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Daegu, South Korea
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Daegu, South Korea

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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

A recent study, affiliated with UNIST, has proposed the possibility of in situ human health monitoring simply by wearing a contact lens with built-in wireless smart sensors. This study has been jointly conducted by Professor Jang-Ung Park of Materials Science and Engineering, Professor Chang Young Lee of Life Science, and Professor Franklin Bien of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UNIST in collaboration with Professor Hong Kyun Kim of Ophthalmology and Professor Kwi-Hyun Bae of Internal Medicine at Kyungpook National University (KNU). In the study, the research team unveiled a smart contact lens sensor that could help monitor biomarkers for intraocular pressure (IOP), diabetes mellitus, and other health conditions. The research team expects that this research breakthrough could lead to the development of biosensors capable of detecting and treating various human diseases, and used as a component of next-generation smart contact lens-related electronic devices. Diabetes is the most common cause of high blood sugar levels. Hyperglycemia is a condition in which an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood plasma. If this condition persists for more than two hours, a patient will be diagnosed with diabetes. Since blood sugar can be measured with tears, many attempts have been made to monitor diabetes with contact lenses. Despite numerous studies in the last several decades, the biggest drawback with conventional smart contact lenses was thought to be poor wearability. The electrodes used in existing smart contact lenses are opaque, and therefore obscure the view when wearing it. Moreover, because they lens-shaped firm plastic material, many people complain of comfort issues with contact lens wear which made wearing them impossible. Park and his research team solved these issues by developing a sensor based on transparent and flexible materials. Their new smart contact lens sensors use electrodes made of highly stretchable and transparent graphene sheets and metal nanowires. Using this sensor, patients with diabetes and glaucoma may one day be able to self-monitor blood glucose levels and eye pressure. Through the embedded wireless antenna in the contact lens sensor, patients can also transmit their health information, which allows real-time monitoring of their health conditions, as well. In addition, because the system uses wireless antenna to read sensor information, no separate power source, like battery is required for the smart contact lens sensors.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: phys.org

This study has been jointly conducted by Professor Jang-Ung Park of Materials Science and Engineering, Professor Chang Young Lee of Life Science, and Professor Franklin Bien of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UNIST in collaboration with Professor Hong Kyun Kim of Ophthalmology and Professor Kwi-Hyun Bae of Internal Medicine at Kyungpook National University (KNU). In the study, the research team unveiled a smart contact lens sensor that could help monitor biomarkers for intraocular pressure (IOP), diabetes mellitus, and other health conditions. The research team expects that this research breakthrough could lead to the development of biosensors capable of detecting and treating various human diseases, and used as a component of next-generation smart contact lens-related electronic devices. Diabetes is the most common cause of high blood sugar levels. Hyperglycemia is a condition in which an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood plasma. If this condition persists for more than two hours, a patient will be diagnosed with diabetes. Since blood sugar can be measured with tears, many attempts have been made to monitor diabetes with contact lenses. Despite numerous studies in the last several decades, the biggest drawback with conventional smart contact lenses was thought to be poor wearability. The electrodes used in existing smart contact lenses are opaque, and therefore obscure the view when wearing it. Moreover, because they lens-shaped firm plastic material, many people complain of comfort issues with contact lens wear which made wearing them impossible. Professor Park and his research team solved these issues by developing a sensor based on transparent and flexible materials. Their new smart contact lens sensors use electrodes made of highly stretchable and transparent graphene sheets and metal nanowires. Using this sensor, patients with diabetes and glaucoma may one day be able to self-monitor blood glucose levels and eye pressure. Through the embedded wireless antenna in the contact lens sensor, patients can also transmit their health information, which allows real-time monitoring of their health conditions, as well. In addition, because the system uses wireless antenna to read sensor information, no separate power source, like battery is required for the smart contact lens sensors. Intraocular pressure measurement can be achieved using the dielectric layers. The dielectric layer is an electrically non-conductive layer, characterized by polarity that divides both positive and negative charges. The thickness of this layer changes from thinning as the intraocular pressure increases, to thickening as the intraocular pressure decreases. The IOP sensor, embedded in the contact lenses senses this and transmits the information to the wireless antenna. According to the research team, their newly-developed smart lenses with built-in pressure-sensing and glucose-monitoring sensors could still detect blood glucose and IOP despite the deformation of the contact lenses. The sensor characteristics were also maintained even when exposed to various substances in human tears. "It was observed that the live rabbit did not show any abnormal behavior when wearing the contact lens sensor," says Joohee Kim (Combined M.S./Ph.D. student of Materials Science and Engineering), the first author of the study. The contact lens sensor characteristics are not changed when the lens is deformed. Even when the sensor exposed to various materials in human tears the characteristics were maintained, and flexibility and stretchability were also excellent. Furthermore, since the electronic sensor is inserted into the soft contact lens, the feeling of wearing it is also excellent. "This study can be used to diagnose diseases (diabetes and glaucoma) by implementing two types of transparent electronic sensors in the production of smart contact lens sensors," said Professor Park. "We are now a step closer to the implementation of a fictional idea for a smart contact lens in the films, like "Minority Report" and "Mission: Impossible". More information: Joohee Kim et al, Wearable smart sensor systems integrated on soft contact lenses for wireless ocular diagnostics, Nature Communications (2017). DOI: 10.1038/ncomms14997


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has proposed the possibility of in situ human health monitoring simply by wearing a contact lens with built-in wireless smart sensors. This study has been jointly conducted by Professor Jang-Ung Park of Materials Science and Engineering, Professor Chang Young Lee of Life Science, and Professor Franklin Bien of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UNIST in collaboration with Professor Hong Kyun Kim of Ophthalmology and Professor Kwi-Hyun Bae of Internal Medicine at Kyungpook National University (KNU). In the study, the research team unveiled a smart contact lens sensor that could help monitor biomarkers for intraocular pressure (IOP), diabetes mellitus, and other health conditions. The research team expects that this research breakthrough could lead to the development of biosensors capable of detecting and treating various human diseases, and used as a component of next-generation smart contact lens-related electronic devices. Diabetes is the most common cause of high blood sugar levels. Hyperglycemia is a condition in which an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood plasma. If this condition persists for more than two hours, a patient will be diagnosed with diabetes. Since blood sugar can be measured with tears, many attempts have been made to monitor diabetes with contact lenses. Despite numerous studies in the last several decades, the biggest drawback with conventional smart contact lenses was thought to be poor wearability. The electrodes used in existing smart contact lenses are opaque, and therefore obscure the view when wearing it. Moreover, because they lens-shaped firm plastic material, many people complain of comfort issues with contact lens wear which made wearing them impossible. Professor Park and his research team solved these issues by developing a sensor based on transparent and flexible materials. Their new smart contact lens sensors use electrodes made of highly stretchable and transparent graphene sheets and metal nanowires. Using this sensor, patients with diabetes and glaucoma may one day be able to self-monitor blood glucose levels and eye pressure. Through the embedded wireless antenna in the contact lens sensor, patients can also transmit their health information, which allows real-time monitoring of their health conditions, as well. In addition, because the system uses wireless antenna to read sensor information, no separate power source, like battery is required for the smart contact lens sensors. Intraocular pressure measurement can be achieved using the dielectric layers. The dielectric layer is an electrically non-conductive layer, characterized by polarity that divides both positive and negative charges. The thickness of this layer changes from thinning as the intraocular pressure increases, to thickening as the intraocular pressure decreases. The IOP sensor, embedded in the contact lenses senses this and transmits the information to the wireless antenna. According to the research team, their newly-developed smart lenses with built-in pressure-sensing and glucose-monitoring sensors could still detect blood glucose and IOP despite the deformation of the contact lenses. The sensor characteristics were also maintained even when exposed to various substances in human tears. "It was observed that the live rabbit did not show any abnormal behavior when wearing the contact lens sensor," says Joohee Kim (Combined M.S./Ph.D. student of Materials Science and Engineering), the first author of the study. The contact lens sensor characteristics are not changed when the lens is deformed. Even when the sensor exposed to various materials in human tears the characteristics were maintained, and flexibility and stretchability were also excellent. Furthermore, since the electronic sensor is inserted into the soft contact lens, the feeling of wearing it is also excellent. "This study can be used to diagnose diseases (diabetes and glaucoma) by implementing two types of transparent electronic sensors in the production of smart contact lens sensors," said Professor Park. "We are now a step closer to the implementation of a fictional idea for a smart contact lens in the films, like "Minority Report" and "Mission: Impossible". The results of the study have been published in the March issue of the renowned scientific journal, Nature Communications. It was carried out with the support of the 2017 CooperVision Science and Technology (S&T) Awards Program. Joohee Kim, et al. "Wearable Smart Sensor Systems Integrated On Soft Contact Lenses For Wireless Ocular Diagnostics", Nature Communications, (2017).


Xu W.,Kyungpook National University | Bony B.A.,Kyungpook National University | Kim C.R.,Kyungpook National University | Baeck J.S.,KNU and Hospital | And 4 more authors.
Scientific Reports | Year: 2013

There is no doubt that the molecular imaging is an extremely important technique in diagnosing diseases. Dual imaging is emerging as a step forward in molecular imaging technique because it can provide us with more information useful for diagnosing diseases than single imaging. Therefore, diverse dual imaging modalities should be developed. Molecular imaging generally relies on imaging agents. Mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles could be valuable materials for dual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-fluorescent imaging (FI) because they have both excellent and diverse magnetic and fluorescent properties useful for dual MRI-FI, depending on lanthanide ions used. Since they are mixed nanoparticles, they are compact, robust, and stable, which is extremely useful for biomedical applications. They can be also easily synthesized with facile composition control. In this study, we explored three systems of ultrasmall mixed lanthanide (Dy/Eu, Ho/Eu, and Ho/Tb) oxide nanoparticles to demonstrate their usefulness as dual T 2 MRI-FI agents.


Ahmad M.W.,Kyungpook National University | Kim C.R.,Kyungpook National University | Bae J.E.,KNU | Chae K.S.,KNU | And 2 more authors.
Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects | Year: 2014

Bovine serum albumin (BSA) (Mn=66.5kD, size=14×4×4nm) is an attractive biological molecule for biomedical applications because of its water-solubility and bio-compatibility. It can also bind many ultrasmall nanoparticles (NPs) as confirmed in this study. We synthesized polyethylene glycol diacid (PEGD) coated ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles (PEGD-GNPs, the core davg=2.0nm), which were then conjugated to BSA and cleaved-BSA (C-BSA) (i.e. BSA-PEGD-GNPs and C-BSA-PEGD-GNPs) through amide bonding. Large relaxivities were observed in both aqueous sample solutions (r1=6.0s-1mM-1 and r2=28.0s-1mM-1 for BSA-PEGD-GNPs and r1=7.6s-1mM-1 and r2=22.0s-1mM-1 for C-BSA-PEGD-GNPs). Three tesla T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a mouse after the injection of an aqueous sample solution of BSA-PEGD-GNPs into a mouse tail vein revealed significant negative contrast enhancements. Large relaxivities and in vivo MR images prove that BSA-PEGD-GNPs and C-BSA-PEGD-GNPs are potential MRI contrast agents. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Jung H.,ETRI | Gohar M.,KNU | Kim J.-I.,KNU | Koh S.-J.,KNU
IEICE Transactions on Communications | Year: 2011

In future mobile networks, the ever-increasing loads imposed by mobile Internet traffic will force the network architecture to be changed from hierarchical to flat structure. Most of the existing mobility protocols are based on a centralized mobility anchor, which will process all control and data traffic. In the flat network architecture, however, the centralized mobility scheme has some limitations, such as unwanted traffic flowing into the core network, service degradation by a single point of failure, and increased operational costs, etc. This paper proposes mobility schemes for distributed mobility control in the flat network architecture. Based on the Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIP), which is a well-known mobility protocol, we propose the three mobility schemes: Signal-driven PMIP (S-PMIP), Data-driven Distributed PMIP (DD-PMIP), and Signal-driven Distributed PMIP (SD-PMIP). By numerical analysis, we show that the proposed distributed mobility schemes can give better performance than the existing centralized scheme in terms of the binding update and packet delivery costs, and that SD-PMIP provides the best performance among the proposed distributed schemes. © 2011 The Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers.


PubMed | Kyungpook National University, KNU, Teachers College and Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences
Type: | Journal: Scientific reports | Year: 2015

Gadolinium (Gd) is a unique and powerful element in chemistry and biomedicine which can be applied simultaneously to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), and neutron capture therapy for cancers. This multifunctionality can be maximized using gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles (GNPs) because of the large amount of Gd per GNP, making both diagnosis and therapy (i.e., theragnosis) for cancers possible using only GNPs. In this study, the T1 MRI and CT dual imaging capability of GNPs is explored by synthesizing various iodine compound (IC) coated GNPs (IC-GNPs). All the IC-GNP samples showed stronger X-ray absorption and larger longitudinal water proton relaxivities (r1 = 26-38s(-1) mM(-1) and r2/r1 = 1.4-1.9) than the respective commercial contrast agents. In vivo T1 MR and CT images of mice were also acquired, supporting that the GNP is a potential dual imaging agent.


Kim C.R.,Kyungpook National University | Baeck J.S.,KNU and Hospital | Chang Y.,KNU and Hospital | Bae J.E.,KNU | And 3 more authors.
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics | Year: 2014

The dependence of longitudinal (r1) and transverse (r 2) water proton relaxivities of ultrasmall gadolinium oxide (Gd 2O3) nanoparticles on the surface coating ligand-size was investigated. Both r1 and r2 values decreased with increasing ligand-size. We attributed this to the ligand-size effect. In addition the effectiveness of d-glucuronic acid-coated ultrasmall Gd 2O3 nanoparticles as T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents was confirmed by measuring the in vitro cytotoxicity and using in vivo T1 MR images in a mouse in a 1.5 T MR field. © the Partner Organisations 2014.


Kim H.J.,IBS | Jang H.J.,IBS | Jeon D.,IBS | Hwang J.-G.,KNU | Kim E.S.,KNU
IPAC 2013: Proceedings of the 4th International Particle Accelerator Conference | Year: 2013

Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) has been proposed as a multi-purpose accelerator facility for providing beams of exotic rare isotopes of various energies. The RISP driver linac which is used to accelerate the beam, for an example, Uranium ions from 0.5 MeV/u to 200 MeV/u consists of superconducting RF cavities and warm quadrupole magnets for focusing heavy ion beams. Requirement of the linac design is especially high for acceleration of multiple charge beams. In this paper, we present the requirements of dynamic errors and correction schemes to minimize the beam centroid oscillation and preserve beam losses under control. Copyright © 2013 by JACoW.


PubMed | KNU and Hospital, Teachers College, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Kyungpook National University and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Science and technology of advanced materials | Year: 2016

Water-soluble and biocompatible D-glucuronic acid coated Na

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