King Ranch Inc.

Kingsville, TX, United States

King Ranch Inc.

Kingsville, TX, United States

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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Only known vehicle to have been signed twice by a U.S. president will be the highlight of a Barrett Jackson auction in West Palm Beach. ​​​​​​The prestigious auction company Barrett Jackson announced this week that a white 2009 King Ranch F-150 4X4 pickup autographed twice by President George W. Bush would be auctioned on Saturday April 8 at approximately 3:30pm at the South Florida Fairgrounds. The event will be broadcast nationwide on the Velocity channel. Since the announcement was made public, the auction has generated tremendous interest on social media.  The truck was purchased by Allan Jones, the founder and CEO of Check Into Cash in 2013 at that year’s Palm Beach Barrett Jackson auction. Prior to the auction, Bush kept the truck at his Prairie Chapel Ranch in Crawford, TX after he left the White House in 2009. It still has the original license plates. “We originally bought the President’s truck to benefit the National Guard Youth Foundation and always intended to resell it for charity,” said Jones. “I never imagined the F-150 would become such a collectible because the President autographed it not just once – but twice!” Jones explained that after he purchased the truck in 2013, the Bush signature was accidentally washed off during routine maintenance. When he realized what had happened, Jones asked the President if he would sign it again so that truck could be resold for charity. “President Bush graciously agreed to help us and the rest is history,” Jones said. “He autographed the F-150 in the exact same location on the right airbag panel. Once word got out, everyone wanted to know when the auction was taking place.” Jones, a regular on Fox News, also gained national attention for rescuing Hardwick Clothes – America’s oldest tailor-made clothing manufacturer – from bankruptcy in 2014. He is well-known for donating to youth sports. The businessman donated wrestling buildings to two high schools in his hometown of Cleveland, TN, and donated the Allan Jones Aquatic Center to the University of Tennessee at Knoxville in 2008. Jones also received national attention in 2011 when he partnered with Randy Boyd (formerly Tennessee’s Economic & Community Development Commissioner and a leading candidate for governor) on the Tennessee Achieves program to ensure every graduating high school senior in Bradley County, TN, could attend college free of charge. The landmark program was such a success that it was later renamed “Tennessee Promise” and adopted statewide by Gov. Bill Haslam. Most recently, Jones was given the 2017 Distinguished Service Award by the Tennessee Interscholastic Athletic Administrator’s Association for his philanthropy to local schools. Jones has designated that all the proceeds from the April 8 sale of the truck will go to the Community Foundation of Cleveland and Bradley County, TN [a community based 501 (C) (3) qualified charity] for the further designated purpose of supporting one of the nation’s top youth wrestling clubs (the Higher Calling Wrestling Club, Inc. in Tennessee) and the Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo, IA that benefits youth wrestling - named after the most dominant wrestler in history. “Dan Gable is a wrestling legend whose name is famous all over the world,” said Jones. “He had a high school and college record of 181-1 and as an Olympic competitor in the Munich Games of 1972, he brought home the Gold Medal and was undefeated and un-scored upon.  As a college wrestler at Iowa State University, he was a two-time NCAA champion/three-time finalist and as a coach brought Iowa 15 NCAA titles – nine in a row from 1978 to 1986 - and 21 straight Big Ten team titles, not to mention Coach of the Year three times.  It is our pleasure to honor this legend and help continue the fine work that he does.” Gable noted even before the 2017 auction, the Bush truck had raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for veterans and Wounded Warrior programs. “Now, thanks to Janie and Allan Jones and the new purchaser, this special truck will help countless young boys and girls participating in many wrestling programs,” said Gable. “It will also benefit the Dan Gable Museum’s expansion of its Teaching Center, Wrestling Room, Theater and Museum.” Gable added: “The monies from this auction will benefit thousands of youth wrestlers in the next few years as well as the museum. This is history.” See Barrett-Jackson.com or click http://bit.ly/2mPJZAT for more on the West Palm Beach auction.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

The only known vehicle to have been signed twice by a U.S. president will be the highlight of a Barrett Jackson auction in West Palm Beach ​The prestigious auction company Barrett Jackson announced this week that a white 2009 King Ranch F-150 4X4 pickup autographed twice by President George W. Bush would be auctioned on Saturday April 8 at approximately 3:30pm at the South Florida Fairgrounds. The event will be broadcast nationwide on the Velocity channel. Since the announcement was made public, the auction has generated tremendous interest on social media. The truck was purchased by Allan Jones, the founder and CEO of Check Into Cash in 2013 at that year's Palm Beach Barrett Jackson auction. Prior to the auction, Bush kept the truck at his Prairie Chapel Ranch in Crawford, TX after he left the White House in 2009. It still has the original license plates. "We originally bought the President's truck to benefit the National Guard Youth Foundation and always intended to resell it for charity," said Jones. "I never imagined the F-150 would become such a collectible because the President autographed it not just once - but twice!" Jones explained that after he purchased the truck in 2013, the Bush signature was accidentally washed off during routine maintenance. When he realized what had happened, Jones asked the President if he would sign it again so that truck could be resold for charity. "President Bush graciously agreed to help us and the rest is history," Jones said. "He autographed the F-150 in the exact same location on the right airbag panel. Once word got out, everyone wanted to know when the auction was taking place." Jones, a regular on Fox News, also gained national attention for rescuing Hardwick Clothes - America's oldest tailor-made clothing manufacturer - from bankruptcy in 2014. He is well-known for donating to youth sports. The businessman donated wrestling buildings to two high schools in his hometown of Cleveland, TN, and donated the Allan Jones Aquatic Center to the University of Tennessee at Knoxville in 2008. Jones also received national attention in 2011 when he partnered with Randy Boyd (formerly Tennessee's Economic & Community Development Commissioner and a leading candidate for governor) on the Tennessee Achieves program to ensure every graduating high school senior in Bradley County, TN, could attend college free of charge. The landmark program was such a success that it was later renamed "Tennessee Promise" and adopted statewide by Gov. Bill Haslam. Most recently, Jones was given the 2017 Distinguished Service Award by the Tennessee Interscholastic Athletic Administrator's Association for his philanthropy to local schools. Jones has designated that all the proceeds from the April 8 sale of the truck will go to the Community Foundation of Cleveland and Bradley County, TN [a community based 501 (C) (3) qualified charity] for the further designated purpose of supporting one of the nation's top youth wrestling clubs (the Higher Calling Wrestling Club, Inc. in Tennessee) and the Dan Gable Museum in Waterloo, IA that benefits youth wrestling - named after the most dominant wrestler in history. "Dan Gable is a wrestling legend whose name is famous all over the world," said Jones. "He had a high school and college record of 180-1 and as an Olympic competitor in the Munich Games of 1972, he brought home the Gold Medal and was un-scored upon. As a college coach, he was a two-time NCAA champion and brought Iowa 15 NCAA titles - nine in a row from 1978 to 1986 - and 21 Big Ten team titles, not to mention Coach of the Year three times. It is our pleasure to honor this legend and help continue the fine work that he does." Gable noted even before the 2017 auction, the Bush truck had raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for veterans and Wounded Warrior programs. "Now, thanks to Janie and Allan Jones and the new purchaser, this special truck will help countless young boys and girls participating in many wrestling programs," said Gable. "It will also benefit the Dan Gable Museum's expansion of its Teaching Center, Wrestling Room, Theater and Museum." Gable added: "The monies from this auction will benefit thousands of youth wrestlers in the next few years as well as the museum. This is history." See Barrett-Jackson.com or click http://bit.ly/2mPJZAT for more on the West Palm Beach auction.


Foley A.M.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Deyoung R.W.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Hewitt D.G.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Hellickson M.W.,King Ranch Inc. | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Mammalogy | Year: 2015

In species where defense of females or resources attractive to females is not an option, males search for mates. How males locate mates is not well understood. Male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are assumed to search widely for females in estrus; but the rut (2-4 weeks) and estrus (1-2 days) are short and males would benefit by having a strategy to locate mates. Because females typically have small home-range sizes and exhibit site fidelity, we predicted males would spend time in small focal areas containing females during rut. We fitted 102 males with GPS collars across 5 breeding seasons in South Texas. During rut, movement rates increased but most males used a small portion (26-34%) of their home ranges. Most males had ≥ 2 small focal areas (18-33 ha) which were revisited every 20-28 h. Because estrus is ∼24 h, males may revisit focal areas to assess female receptiveness. During peak rut, 1 year olds had the lowest movement rates and rates were similar in 2- and ≥ 3-year-old males. However, most 2 year-old males exhibited Levy walks, an efficient search strategy when resources are rare. One-year-old males may not have exerted high effort, whereas most 2 year olds used a different strategy because of competition or lack of experience. Our results provide the first fine-scale description of ungulate mate-searching behavior and how spatial memory may be important for acquiring mating opportunities in species that rove for mates. © 2015 American Society of Mammalogists, .


Foley A.M.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Hewitt D.G.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | DeYoung C.A.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | DeYoung R.W.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Schnupp M.J.,King Ranch Inc.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

White-tailed deer are a culturally and economically important game species in North America, especially in South Texas. The recent discovery of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in captive deer facilities in Texas has increased concern about the potential emergence of CWD in free-ranging deer. The concern is exacerbated because much of the South Texas region is a semi-arid environment with variable rainfall, where precipitation is strongly correlated with fawn recruitment. Further, the marginally productive rangelands, in combination with erratic fawn recruitment, results in populations that are frequently density-independent, and thus sensitive to additive mortality. It is unknown how a deer population in semi-arid regions would respond to the presence of CWD. We used long-term empirical datasets from a lightly harvested (2% annual harvest) population in conjunction with 3 prevalence growth rates from CWD afflicted areas (0.26%, 0.83%, and 2.3% increases per year) via a multistage partially deterministic model to simulate a deer population for 25 years under four scenarios: 1) without CWD and without harvest, 2) with CWD and without harvest, 3) with CWD and male harvest only, and 4) with CWD and harvest of both sexes. The modeled populations without CWD and without harvest averaged a 1.43% annual increase over 25 years; incorporation of 2% annual harvest of both sexes resulted in a stable population. The model with slowest CWD prevalence rate growth (0.26% annually) without harvest resulted in stable populations but the addition of 1% harvest resulted in population declines. Further, the male age structure in CWD models became skewed to younger age classes. We incorporated fawn:doe ratios from three CWD afflicted areas in Wisconsin and Wyoming into the model with 0.26% annual increase in prevalence and populations did not begin to decline until ∼10%, ∼16%, and ∼26% of deer were harvested annually. Deer populations in variable environments rely on high adult survivorship to buffer the low and erratic fawn recruitment rates. The increase in additive mortality rates for adults via CWD negatively impacted simulated population trends to the extent that hunter opportunity would be greatly reduced. Our results improve understanding of the potential influences of CWD on deer populations in semi-arid environments with implications for deer managers, disease ecologists, and policy makers. © 2016 Foley et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Parent C.J.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Parent C.J.,Michigan State University | Hernandez F.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Brennan L.A.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Wildlife Management | Year: 2016

Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) populations have declined across their range. The decline is associated with broad-scale losses of their habitats. Additionally, the presence of essential, structural features provided by vegetation in the remaining habitats is contingent on variable spatial and temporal trends in precipitation. This complicates the management of the bobwhite's habitats. We modeled counts of bobwhite coveys as a function of landscape structure and precipitation covariates from arid landscapes in southern Texas. Our results indicated that numbers of coveys in landscapes with greater amounts of woody cover were predicted to be highly independent of precipitation. This has important management implications because certain landscape structures associated with woody cover buffer bobwhite populations from drought. To facilitate management based on our results, we mapped our model predictions for covey counts. This allows managers to spatially prioritize where management interventions need to occur, and evaluate the potential efficacy for these interventions to create positive bobwhite population responses. © 2015 The Wildlife Society.


Foley A.M.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Deyoung R.W.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Lukefahr S.D.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Lewis J.S.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Mammalogy | Year: 2012

Antler traits are both genetically determined and environmentally influenced. However, the degree to which environmental factors affect antler expression has rarely been quantified. We captured 30 to 150 male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) annually at 7 South Texas sites during 1985 to 2009 to determine repeatability of antler traits from a semiarid environment with variable rainfall. Repeatability is defined as the intraclass correlation between repeated measures of the same trait over time. Repeatability was moderate to high (0.420.82) for all antler traits. Overall, number of antler points had the lowest repeatability, whereas inside spread of main beams and length of main beams had the highest repeatability. Repeatability of total antler score and number of antler points from sites with variable rainfall was 16 and 24 lower than sites with consistent rainfall, respectively. Sites with variable rainfall had 1318 higher repeatability when enhanced nutrition was available. Studies of cervids reveal a tendency for lower repeatability of antler traits as the environmental conditions become more variable. The association between repeatability and variable environmental conditions illustrates the magnitude of environmental effects and supports the role of antlers as an honest advertisement of individual condition or quality. Our results help to understand potential of microevolution in antlers and have implications for sexual selection and harvest management. © 2012 American Society of Mammalogists.


Moczygemba J.D.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Hewitt D.G.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Campbell T.A.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Ortega-S J.A.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | And 2 more authors.
Southwestern Naturalist | Year: 2012

Information related to home ranges of the nilgai antelope (Boselaphus tragocamelus) was needed to estimate spread of cattle-fever ticks (Riphicephalus microplus and R. annulatus) and to develop management protocols. We captured, placed telemetry collars on, and monitored 10 male and 12 female nilgai antelopes during February 2006May 2008. We detected no difference between size of home ranges of males and females and determined maximum axes of home ranges of 16.3 and 13.8 km, respectively. The combination of large home ranges and large axes of home range indicates that if cattle-fever ticks are being maintained on nilgai antelopes, then the area in which these antelopes may spread ticks is great.


Schnupp M.J.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Schnupp M.J.,King Ranch Inc. | Hernandez F.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Redeker E.J.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | And 12 more authors.
Wildlife Society Bulletin | Year: 2013

Distance sampling during aerial surveys has been used extensively to estimate the density of many wildlife species. However, practical issues arise when using distance sampling during aerial surveys, such as obtaining accurate perpendicular distances. We assembled a computerized, electronic system to collect distance-sampling data (e.g., transect length, detection location, and perpendicular distance) during aerial surveys. We tested the accuracy of the system in a controlled trial and a mock survey. We also evaluated the electronic system during field surveys of northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) conducted in the Rio Grande Plains and Rolling Plains ecoregions of Texas, USA, during December 2007-2008. For comparison, we evaluated the accuracy of visual estimation of distance during a mock survey. A strong linear relationship existed between estimated and actual distances for the controlled trial (r 2 = 0.99) and mock survey (r2 = 0.98) using the electronic system. Perpendicular-distance error (i.e., absolute difference between estimated distance and actual distance) for the electronic system was low during the controlled trial (1.4 ± 0.4 m; x ± SE) and mock survey (3.0 ± 0.5 m) but not during the visual estimation of distance (10 ± 1.5 m). Estimates of bobwhite density obtained using the electronic system exhibited reasonable precision for each ecoregion during both years (CV < 20%). Perpendicular-distance error slightly increased with target distance (0.7-m increase in error for every 10-m increase in target distance). Overall, the electronic system appears to be a promising technique to estimate density of northern bobwhite and possibly other terrestrial species for which aerial-based distance sampling is appropriate. © 2013 The Wildlife Society.


Hewitt D.G.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Hewitt D.G.,Lipscomb University | Hellickson M.W.,King Ranch Inc. | Lewis J.S.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Wildlife Management | Year: 2014

The relationship of antler size at one age to that at a later age is important in cervid management, in part by defining the effects of selective harvest based on antler characteristics. We used capture and harvest records from 2,948 male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) on 5 study sites over a 10-year period to define age-antler size relationships. Antler size (Boone and Crockett score converted to cm) increased with deer age to 5 years of age, and we therefore considered males mature at ≥5 years of age. Antler size at ≥2 years of age was positively related to yearling antler size with antler size increasing 0.64 cm (SE = 0.07) for every cm of yearling antler score. Antler size at maturity increased 0.52-0.78 cm (SE = 0.05-0.12) for each cm of antler size at 2, 3, and 4 years of age. Number of yearling antler points is a criterion in some selective harvest regimes. Yearling deer with ≤3 antler points had antlers at maturity that were 32 cm (SE = 8.4 cm) smaller than deer with ≥4 antler points as yearlings. Because of a relationship between yearling antler size and antler size at later ages, selective harvest at young ages can influence antler size of deer remaining in the cohort at later ages. © 2014 The Wildlife Society. © The Wildlife Society, 2014.


Dunn B.H.,South Dakota State University | McCuistion K.C.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Atcitty D.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Rhoades R.D.,Texas A&M University-Kingsville | Delaney D.,King Ranch Inc.
Professional Animal Scientist | Year: 2011

In this case study, historic production and financial records of the cow-calf, stocker, and feedlot enterprises of a South Texas ranch for the years 2001 through 2008 were analyzed. Most of the raised calves were sold at weaning. Depending on precipitation and forage, native stocker cattle were bought during the fall and spring and marketed the following spring and summer. The ranch also managed a feedlot operation, buying feeder cattle and selling finished cattle to a local packer. Annual and cumulative profit or loss on a per animal basis was calculated for each enterprise. For comparison, a retained ownership scenario was developed using the accumulated costs and returns from representative cattle of ranch origin retained through the stocker and finishing phase. When compared with retained ownership, the historic production and marketing plan resulted in greater (P > 0.01) per animal equivalent annual ($300 versus $8) and cumulative ($2,397 versus $62) net income. By strategically using arbitrage, ranch-raised calves were sold on average for 2.8% more per kilogram than purchased stocker calves. The 340-kg stocker calves were sold for 4.0% more per kilogram than purchased feeder calves. Fed cattle were sold almost equal with the market, at a discount of less than 1.0% over the 8-yr average. When compared with retained ownership, the historic production and marketing plan resulted in greater (P > 0.01) asset turnover ratio (37 versus 16%). Arbitrage allowed the ranch to fully use all of the value nuances in the cattle market to its advantage. In addition, increasing asset turnover ratio provided a method to take a relatively low profit margin business and create additional wealth. © 2011 American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists.

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