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HORTEN, Norway

Trademark
Kongsberg Maritime As | Date: 2016-04-05

Apparatus and instruments for mapping, namely, electronic sensors and receivers as basis for mapping through satellite measuring and satellite photographing; apparatus and instruments for nautical mapping, namely, sonar equipment, echo sounding devices, magnetic measuring equipment for nautical mapping, namely, magnetic gyrocompasses; apparatus, instruments, systems and equipment for electronic positioning, namely, electronic navigation instruments, namely, global positioning systems, low frequency radio navigation device receivers, acoustic transducers; apparatus and instruments to determine position, namely, emergency position indicating radio beacons, GPS tracking systems, radars; apparatus and instruments for navigation of ocean-going vessels, namely, GPS navigation device and instruments, radars, and auto pilot systems, comprised of computers, computer software, transmitters, receivers and network interface devices; electronic control systems for sonar acoustic sound wave machines; electronic navigational apparatus and devices for use in positioning or measuring the location of vessels, namely, differential, absolute and relative positioning systems, differential positioning systems, relative positioning systems, and electronic control systems for use with vessel engine thrusters and rudders; hydroacoustic monitoring systems for underwater structures comprised of computer monitors, computer hardware and software, and renewable battery systems to provide backup power.


Trademark
Kongsberg Maritime As | Date: 2015-11-24

Apparatus and instruments for mapping, namely, electronic sensors and receivers as basis for mapping through satellite measuring and satellite photographing; apparatus and instruments for nautical mapping, namely, sonar equipment, echo sounding devices, magnetic measuring equipment for nautical mapping, namely, magnetic gyrocompasses; apparatus, instruments, systems and equipment for electronic positioning, namely, electronic navigation instruments, namely, global positioning systems (GPS), low frequency radio navigation device (LORAN-C) receivers, acoustic transducers; apparatus and instruments to determine position, namely, emergency position-indicating radio beacons, GPS tracking systems, radars; apparatus and instruments for navigation of ocean-going vessels, namely, GPS navigation device and instruments, radars, and auto pilot systems, comprised of computers, computer software transmitters, receivers and network interface devices; electronic control systems for sonar acoustic sound wave machines; electronic navigational apparatus and devices for use in positioning or measuring the location of vessels, namely, differential, absolute and relative positioning systems (DARPS), differential positioning systems (DPS), relative positioning systems, and electronic control systems for use with vessel thrusters and rudders; hydroacoustic monitoring systems for underwater structures.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-SEC-2007.1.7 | Award Amount: 4.26M | Year: 2008

The UAN project aims at conceiving, developing and testing at sea an innovative and operational concept for integrating in a unique system submerged, surface and aerial sensors with the objective of protecting critical infrastructures, such as off-shore platforms and energy plants. The security of such economically vital infrastructures requires an integrated approach involving underwater and land/air sensors and actuators for surveillance, monitoring and deterrence. In particular UAN focuses on a security oriented underwater wireless network infrastructure, realized by hydroacoustic communication. The UAN concept is to gather environmental information during the acoustic transmission and use it to predict the acoustic propagation conditions and the optimal obtainable performance at any given time. This information is used in the communication system for precise tuning. This tuning will take place at two different levels: i) by improving the basic point-to-point connection, by introducing physical and geometric constraints in the channel equalization and optimization process of the communication settings and ii) at the macro network configuration level by adapting node geometric configuration to the acoustic propagation conditions predicted from the environmental observations. This can be done in depth or in range by moving nodes placed on AUVs either to increase the point-to-point communication capacity or by serving as relay nodes to more distant, and at that time, inaccessible fixed nodes. This is a rather new approach that requires a better understanding of the acoustic propagation physics as well as a capacity to include that knowledge into technologically advanced communications modules and algorithms for underwater communications. The UAN project builds on a multidisciplinary consortium of technologically advanced industries, field experienced university labs and governmental agencies, thus grouping the required knowledge and experience.


News Article | April 23, 2016
Site: http://www.techtimes.com/rss/sections/robots.xml

Statoil and Kongsberg Maritime have signed an agreement with a Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) spin-off company, and developed a swimming robot called Eelume. The serpent-like robot can swim by itself and developers expect that it will play an important role in reducing the cost of maintaining undersea equipment and reduce the need for large underwater vessels. "Eelume robots will be permanently installed on the seabed and will perform planned and on-demand inspections and interventions. The solution can be installed on both existing and new fields where typical jobs include; visual inspection, cleaning, and adjusting valves and chokes. These jobs account for a large part of the total subsea inspection and intervention spend," says Kongsberg. Pål Liljebäck, the chief technical officer of Eelume, says that they have unique expertise in snake robotics and the company is the first to bring a snake-like robot to an industrial setting. Developers of Eelume suggest that it will not only enable operators to reduce cost of undersea maintenance significantly, but also offer an easy way of conducting regular task. The slender design and flexibility of these robots helps them to reach tight and restricted undersea spaces instantly whenever needed. Elisabeth Birkeland Kvalheim, chief technology officer of Statoil, suggests that Eelume is an excellent example of how innovation and new technology can work together for reducing costs. According to the Eelume website, the existing subsea infrastructure is aging and the demand for maintenance will increase in the near term. The website also indicates that subsea costs have increased by three-folds since 2005. New installation can be complex and at the same time it can be very expensive, which is concerning for operators. Eelume can come to the rescue of these operators trying to replace existing undersea infrastructure. Although, Eelume can potentially be of great use for undersea maintenance, the developers have not revealed a lot about the swimming snake robot. Some important questions such as powering these robots, the range of each charge and more remain unanswered. Operators will want to know the full details, including limitations of the robot before they are deployed to the seabeds. Check out a short video of the swimming snake robot in action. © 2016 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 21, 2016
Site: http://motherboard.vice.com/

As we’ve written about here before, nature is popular inspiration for researchers looking to develop new types of mechanical forms, and there’s seemingly no animal too biologically complex for the field of biomimetics. Now, engineers at the technology companies Eelume and Kongsberg Maritime have partnered with oil and gas corporation Statoil to mechanize the formidable sea snake. Teams of researchers had been tinkering away at the robotic sea snake for more than 10 years before finally producing something viable for its intended purpose: underwater exploration. The sleek little bot will be deployed for subsea inspections and repair operations on oil drilling machinery, according to Kongsberg Maritime. Pits of robotic sea snakes will be permanently installed at offshore drilling sites, thus eliminating the need for large, expensive maintenance ROVs—remotely operated underwater vehicles capable of performing various tasks. “Eelume is a good example of how new technology and innovation contributes to cost reduction. Instead of using large and expensive vessels for small jobs, we now introduce a flexible robot acting as a self going janitor on the seabed,” Statoil's Chief technology officer Elisabeth Birkeland Kvalheim said in a statement. The underwater robot is able to swim both by itself and with the help of thrusters, according to a video made by the technology firm NTNU. Its flexible, articulated “body” allows the sea snake to be configured for different tasks and easily navigate complex areas of machinery. Sea snake robots aren’t new, however. In 2014, mechanical engineering students at the University of Adelaide constructed a similar bot that would help biologists study marine life without having to use noisy and invasive ROVs. “Because the robot design mimics the sea snake we get this lovely feedback loop – the biology informs the design of the robot, which not only records new observations of the sea snakes but generates new information about the link between form and function,” University of Adelaide researcher told National Geographic. Terrestrial snakes, such as the sidewinder rattlesnake (Crotalus cerastes) have also inspired engineers to tackle new methods of locomotion. Researcher Howie Choset at The Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University developed a limbless bot that relied on internal movements and joint angles to shimmy up and down three dimensional terrains. Choset hopes his robot can be used to explore archaeological sites and retrieve hard-to-reach artifacts. Compared to the other uses of serpentine robotics, Statoil’s bot seems mildly less cool. While it’s neat that engineers were able to translate the sea snake’s complicated morphology into working machinery, it’s a bit of a bummer that its ultimate use will be helping an oil corporation plow the seafloor and disrupt the habitat of actual living, breathing ocean creatures.

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