London, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom

Kingston University is a public research university located in Kingston upon Thames, southwest London, United Kingdom. It was originally founded in 1899 and became a university in 1992.Campuses are located in Kingston and Roehampton. There is a wide range of undergraduate and postgraduate work spread across five faculties, as well as some further education provisions. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 312.28K | Year: 2015

This project assesses the architectural legacy of The Troubles, the social-historical phenomenon between 1969 and 1994 when the sectarian conflict in Northern Ireland was at its most extreme. The influence of The Troubles was such that it has had a profound impact on the social, political, economic, cultural and spatial structures of Northern Ireland. There are many visible architectural remnants of the Troubles in contemporary Belfast, most notably the peace-walls between a number of Protestant and Roman Catholic residential communities. Quite distinct from this recognised architectural legacy, this research encapsulates a specific, discrete and barely recognised aspect of the cultural structures of The Troubles: a range of distinct and divisive architecture within individual communities in Belfast, now embedded in the contemporary urban fabric. As Northern Ireland moves forward in a post-Troubles era, a plethora of housing, roads, landscaping and related artefacts continue to divide and spatially fragment communities. The research conceives of a community as a construct of People and Architecture, an intrinsic inter-relationship between people and their built environment. Community, housing, and security in Belfast are intricately linked. During The Troubles 70% of bombings were aimed at housing in the Belfast Urban Area. The residential inner-city was subject to fundamental architectural alterations by both civilian and security authorities. These interventions resulted in a profound material impact upon inner-city communities, creating architectural and spatial disconnection that has promoted deprivation and disenfranchisement within these communities. These areas that are at now at the focus of the Together: Building a United Community Strategy, the core policy framework for post-conflict Northern Ireland, which emphasises the role communities will have to play in shaping their own future. Whilst there has been much work in the areas of planning policy, sociology and human geography concerning The Troubles, there is a distinct lack of architectural research in this area, particularly concerning architectural design and the relationship to communities during conflict. This study addresses this gap in knowledge, and equip local communities and policy makers with a crucial knowledge-base that is pertinent to contemporary policy formulation. The overarching aim of this research is to effect material change in the community life of some of Belfasts most deprived urban areas. The research conceives of a city-wide study that will examine the architectural legacy of The Troubles and engage local communities with these findings in order to inclusively inform related policy formulation. This suggests four questions: What do these architectural artefacts look like? What do communities have to say about this architecture? How can this research inform the related and relevant policy discussions? What are the lessons for other communities, at both national and international level? These questions formulate the following objectives: to engage this area of arts & humanities research with community and policy stakeholders; to foster community empowerment through structured, active inclusion with policy makers; to illuminate and illustrate the urban impact of conflict in Belfasts communities; and, to develop a transferable method to engage local communities as active-researchers of their built environment. A community as a construct of People and Architecture involves a complex inter-relationship between community, design practice and policy ambition. A cross-disciplinary research team addresses this research context. Academics from architecture, photography, social policy, planning policy and conflict studies are working with community project partners and government agencies. This team have developed a co-designed, collaborative methodology with embedded pathways to community, policy, public and academic impact.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: IoT-01-2016 | Award Amount: 17.60M | Year: 2017

The SoundCity Project MONICA aims to provide a very large scale demonstration of multiple existing and new Internet of Things technologies for Smarter Living. The solution will be deployed in 6 major cities in Europe. MONICA demonstrates a large scale IoT ecosystem that uses innovative wearable and portable IoT sensors and actuators with closed-loop back-end services integrated into an interoperable, cloud-based platform capable of offering a multitude of simultaneous, targeted applications. All ecosystems will be demonstrated in the scope of large scale city events, but have general applicability for dynamically deploying Smart City applications in many fixed locations such as airports, main traffic arterials, and construction sites. Moreover, it is inherent in the MONICA approach to identify the official standardisation potential areas in all stages of the project. MONICA will demonstrate an IoT platform in massive scale operating conditions; capable of handling at least 10.000 simultaneous real end-users with wearable and portable sensors using existing and emerging technologies (TRL 5-6) and based upon open standards and architectures. It will design, develop and deploy a platform capable of integrating large amounts of heterogeneous, interoperable IoT enabled sensors with different data capabilities (video, audio, data), resource constraints (wearables, Smartphones, Smartwatches), bandwidth (UWB, M2M), costs (professional, consumer), and deployment (wearable, mobile, fixed, airborne) as well as actuators (lights, LED, cameras, alarms, drones, loudspeakers). It will demo end-to-end, closed loop solutions covering everything from devices and middleware with semantic annotations through a multitude of wireless communication channels to cloud based applications and back to actuation networks. Humans-in-the-Loop is demonstrated through integrating Situational Awareness and Decision Support tools for organisers, security staff and sound engineers situation rooms.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-31-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2016

Considerable challenges remain today regarding Europes transition towards a decarbonised energy system that meets the economic and social needs of its citizens. Rebound effects, that is, a full or partial cancelling-out of efficiency gains over time through increased overall energy use, highlight the centrality of consumption in multi-scalar decarbonisation efforts, urgently requiring attention from scientists and policy makers. Calls also abound for innovative, research-led programmes to enhance the social acceptability of energy transition initiatives and technologies. Understanding how culture-specific views and practices and energy policy and governance both shape and reflect individual and collective energy choices is of paramount importance for the success of the Energy Union. ENERGISE responds directly to these challenges by engaging in frontier energy consumption scholarship. Recognising the persistence of diverse energy cultures, both within and between countries, ENERGISE offers an ambitious social science programme to enhance understanding of changes in energy consumption practices across 30 European countries. Moving beyond state-of-the-art research, ENERGISE theoretically frames and empirically investigates socio-economic, cultural, political and gender aspects of the energy transition. It also examines how routines and ruptures (re)shape household energy consumption practices. Adopting a cutting-edge Living Labs approach, designed specifically to facilitate cross-cultural comparisons, ENERGISE fuses tools for changing individual- and community-level energy consumption with a novel method for energy sustainability assessment. ENERGISE will open new research horizons and greatly enhance Europes capacity for high-impact, gender-sensitive consumption research. It also offers timely support for public- and private-sector decision-makers who grapple with the design and implementation of measures to effectively reduce household energy consumption.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-15-2014 | Award Amount: 6.08M | Year: 2015

The data generated in the health domain is coming from heterogeneous, multi-modal, multi-lingual, dynamic and fast evolving medical technologies. Today we are found in a big health landscape characterized by large volume, versatility and velocity (3Vs) which has led to the evolution of the informatics in the big biodata domain. AEGLE project will build an innovative ICT solution addressing the whole data value chain for health based on: cloud computing enabling dynamic resource allocation, HPC infrastructures for computational acceleration and advanced visualization techniques. AEGLE will: - Realize a multiparametric platform using algorithms for analysing big biodata including features such as volume properties, communication metrics and bottlenecks, estimation of related computational resources needed, handling data versatility and managing velocity - Address the systemic health big bio-data in terms of the 3V multidimensional space, using analytics based on PCA techniques - Demonstrate AEGLEs efficiency through the provision of aggregated services covering the 3V space of big bio-data. Specifically it will be evaluated in: a)big biostreams where the decision speed is critical and needs non-linear and multi-parametric estimators for clinical decision support within limited time, b)big-data from non-malignant diseases where the need for NGS and molecular data analytics requires the combination of cloud located resources, coupled with local demands for data and visualization, and finally c)big-data from chronic diseases including EHRs and medication, with needs for quantified estimates of important clinical parameters, semantics extraction and regulatory issues for integrated care - Bring together all related stakeholders, leading to integration with existing open databases, increasing the speed of AEGLE adaptation - Build a business ecosystem for the wider exploitation and targeting on cross-border production of custom multi-lingual solutions based on AEGLE.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 2.88M | Year: 2015

The realization of the paradigm of Internet anywhere, anytime and any-device and the diffusion of end-user multimedia devices with powerful and user-friendly capabilities such as smartphones, tablets PCs, mobile gaming terminals and e-books, are leading to the proliferation of a significant amount of emerging multimedia services: immersive environments, mobile online gaming, 3D virtual world, book/newspaper consumption, social networking, IPTV applications, just to cite a few. Some of these services have already reached a major market success, such as the case of newspaper/magazine mobile readers and smartphone multimedia apps. Their success has been achieved especially because a user-centered approach has been followed to design the whole process of content production, service activation, content consumption, service management and updating. From these considerations it arises that management of the Quality of Experience (QoE) is undoubtedly a crucial concept in the deployment of future successful services and it is straightforward to be understood but complex to be implemented in real systems, since there are many variables which will affect QoE, and these variables are changeable and span multidisciplinary areas including multimedia signal processing, communications, computer networking, psychology and sociology. This Network focuses on the analysis, design, optimization and management of the QoE in advanced multimedia services, creating a fully-integrated and multi-disciplinary network of 12 ESRs working in and seconded by 7 academic institutions, 3 private companies and 1 standardization institute distributed in 6 European countries and in Korea. This Network will offer to a group of newly recruited Fellows in a cross-sectoral environment to shape their long-term research view and get fundamental methodological tools on various research fields, namely: multimedia networking, signal processing, communications, business, psychology and sociology.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-COG | Phase: ERC-CoG-2015 | Award Amount: 1.60M | Year: 2016

The humanitarian fight against trafficking in the sex industry legitimizes the enforcement of increasingly restrictive migration laws and controls, which often exacerbate sex workers vulnerability to being trafficked. SEXHUM adopts an art-science interdisciplinary approach bringing together visual anthropology, sociology, gender and queer studies and human geography to study the relationship between migration, sex work, exploitation and trafficking. It contextualizes this relationship within the global onset of sexual humanitarianism, a concept coined by the PI. It refers to the ways migrants are increasingly represented, understood and targeted by the media, policymakers and social interventions as vulnerable to exploitation and abuse in relation to their sexual orientation or behaviour. SEXHUM adopts a migration studies perspective and a participative approach to focus on migrant sex workers addressed by sexual humanitarianism as victims of trafficking. It reappraises the concepts of exploitation, slavery and trafficking through the lens of how they are understood and experienced by migrants. The project analyses the global emergence of humanitarian migration governance by examining the impact of sexual humanitarianism across six strategic urban settings in Europe (France Marseille and Paris), the US (New York and Los Angeles), Australia (Sydney) and New Zealand (Auckland) that are characterized by different policies on migration, sex work (criminalisation, regulation, de-criminalisation) and trafficking. The innovative method developed by the PI combines ethnographic observations, semi-structured interviewing and participative filmmaking to address the narrated as well as the affective, relational and performative dimensions of migrants experiences of agency and exploitation. The research will generate needed user-based data on the impact of anti-trafficking initiatives that will be highly relevant to policymaking.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 227.49K | Year: 2016

To develop and embed remote door intercom, CCTV and access control technologies enabling users to securely interact with their entry door, through their personal devices from anywhere in the world.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 226.72K | Year: 2016

The purpose of this research is to develop a new methodology for understanding the extent, nature and impact of universities knowledge exchange partnerships within England and Wales Creative Economy. This will build on the work of earlier University Alliance research, such as Creating Innovative Regions (2016), identifying the crucial leadership and connecting roles universities play via: longstanding graduate networks; close relations with local businesses and public sector bodies; their alignment to regional strengths; the extent to which they act as hubs for KE activity; and their contribution to the Creative Economy ecosystem. It will also build on the analysis of the AHRCs Knowledge Exchange hubs and Brighton Fuse. The pilot takes Alliance universities as a test case for developing the new methodology to tell the hidden story of partnership activities, with broadened access allowing us to combine robust data mapping techniques with qualitative analyses to reveal underlying factors and insights. The study takes place within an institutional context, and therefore needs to take into account existing frameworks, priorities, investment strategies, governance, organisational structures, external engagement, labour divisions, reward systems, resources, expertise, and cultural doctrines. Situating KE operations within the wider ecosystem - in a similar manner to the innovation studies around regional economic development attempted by many geographers - will also allow us to address not just outcomes, but include the power relations and decision-making processes missed by other studies. In doing this, the project will undertake a gap analysis identifying the limits of existing data sets, and will seek to make recommendations for institutions and policy makers accordingly that will address existing systems and practices. Although the focus will be local, exploring the role of universities as anchors in their regions, the mapping exercise will also examine existing Alliance KE partnership activities with international development potential.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 133.87K | Year: 2016

To develop a novel, marketable solution capable of guaranteeing seamless, dynamic and reliable wireless communication over multiple communications bearers.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Fellowship | Award Amount: 199.81K | Year: 2016

Domestic electric products only became widespread in Ireland after World War II as a result of the rural electrification project carried out by the Electricity Supply Board (ESB). These products were seen as symbols of modernity and liberation in other countries, but rising standards actually created more work for the housewife, with ideas of female self-worth becoming tied up in domestic labour. This project will use oral history, archival research and object analysis to investigate the meanings of these imported electrical products in rural Ireland in the 1950s and 1960s, particularly in relation to dominant Catholic attitudes to women and domestic work, emphasising the sole social role of women as remaining in the home. This project builds on the PIs existing PhD research on design, electrical technology and national identity in 1920s Ireland. The project will engage in project partnership with the National Museum of Ireland Country Life (NMI), the main centre for research into the material culture of rural Ireland, and includes an intergenerational oral history project with members of the Irish Countrywomens Association (ICA). It will work with the organisation historically responsible for rural electrification, the ESB, civic and third sector organisations for the elderly and museums with electrical product collections, in order to promote collaboration, knowledge exchange and community engagement. It is extremely important that this oral history research be carried out now, as this generation of women are in their 70s and 80s, and it is vital to record their first-hand testimony now. It will also produce creative and academic outputs, including a website, social media, exhibition and events programme, which will allow elderly womens voices to be heard and valued in a public forum and contribute to their wellbeing. It is also very timely from an academic point of view, due to the increasing interest in post-war domesticity in Irish history and area studies, where object-based analysis is not well developed, and the project will foreground the usefulness of design historical methods in understanding the materiality of post-war life. The research will be of direct interest to the generation of women who ran such homes, as well as a wider public in Ireland and the Irish diaspora who grew up in such interiors. The initial direct benefit would be to elderly Irish women by contributing to their wellbeing and sense of value in the community. The research collaborations with museums will also benefit them by aiding them in their interpretation of their collections and emphasising their contemporary relevance. Other beneficiaries would be age charities and nursing homes, as the oral history research could later be incorporated into reminiscence therapy, both in residential care and in the community. In terms of collaboration and leadership activities, the overall project would be relevant to researchers in the fields of Irish design, technology and design history, Irish history and Irish Studies, as well as researchers working on the home in other national contexts (e.g. UK, Denmark, USA, etc.); also anyone with an interest in the cultural context of electrical products, including product designers, engineers and interior designers. The study will be located within design history, but with influence from the history of technology and social history, making use of oral history, archival research and object analysis. It would also contribute specifically to the national discourse on Irish design, opening it up to an engagement with issues concerning domesticity and the role of women and technology. It would be the first research project of this scale on Irish design history, and by expanding the outputs past academic publication, would provide an example of best practice for researchers in both Irish design history and for other researchers considering material objects in a historical context.

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