Pisa, Italy
Pisa, Italy

Kiwi are flightless birds endemic to New Zealand, in the genus Apteryx and family Apterygidae. At around the size of a domestic chicken, kiwi are by far the smallest living ratites and lay the largest egg in relation to their body size of any species of bird in the world. There are five recognised species, two of which are currently vulnerable, one of which is endangered, and one of which is critically endangered. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: LCE-07-2014 | Award Amount: 19.12M | Year: 2015

Four major Distribution System Operators (in Italy, France, Spain and Sweden) with smart metering infrastructure in place, associated with electricity retailers, aggregators, software providers, research organizations and one large consumer, propose five large-scale demonstrations to show that the deployment of novel services in the electricity retail markets (ranging from advanced monitoring to local energy control, and flexibility services) can be accelerated thanks to an open European Market Place for standardized interactions among all the electricity stakeholders, opening up the energy market also to new players at EU level. The proposed virtual environment will empower real customers with higher quality and quantity of information on their energy consumptions (and generation in case of prosumers), addressing more efficient energy behaviours and usage as through advanced energy monitoring and control services. Accessibility of metering data, close to real time, made available by DSOs in a standardized and non-discriminatory way to all the players of electricity retail markets (e.g. electricity retailers, aggregators, ESCOs and end consumers), will facilitate the emergence of new markets for energy services, enhancing competitiveness and encouraging the entry of new players, benefitting the customers. Economic models of these new services will be proposed and assessed. Based on the five demonstrations, while connecting with parallel projects funded at EU or national levels on novel services provision, the dissemination activities will support the preparation of the Market Place exploitation strategies, as well as the promotion of the use cases tested during the demonstration activities.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: EeB-07-2015 | Award Amount: 7.29M | Year: 2015

MOEEBIUS introduces a Holistic Energy Performance Optimization Framework that enhances current (passive and active building elements) modelling approaches and delivers innovative simulation tools which (i) deeply grasp and describe real-life building operation complexities in accurate simulation predictions that significantly reduce the performance gap and, (ii) enhance multi-fold, continuous optimization of building energy performance as a means to further mitigate and reduce the identified performance gap in real-time or through retrofitting. The MOEEBIUS Framework comprises the configuration and integration of an innovative suite of end-user tools and applications enabling (i) Improved Building Energy Performance Assessment on the basis of enhanced BEPS models that allow for more accurate representation of the real-life complexities of the building, (ii) Precise allocation of detailed performance contributions of critical building components, for directly assessing actual performance against predicted values and easily identifying performance deviations and further optimization needs, (iii) Real-time building performance optimization (during the operation and maintenance phase) including advanced simulation-based control and real-time self-diagnosis features, (iv) Optimized retrofitting decision making on the basis of improved and accurate LCA/ LCC-based performance predictions, and (v) Real-time peak-load management optimization at the district level. Through the provision of a robust technological framework MOEEBIUS will enable the creation of attractive business opportunities for the MOEEBIUS end-users (ESCOs, Aggregators, Maintenance Companies and Facility Managers) in evolving and highly competitive energy services markets. The MOEEBIUS framework will be validated in 3 large-scale pilot sites, located in Portugal, UK and Serbia, incorporating diverse building typologies, heterogeneous energy systems and spanning diverse climatic conditions.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: SCC-01-2015 | Award Amount: 28.05M | Year: 2016

Sharing Cities has four key objectives. 1) To achieve scale in the European smart cities market by proving that properly designed smart city solutions, based around common needs, can be integrated in complex urban environments. This will be done in a way that exhibits their true potential and allows for the significant scale-up and consequent increase in social, economic and environmental value. 2) Adopt a digital first approach which proves the extent to which ICT integration can improve and connect up existing infrastructure, as well as the design and running of new city infrastructure. This will also allow for the creation of a new set of next stage digital services which will help citizens make better and beneficial choices around energy efficiency and mobility, which when scaled up will enhance the citys ability to hit key targets for mobility, housing, energy efficiency and resilience, and economic development. 3) Accelerate the market to understand, develop and trial business, investment and governance models, essential for the true aggregation and replication (through collaboration) of smart city solutions in cities of different sizes and maturities. In doing this, we intend to accelerate the pace by which we make transformative improvements, and enhance sustainability in communities. 4) Share and collaborate for society: to respond to increasing demand for participation; to enhance mechanisms for citizens engagement; to improve local governments capacity for policy making and service delivery through collaboration and co-design; resulting in outcomes that are better for citizens, businesses and visitors. These will be delivered by a range of expert partners across 8 work packages.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 781.26K | Year: 2015

This project will deliver a novel low cost intelligent building energy control system integrated with a peer-to-peer energy market that will enable small to medium enterprises to control and automate energy production and consumption while participating in a localised energy market. This project will also facilitate new sectors of the economy to participate in demand response and time of use electricity pricing programmes. The project aims to create a pilot programme for 1 year where successful operation will optimise energy system efficiency and ensure that clients are paid for what they generate, only pay for what they use, reduce energy bills and are offered a new way to earn money by taking an active part in managing supply and demand.


Patent
Kiwi | Date: 2013-07-10

A short game bag for cooperating with a mother bag is disclosed. The short game bag may have a tubular body enclosed at a bottom end and open at a top end; the tubular body having a outer side and an attachment side, wherein the outer side comprises a handle and an extendable set of at least two legs attached by a hinge proximal to the top end. Further, the attachment side has a fastening mechanism for attachment to a mother bag along a substantially longitudinal axis of the mother bag, wherein the short game bag can attach in a substantially parallel manner to the mother bag.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Feasibility Study | Award Amount: 24.75K | Year: 2012

A project to leverage existing open source hardware, software and protocols to develop an ultra-low cost metering, control and communications unit to enable end user inclusion in a peer-to-peer (P2P) micro grid, to allow consumers to control and automate energy production and consumption at the domestic and residential level. This unit will also facilitate clients taking part in residential demand response programmes. The project aims to create a prototype unit and develop the designs and plans for a mass manufacture version. Succesful operation will reduce energy bills and offer a new way to earn money by taking an active part in managing supply and demand. Micro grids, smart grids at the neighbourhood level, offer benefits to both the energy user and the environment through localisation of energy, reduction in transmission and distribution losses, savings in infrastructure investment and community based demand response.


Patent
Kiwi | Date: 2013-12-20

A scorekeeper may detect swing candidate and obtains a confirmation from a golfer that the swing candidate contributes to a golf score, provided that a sufficient gap in time or distance occurs after the last swing candidate is received. Next, the scorekeeper may receive a first feedback from the golfer indicating at least one stroke, and in response, update a score to reflect at the least one stroke, and storing the first location. The scorekeeper may repeat these steps to obtain at least a second swing candidate that is verified by the golfer as contributing to the score. In response to these verified swing candidates, the scorekeeper updates the score to reflect at the least one stroke, and store the second location.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Feasibility Study | Award Amount: 66.00K | Year: 2012

The objective is to demonstrate how demand side resources can participate in a capacity market in the UK. Specifically, we will simulate a capacity market mechanism in which demand resources are aggregated and dispatched in response to tightening capacity markets. This product would have operational parameters which are typical features of capacity markets, including a 24 hour “standby” notification, and a 2 hour ahead “go”. The assessment of avoided transmission and distribution losses will be based on a pilot Willingness to Accept study which will measure both the price per MW/h at which customers and aggregators will be willing to participate in a capacity market and the market conditions for them to join in.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: SME-1 | Phase: SIE-01-2014-1 | Award Amount: 71.43K | Year: 2015

CHALLENGE: Demand response (DR) is central to the successful evolution of a new low carbon electricity system in order to deliver grid flexibility & stability, however it is progressing slowly in the EU due to technological barriers which prevent widespread uptake: high in cost hardware (4.000 - 6.000); not specifically designed for DR lack critical functionality (e.g. wireless communication, integration of renewables); & not sufficiently open for wider industry participation. PROPOSED SOLUTION: To address the need for innovations that overcome principal barriers to DR, this project seeks to advance KPLs Energy Management Platform, KEMP, from a prototype demonstrated in a relevant environment (TRL6) to complete & qualified commercial prototype (TRL8). KEMP is a low cost, automated ancillary services platform which consists of: [1] Unique hardware: multi-asset control; first platform to integrate renewable assets; wireless communication between assets reduced installation cost; & sec. by sec. meter readings requirement for Frequency Response programmes. [2] Innovative software: cloud based for greater scalability; flexibility & remote monitoring, forecasting model - for integration of renewables; & optimisation engine - to max. revenues. END USERS: [1] Initial target = large scale commercial & industrial (C&I) orgs with high MW capacity (>1MW) e.g. financial, telecoms, hospitals, hotels etc. Asset types: DRUPS systems & HVAC. [2] Secondary target = SMEs with low MW capacity (50kW< capacity < 1MW) incl. Water Pump Stations, Small Data Centres, Retail Stores. Asset types: Variable Speed Motors, HVAC, UPS systems etc. STUDY OBJECTIVES: tech validation, market analysis, economic & business assessment, operational capacity analysis. Activities will be delivered within a 4 month period, & result in a comprehensive feasibility report detailing the next steps towards development & commercialisation, forming the basis of the SMEI Phase II Business Plan.


News Article | October 3, 2013
Site: www.linkiesta.it

Nomen omen, direbbero i più colti. Nel nome di Kiwi, in effetti, c’è tutto il senso di una startup nata nel 2011 dall’idea del 19enne Niccolò Ferragamo e che oggi dà già lavoro a 15 persone. Tutte tra 22 e 29 anni, nell’Italia della disoccupazione giovanile che ha superato il 40 per cento. Mentre il mondo impazza per i cinguettii di Twitter, «noi abbiamo scelto come nome e simbolo della nostra app il kiwi, uccellino piccolo, un po’ goffo e schivo che passa tutta la sua vita a cercare di volare», racconta Giulia Cian Seren, che nel team si occupa del marketing. «Questa è la nostra filosofia: siamo partiti come 19enni, ma non rinunciamo a volare». Prendete la storia di Facebook e ambientatela in Italia. Perché quello che questi ragazzi hanno combinato nel giro di pochi anni somiglia tanto alle avventure di Zuckerberg e colleghi. Tutto nasce in una università. Non Harvard, ma la scuola Sant’Anna di Pisa, dove Niccolò studiava Economia (e dove si è laureato con sei mesi di anticipo!). Nel collegio universitario della città toscana, con Niccolò abitano tre “cervelloni” dell’informatica, che scrivono i primi codici e algoritmi di Kiwi. L’idea c’è. Bisogna cercare i soldi. «Nel primo giro di investimenti abbiamo raccolto 80mila euro», racconta Giulia. Grazie al passaparola ma anche grazie ai ragazzi che si rivolgono a imprenditori e professori universitari. Con il business plan di Kiwi in una mano e la prima demo dell’app nell’altra. L’idea è semplice e sembra convincente: far interagire persone che si trovano in uno stesso luogo (ci sono varie fasce di distanza) o partecipano allo stesso evento, grazie all’applicazione per smartphone “Kiwi Local”. Giulia lo spiega meglio: «Kiwi è un social proximity networking che lavora sulla geolocalizzazione. C’è sia un aspetto ludico, magari si può chiedere alla persona che è in quel momento vicina se le va di andare a prendere una birra, ma ci si possono anche scambiare informazioni importanti. Tipo: “Hai un antidolorifico?”». Dall’ambiente globale di Twitter e Facebook al mondo locale (e reale) dell’uccellino Kiwi. Basta scaricare l’app (gratuita) sullo smartphone. E dopo il login è possibile vedere all’istante chi, della propria “rete” è vicino ed entrare in contatto con lui o lei attraverso chat o email. Gli utenti registrati, già 10mila sparsi soprattutto nelle grandi città italiane, possono pubblicare foto e commenti, che vengono visti solo da chi fa parte della stessa rete. «È come incontrare un ex compagno di corso dell’Università durante un viaggio di lavoro che porta entrambi a Londra. O fare network con un membro della stessa associazione durante uno spettacolo a teatro. Kiwi permette di scoprire profili interessanti a due passi da noi ma che, per mancanza di informazioni o di una occasione per comunicare, non avremmo mai conosciuto». Gli investitori iniziali erano 19. Tutte piccole quote, usate per finanziare l’attività di ricerca e sviluppo e le infrastrutture. Dopo due anni, il capitale totale raccolto ha raggiunto quota 350mila euro. L’ultimo round ha fruttato ben 200mila euro di finanziamenti. I nomi degli investitori sono top secret. Anche se, assicurano, «non ci sono grandi nomi. Quando Google verrà da noi ve lo faremo sapere». Il team che porta avanti la startup è composto da 15 persone, nove sviluppatori e sei amministratori. Il cosiddetto “management”, anche se loro stessi ridono all’idea di usare questa parola per autodefinirsi. «Mi viene difficile dire “il mio capo“ quando parlo di Niccolò», scherza Giulia. Hanno tra i 22 e i 29 anni (il più “vecchio” è il capo del settore tecnico). «In cinque non raggiungiamo 150 anni». Ma come si fanno i soldi con tutto questo? Oltre all’app, la società offre anche servizi di geolocalizzazione e software per le aziende. «Tu e i tuoi colleghi potete scrivervi e vedere se siete vicini o nella stessa città. Puoi decidere se prendere un caffè con loro o evitarli», spiega Giulia. «Kiwi rende digitali le relazioni umane». Che non significa «rendere digitale la vita o perdere l’aspetto umano a favore di quello virtuale. Al contrario, vedendo la persona vicina che ha Kiwi, si può passare dal digitale al vis-a-vis. E chiedendo informazioni alle persone vicine che non conosci, puoi anche facilitarti la giornata, magari facendoti consigliare un buon ristorante». Poi ci sono i software da vendere alle attività commerciali per vedere i messaggi che si pubblicano in quel momento in quel posto su uno schermo, ma anche la pubblicità (locale ma non solo) e le app personalizzate per associazioni o organizzazioni. «Può essere un gruppo religioso o un’associazione culturale, che in questo modo si dota di un social interno. Così viene garantita maggiore privacy rispetto a Facebook». La maggior parte dei componenti del team di Kiwi frequenta ancora le aule universitarie, tra master e specializzazioni. Ma alcuni di loro hanno già esperienze in altre aziende. Niccolò viene da JP Morgan, Mario (Parteli) ha lavorato per Deloitte, Andrea (Castiglione) ha creato Butlr. Mentre alcuni degli sviluppatori hanno già lavorato per Google. «Siamo andati dagli investitori portandoci dietro anche queste esperienze e queste referenze», raccontano. Perché questa non è mica la Silicon Valley. E «in Italia difficilmente prendono sul serio un 25enne che si presenta a chiedere soldi per la sua azienda», racconta Giulia. «Noi ci siamo riusciti perché siamo convinti della nostra idea. Non lo abbiamo fatto perché ci annoiavamo, ma perché volevamo fare qualcosa di nostro. Insomma, non è vero che in Italia va tutto male. Ma è più facile fare qualcosa di tuo anziché avere lo stesso ruolo o la stessa posizione in un’azienda». Certo, «alcuni ci hanno risposto “a 22 anni cosa vuoi fare?”. Ma non voglio parlare delle cose negative! La cosa importante sono stati quelli che hanno creduto in noi, magari rivedendo loro stessi a vent’anni». La sede legale dell’azienda è a Pisa, ma i ragazzi di Kiwi sono cittadini del mondo. Nella città della torre pendente ci sono quelli che si occupano della programmazione. Poi c’è chi vive tra Londra, chi a Milano, chi a Malta, chi a Torino, chi a Roma. E anche l’organizzazione del lavoro è innovativa. Certo «si lavora molto, ma in maniera assolutamente flessibile. Non timbriamo il cartellino. Ci sono giorni in cui, io che vivo a Malta scelgo di fare windsurf e poi lavorare tre ore, altri in cui lavoro 15 ore. Spesso si lavora anche la domenica. Il che significa anche rinunciare a una festa o a un’uscita con i nostri coetanei». Così «riusciamo ad avere uno stipendio. C’è una parte fissa e una parte variabile. Certo non guadagniamo 5mila euro al mese, mangiando ostriche e champagne, ma a 22 anni riesco a mantenermi con quello che guadagno», racconta Giulia. E in questi pochi anni i ragazzi di Kiwi hanno anche licenziato. «Si discute e possono esserci anche delle incompatibilità, fare startup non è una cosa adatta a tutti». E gli investitori, «che conoscono meglio di noi come funziona il mercato, ci fanno da guida consigliandoci cosa è meglio fare, visto che quello che stiamo facendo noi molti di loro lo hanno già fatto in passato». Ma la storia non finisce qui. Kiwi è alla ricerca di nuovo personale e il prossimo obiettivo è un nuovo round di investimenti da 1 milione di euro per lanciare sul mercato la piattaforma business to business per aziende e fornitori. «Cerchiamo sempre nuove persone da assumere, persone in gamba che si riconoscono nei nostri valori, sia nel lato tecnico sia nel lato amministrativo. Non guardiamo il voto di laurea, ma l’attitudine. Scegliamo chi ha davvero voglia, non chi cerca un lavoro qualsiasi pur di lavorare». Le candidature sono aperte. «Non è vero che in Italia va tutto male».

Loading Kiwi collaborators
Loading Kiwi collaborators