attention for their distinct features of high surface roughness and high surface area to volume ratios. The nanoflowers have been used in many areas including catalysis, electronics, and analytical chemistry. Of late, research breakthroughs were made in the generation of hybrid inorganic-organic nanoflowers containing various enzymes as organic components. The hybridization with inorganic materials greatly enhanced enzymatic activity, stability, and durability compared to the corresponding free enzymes. Generally, the formation of protein nanocrystals requires high heat treatment so it has limitations for achieving the high loading capacities of intact DNA. The research team addressed the issue, focusing on the fact that nucleic acids with well-defined structures and selective recognition properties also contain amide and amine groups in their nucleobases. They proved that flower-like structures could be formed by using nucleic acids as a synthetic template, which paved the way to synthesize the hybrid nanoflowers containing DNA as an organic component in an eco-friendly condition. The team also confirmed that this synthetic method can be universally applied to any DNA sequences containing amide and amine groups. They said their approach is quite unique considering that the majority of previous works focused on the utilization of DNA as a linker to assemble the nanomaterials. They said the method has several advantageous features. First, the 'green' synthetic procedure doesn't involve any toxic chemicals, and shows low cytotoxicity and strong resistance against nucleases. Second, the obtained nanoflowers exhibit exceptionally high DNA loading capacities. Above all, such superior features of hybrid nanoflowers enabled the sensitive detection of various molecules including phenol, hydrogen peroxide, and glucose. DNA-copper nanoflowers showed even higher peroxidase activity than those of protein-copper nanoflowers, which may be due to the larger surface area of the flower- shaped structures, creating a greater chance for applying them in the field of sensing of detection of hydrogen peroxide. The research team expects that their research will create diverse applications in many areas including biosensors and will be further applied into therapeutic applications. Professor Park said, "The inorganic component in the hybrid nanoflowers not only exhibits low cytotoxicity, but also protects the encapsulated DNA from being cleaved by endonuclease enzymes. Using this feature, the nanostructure will be applied into developing gene therapeutic carriers." This research was co-led by Professor Moon Il Kim at Gachon University and KAIST graduate Ki Soo Park, currently a professor at Konkuk University, is the first author. The research was featured as the front cover article of the Journal of Materials Chemistry B on March 28, Issue 12, published by the Royal Society of Chemistry. The research was funded by the Mid-Career Researcher Support Program of the National Research Foundation of Korea and the Global Frontier Project of the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

An eco-friendly method to synthesize DNA-copper nanoflowers with high load efficiencies, low cytotoxicity, and strong resistance against nucleases has been developed by Professor Hyun Gyu Park and his collaborators in the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology’s (KAIST) Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. The research team successfully formed a flower-shaped nanostructure in an eco-friendly condition by using interactions between copper ions and DNA containing amide and amine groups. The resulting nanoflowers exhibit high DNA loading capacities in addition to low cytotoxicity. Flower-shaped nanocrystals called nanoflowers have gained attention for their distinct features of high surface roughness and high surface area to volume ratios. The nanoflowers have been used in many areas including catalysis, electronics, and analytical chemistry. Of late, research breakthroughs were made in the generation of hybrid inorganic-organic nanoflowers containing various enzymes as organic components. The hybridization with inorganic materials greatly enhanced enzymatic activity, stability, and durability compared to the corresponding free enzymes. Generally, the formation of protein nanocrystals requires high heat treatment so it has limitations for achieving the high loading capacities of intact DNA. The research team addressed the issue, focusing on the fact that nucleic acids with well-defined structures and selective recognition properties also contain amide and amine groups in their nucleobases. They proved that flower-like structures could be formed by using nucleic acids as a synthetic template, which paved the way to synthesize the hybrid nanoflowers containing DNA as an organic component in an eco-friendly condition. The team also confirmed that this synthetic method can be universally applied to any DNA sequences containing amide and amine groups. They said their approach is quite unique considering that the majority of previous works focused on the utilization of DNA as a linker to assemble the nanomaterials. They said the method has several advantageous features. First, the “green” synthetic procedure doesn’t involve any toxic chemicals, and shows low cytotoxicity and strong resistance against nucleases. Second, the obtained nanoflowers exhibit exceptionally high DNA loading capacities. Above all, such superior features of hybrid nanoflowers enabled the sensitive detection of various molecules including phenol, hydrogen peroxide, and glucose. DNA-copper nanoflowers showed even higher peroxidase activity than those of protein-copper nanoflowers, which may be due to the larger surface area of the flower- shaped structures, creating a greater chance for applying them in the field of sensing of detection of hydrogen peroxide. The research team expects that their research will create diverse applications in many areas including biosensors and will be further applied into therapeutic applications. Park says, “The inorganic component in the hybrid nanoflowers not only exhibits low cytotoxicity, but also protects the encapsulated DNA from being cleaved by endonuclease enzymes. Using this feature, the nanostructure will be applied into developing gene therapeutic carriers.” This research was co-led by Professor Moon Il Kim at Gachon University and KAIST graduate Ki Soo Park, currently a professor at Konkuk University, is the first author. The research was featured as the front cover article of the Journal of Materials Chemistry B on March 28, Issue 12, published by the Royal Society of Chemistry. The research was funded by the Mid-Career Researcher Support Program of the National Research Foundation of Korea and the Global Frontier Project of the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning.


Patent
Samsung and Konkuk University | Date: 2016-03-08

Provided are pixel circuits using organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and a driving method thereof, and an organic light emitting display including the pixel circuits. The OLED is driven to emit light by a drive transistor generating a drive current compensated with respect to a threshold voltage difference and mobility deviation. The drive transistor may receive reference voltage and data signals in response to separate scan signals supplied to the pixel circuits via different scan lines. As a result, a threshold voltage compensation time, which may include the time during which a reference voltage is supplied to the drive transistor in response to a particular scan signal, may be set long enough regardless of a time during which the data signal is supplied to the pixel circuits located in respective rows of the organic light emitting display in response to a separate scan signal.


There is provided a CMP-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase targeting vector, a transgenic animal for xenotransplantation introduced with the vector, and a method of manufacturing the same.


The present invention relates to an interleukin-2 receptor gamma (IL2RG) gene-targeting vector, a method for producing an immune cell-deficient transgenic cloned miniature pig having the vector introduced therein, and the use thereof.


Patent
Amogreentech co. and Konkuk University | Date: 2016-06-23

This disclosure provides for a three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment presenting defined physical or mechanical cues that regulate cellular behavior and use of the matrix. The disclosure also provides for devices and methods for screening for optimal combinations of physical and mechanical cues in order to create a microenvironment that can regulate specific cellular behavior such as cell growth, proliferation, migration or differentiation.


Patent
Konkuk University | Date: 2016-06-29

The present disclosure relates to a MoS_(2) thin film and a method for manufacturing the same. The present disclosure provides a MoS_(2) thin film and a method for manufacturing the same using an atomic layer deposition method. In particular, the MoS_(2) thin film is manufactured by an atomic layer deposition method without using a toxic gas such as H_(2)S as a sulfur precursor. Thus, the present disclosure is eco-friendly. Furthermore, it is possible to prevent the damage and contamination of manufacturing equipment during the manufacturing process. In addition, it is possible to manufacture the MoS_(2) thin film by precisely controlling the thickness of the MoS_(2) thin film to the level of an atomic layer.


The present invention relates to a composition for preventing or treating sepsis or septic shock including a Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived adenosine kinase (ADK) protein as an active ingredient. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived ADK protein according to one exemplary embodiment of the present invention has an effect of inhibit binding between the LPS and cells by binding to LPS, and also has an excellent therapeutic effect against sepsis by enhancing viability in a sepsis animal model and suppressing inflammatory response in the lung and cell death in the spleen.

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