Reutlingen, Germany
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Kleindiek S.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Schock K.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Rummel A.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Zschornack M.,Global Foundries Inc. | And 3 more authors.
Microelectronics Reliability | Year: 2016

Using a compact nanoprobing setup comprising eight probe tips attached to piezo-driven micromanipulators, various techniques for fault isolation are performed on 28 nm samples inside an SEM. The employed techniques include nanoprobing as well as EBAC. The recently implemented Current Imaging technique is used to quickly image large arrays of contacts providing a means of locating faults. In this case, Current Imaging provides insight into the sample's behaviour yielding qualitatively comparable results to the more cumbersome cAFM technique. While the results of the TEM investigations including EDX mappings were inconclusive, the Current Imaging technique clearly shows that the root cause is located below the SiGe layer. By combining these techniques inside a FIB/SEM microscope, it is possible to locate and characterize a failure as well as prepare a TEM lamella for further investigation without the necessity to switch to a different tool. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd


Hassel A.W.,Max Planck Institute Für Eisenforschung | Hassel A.W.,Johannes Kepler University | Bello-Rodriguez B.,Max Planck Institute Für Eisenforschung | Smith A.J.,Max Planck Institute Für Eisenforschung | And 4 more authors.
Physica Status Solidi (B) Basic Research | Year: 2010

Directional solidification of eutectics is a route to produce iso-oriented metallic single crystalline nanowires (NWs). Etching or electrochemical oxidation allows selective dissolution of either of the phases to produce NW arrays, isolated NWs, nanopore arrays and also derived structures by combining various process steps. A good understanding of the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the phase transformation and chemical reactions including electrodissolution, passivation, selective etching, complexing of reaction products and electrodeposition in the systems NiAl-X (X=Re, W, Mo), Ag-Cu and Fe-Au was reached. Functional devices based on these NWs, like high aspect ratio NW based STM tips, nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), NW pH sensors and sensor arrays were constructed. Array of rhenium single crystalline NWs embedded in the NiAl matrix after partial dissolution of the matrix. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Hassel A.W.,Max Planck Institute Für Eisenforschung | Hassel A.W.,Johannes Kepler University | Milenkovic S.,Max Planck Institute Für Eisenforschung | Milenkovic S.,Johannes Kepler University | And 2 more authors.
Physica Status Solidi (A) Applications and Materials Science | Year: 2010

One gram of tungsten nanowires - equivalent to 5 billion single wires - was produced by electrochemically processing a directionally solidified eutectic NiAl-W alloy. Their release is realised by selective dissolution of the matrix with a yield beyond 98%. The nanowires are single crystals, homogeneous in diameter, and have extremely high aspect-ratios (>1000!). A multitude of potential applications are feasible - including sensing, probing, and high temperature nanotechnology. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Ring R.M.,Globalfoundries | Newkirk R.,Globalfoundries | Davidson K.,Globalfoundries | Capriola J.,Globalfoundries | And 3 more authors.
Conference Proceedings from the International Symposium for Testing and Failure Analysis | Year: 2015

The advances on IC technology have made defect localization extremely challenging. "Soft" failures (resistive vias and contacts) are typically difficult to localize using commonly available failure analysis (FA) techniques such as emission microscopy (EMMI) and scanning optical microscopy (SOM), and often cannot be observed by two-dimensional inspections using layer by layer removal. The article describes the Resistive Contrast Imaging (RCI) defect localization technique (also known as Electron Beam Absorbed Current (EBAC), instrumentations, and case studies on test structures or process control monitors especially designed to detect "soft" open failures on advanced (28nm and below) technology devices. It also lists the key SEM parameters critical for effective FA using the RCI nano-probing system. Copyright © 2015 ASM International® All rights reserved.


Arstila K.,IMEC | Hantschel T.,IMEC | Kleindiek S.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Sterr J.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | And 4 more authors.
Microelectronic Engineering | Year: 2010

In nanoprobing measurements the quality of the electrical contact strongly depends on the contact force. Probing semiconductors such as silicon requires applying very high and stable forces to establish an ohmic contact between the probe tip and the structure under study. Therefore, a compact force control system is needed for nanoprobing measurements inside a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) system. In this work we have developed an optical force measurement system (OFMS) for nanoprobing based on the reflection of a laser beam from a mirror of the probe towards a position-sensitive photodiode detector (PSD). The system principle is similar to the so-called optical-lever principle used in atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, geometrical restrictions of the SEM chamber and adjacent probes require the incident and reflected laser beams to be on the same plane as the probe cantilever. This is achieved by placing a small mirror element perpendicular onto the cantilever surface. The use of high-precision nanomanipulators with OFMS allows to position probe tips on a selected structure on a macroscopic-scale sample with nanometer precision. The slim design of the nanomanipulator and the OFMS system allows to place several force controlled tips on the same nanostructure. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Home > Press > The University of Bristol uses Kleindiek micromanipulators and the application of SEMGlu in their research on materials from the Japanese nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima Abstract: EM Resolutions, manufacturers and suppliers of tools and accessories for users of electron microscopes, report on the research of Peter Martin from the University of Bristol. He is applying Kleindiek micromanipulators in the characterisation of materials resulting from the accident at the Japanese nuclear power station. PhD student, Peter Martin, is a member of the School of Physics at the University of Bristol. His research focuses on the March 2011 incident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) in Japan and its effects at both the metre and micron scales. He has used an unmanned aerial vehicle to investigate the evolving distribution of contamination as well as using novel micro-analysis techniques to isolate and subsequently study tiny fragments of fallout material collected from around the crippled plant. This has potential impact on human health and the background to this is well documented from short-lived radioisotopes to longer life elements. When he and his colleagues started the project and looked at the current state of the work surrounding the study of material ejected from the FDNPP, it became apparent the lack of work that was being conducted on individual particles of fallout material. Only a few studies were being performed on material collected from air sampling filters at a few locations close as well as further away from the plant. Previous work within the Interface Analysis Centre at the University of Bristol has extensively used Kleindiek MM3A-EM Micromanipulators (EM Resolutions, Cambridge, UK) for a range of applications (TEM sample preparation, in-situ force measurements and electrical probe-based characterisation). They saw the potential to apply the microscopy knowledge and experience within the Centre's new environmental- SEM - enabling much more efficient sample preparation and higher throughput of material. By using micromanipulators in their work, they are able to remove only the particles of interest (after identifying material under the SEM). In this way, they are able to obtain the most accurate isotopic analysis results (free from background interference) in addition to having the samples mounted for an array of further analytical techniques. Micromanipulators such as the Kleindiek MM3A-EM installed within an SEM represent the only method to remove the sub-nanometer fallout particles encountered. When asked about his choice of manipulator, Martin said “Kleindiek MM3A Micromanipulators are used in our work for other applications as well as the “particle picking” described above. The main advantage of Kleindiek system is their flexibility in operation. Unlike other systems which provide a method of manipulating a needle, the Kleindiek platform can be used for a whole range of applications and is not limited as a niche instrument. We see it is important for us in academia to combine these advantages in a wide range of applications with the potential to also expand further on it.” Continuing, Martin talks about the experimental methods used. “Using electrostatic attraction between objects and manipulation needles is the common way with which to “pick-up” material. However, in order to ensure that these highly active particles remain attached and do not “fall off” representing a large radiological hazard, the use of Kleindiek SEMGlu has been very important. The very high strength of this vacuum compatible adhesive, which is polymerised under the electron beam, means that the particles are well-adhered for transport and remain on the needle tip during the range of analytical techniques that are carried out on them whilst still attached to the manipulation needle (tungsten or glass). Like the Kleindiek systems in general, other uses for SEMGlu outside of "particle picking” have been explored within the group.” The work described here is published in detail in an open-access paper in Spectrochimica Acta Part B: Atomic Spectroscopy: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sab.2015.12.010 . For more details about Kleindiek Nanotechnik and their micromanipulators available exclusively from EM Resolutions for the UK & Ireland markets, please visit http://emresolutions.com/sem-products/kleindiek-micromanipulators-and-nanotools/ . About EM Resolutions Limited EM Resolutions was founded in 2012 to manufacture high quality TEM support films for laboratory consumables companies in the UK. Having grown to become a Limited Company and with an increasing range of products, they are now a significant supplier of consumables and accessories for Electron Microscopy. They distribute worldwide directly to end users as well as through a growing network of distributors. The EMR team combine many years’ experience in the microscopy industry with listening to customer needs and supplying the best quality products with a prompt and professional service. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


Kleindiek S.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Schock K.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Rummel A.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Zschomack M.,Globalfoundries | And 3 more authors.
Proceedings of the International Symposium on the Physical and Failure Analysis of Integrated Circuits, IPFA | Year: 2016

Using a compact nanoprobing setup comprising eight probe tips attached to piezo-driven micromanipulators, various techniques for fault isolation are performed on 28 nm samples inside an SEM. The recently implemented Current Imaging technique is used to quickly image large arrays of contacts providing a means of locating faults. © 2016 IEEE.


Rummel A.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Schock K.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Kemmler M.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Smith A.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Kleindiek S.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH
Microelectronics Reliability | Year: 2013

We have investigated a new method to repair a broken bonding wire on a semiconductor device inside a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). This approach makes use of a microsoldering unit that is mounted on a micromanipulator and can be heated up to 200 C and a small heating stage on which a sample is mounted. A microgripper is used to bring the broken bonding wire to its original place and a special solder is used to make a low ohmic connection between the broken contacts. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Rummel A.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Schock K.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Smith A.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH | Kleindiek S.,Kleindiek Nanotechnik GmbH
Microelectronics Reliability | Year: 2012

We have investigated two new methods to establish an electrically conductive interconnection between two contacts on a semiconductor device inside a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Both methods use a nanowire that is transported to the contacts. The first interconnection is made using a glue that can be hardened inside the SEM to fix the nanowires at the contacts. The other approach makes use of a microsoldering unit that is mounted on a micromanipulator and can be heated up to 200 °C. A special solder is used to make a low ohmic connection between the contacts. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Home > Press > Imperial College use Kleindiek micromanipulators in their research into electrochemical energy devices Abstract: EM Resolutions, manufacturers and suppliers of tools and accessories for users of electron microscopes, report on the research of Dr Farid Tariq of Imperial College. He is applying Kleindiek micromanipulators in the characterisation of electrochemical energy devices. Dr Farid Tariq is a Research Associate at Imperial College where he is part of a research team led by Professor Nigel Brandon in the Department of Earth Science & Engineering focussing on improving fuel cells and batteries. Dr Tariq leads the effort to study 3D multiscale imaging and modelling of these devices. The group is focused on these electrochemical energy devices which range in use from consumer electronics, to cars up to grid level energy storage applications. They apply 3D imaging and advanced quantification of these structures at fine length scales approaching tens of nanometers. The goal is to develop an ability to control and understand how porous electrodes in these devices operate at these fine levels and how this ultimately scales up to observed performance when in use. Dr Tariq selected micromanipulators from Kleindiek Nanotechnik (EM Resolutions, UK) to help to enable the understanding of microstructure and property relationships together, all at a fine scale. This is combined with 3D imaging to understand the structure in greater depth. In this respect, rather than just observing different features, he is able to measure and characterise their influence within the microstructure. In doing so, the aim is to mitigate or reduce sources of failure or degradation. The end result is to ultimately make batteries or fuel cells with longer lifetimes and better performance. Describing his reasons for selecting Kleindiek, Dr Tariq said “We have been aware of some small alternative companies for manipulators and others that produce in-situ stages. Some of these were too large for the applications we were considering and not tailored to our type of work. The alternative was to perform our nano-indentation experiments and correlate those with FIB-SEM imaging. My vision is to integrate different instruments and capabilities that we have developed. I wanted high flexibility of use and deployment. This was one of the benefits I saw from Kleindiek's micromanipulators. In addition, the work we do with them can be integrated with IQM Elements imaging analysis and quantification software.” For more details about Kleindiek Nanotechnik and their micromanipulators available exclusively from EM Resolutions for the UK & Ireland markets, please visit emresolutions.com/sem-products/kleindiek-micromanipulators-and-nanotools/. About EM Resolutions EM Resolutions was founded in 2012 to manufacture high quality TEM support films for laboratory consumables companies in the UK. Having grown to become a Limited Company and with an increasing range of products, they are now a significant supplier of consumables and accessories for Electron Microscopy. They distribute worldwide directly to end users as well as through a growing network of distributors. The EMR team combine many years' experience in the microscopy industry with listening to customer needs and supplying the best quality products with a prompt and professional service. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

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