Lahore, Pakistan

King Edward Medical University formerly known as King Edward Medical College is the oldest medical school in Pakistan. Mayo Hospital is the attached hospital, which was built in 1872 and was named after Lord Mak Mayo. King Edward Medical University is the oldest educational institute in Pakistan. King Edward Medical University is supervising Seven Tertiary care hospitals in Lahore as its teaching Hospitals. Wikipedia.


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The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Abdul Qayyum Rana, MD, Neurologist, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Rana is a highly-trained and qualified neurologist with an extensive expertise in all facets of his work, especially Parkinson’s disease and movement disorders. Dr. Rana has been in practice for more than 15 years and is currently serving patients in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Dr. Abdul Qayyum Rana’s career in medicine began when he graduated with his Medical Degree from King Edward Medical University in Lahore, Pakistan. Dr. Rana completed his postgraduate training at the University of Ottawa in Ottawa, Ontario. Dr. Rana is board certified by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and keeps up to date with the latest advances in his field through his professional membership with numerous organizations including the Movement Disorders Society, the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society, the Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation, and the Ontario Medical Association. For his excellence, Dr. Rana received a Wayne Hening Award, has earned the coveted title of Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, and has been listed in the Who Is Who in the World. After completing his training, Dr. Rana started the “Parkinson’s Clinic of Eastern Toronto”, a multidisciplinary facility for the care of Parkinson’s patients. Having always had a great passion for Parkinson’s Disease, he began educating patients about the debilitating effects of this neurological illness. World Parkinson’s Program was then founded by Dr. Rana in 2008, focusing on improving the medical care of Parkinson’s patients through education, providing supportive services, and advocacy in all parts of the world. Dr. Rana has authored over 500 papers and 13 books, and has conducted numerous seminars on Parkinson’s at both the national and international levels. He attributes his great success to being passionate about patient care, educating his patients about their medical condition, and inspiring them to take charge of their condition and feel empowered by being in control. Learn more about Dr. Rana here and be sure to read his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit: http://www.findatopdoc.com.


Naqi S.A.,King Edward Medical University
Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons Pakistan | Year: 2014

Objective: To explore the utility of peer assisted learning (PAL) in medical schools as a formal instructional tool. Study Design: Grounded theory approach. Place and Duration of Study: King Edward Medical University, Lahore, from July 2011 to December 2011. Methodology: A study was designed using semi-structured in-depth interviews to collect data from final year medical students (n=6), residents (n=4) and faculty members (n=3), selected on the basis of non-probability purposive sampling. The qualitative data thus generated was first translated in English and transcribed and organized into major categories by using a coding framework. Participants were interviewed two more times to further explore their perceptions and experiences related to emergent categories. An iterative process was employed using grounded theory analysis technique to eventually generate theory. Results: PAL was perceived as rewarding in terms of fostering higher order thinking, effective teaching skills and in improving self efficacy among learners. Conclusion: PAL can offer learning opportunity to medical students, residents and faculty members. It can improve depth of their knowledge and skills.


Aslam M.N.,King Edward Medical University
Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons Pakistan | Year: 2013

Objective: To determine the effectiveness of students' rating as a teacher evaluation tool. Study Design: Concurrent mixed method. Place and Duration of Study: King Edward Medical University, Lahore, from January to June 2010. Methodology: Anonymous 5-point Likert scale survey questionnaire was conducted involving a single class consisting of 310 students and 12 students were selected for structured interview based on non-probability purposive sampling. Informed consent was procured. They were required to rate 6 teachers and were supposed to discuss teachers' performance in detail. Quantitative data collected through survey was analyzed using SPSS 15 and qualitative data was analyzed with the help of content analysis by identifying themes and patterns from thick descriptions. This student feedback would show the effectiveness in terms of its feasibility and as an indicator of teaching attributes. Results: Descriptive statistics of quantitative data obtained from survey was used to calculate mean and standard deviation for all teachers' individually. This showed the average direction of the student ratings. Percentages of the responses calculated of teacher A were 85.96%, teacher B 65.53, teacher C 65.20%, teacher D 69.62%, teacher E 65.32% and teacher F 64.24% in terms of overall effectiveness of their teaching. Structured interviews generated qualitative data which validated the students' views about strengths and weaknesses of teachers, and helped to determine the effectiveness of their rating and feedback. Conclusion: This simple rating system clearly showed its importance and hence can be used in institutions as a regular evaluating method of teaching faculty.


Baas P.W.,Drexel University | Ahmad F.J.,King Edward Medical University
Brain | Year: 2013

Contemporary research has revealed a great deal of information on the behaviours of microtubules that underlie critical events in the lives of neurons. Microtubules in the neuron undergo dynamic assembly and disassembly, bundling and splaying, severing, and rapid transport as well as integration with other cytoskeletal elements such as actin filaments. These various behaviours are regulated by signalling pathways that affect microtubule-related proteins such as molecular motor proteins and microtubule severing enzymes, as well as a variety of proteins that promote the assembly, stabilization and bundling of microtubules. In recent years, translational neuroscientists have earmarked microtubules as a promising target for therapy of injury and disease of the nervous system. Proof-of-principle has come mainly from studies using taxol and related drugs to pharmacologically stabilize microtubules in animal models of nerve injury and disease. However, concerns persist that the negative consequences of abnormal microtubule stabilization may outweigh the positive effects. Other potential approaches include microtubule-active drugs with somewhat different properties, but also expanding the therapeutic toolkit to include intervention at the level of microtubule regulatory proteins. © 2013 The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved.


Riaz N.,King Edward Medical University
Journal of Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad : JAMC | Year: 2010

Oral cancer has a profound impact on the quality of life for patients and their families. Functionally, the mouth is an important organ for speech, swallowing, chewing, taste and salivation. These functions become compromised due to surgical ablation of the tumour. Obturator prosthesis is a common prosthdontic rehabilitative option for maxillectomy patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate how patients with maxillofacial defects evaluate their quality of life after maxillectomy and prosthodontic therapy with obturator prostheses. Thirty patients were included in the study (11 female, 19 male). The patients were interviewed by using a standardised questionnaire developed by University of Washington (UW-QOL). The detailed questionnaire was adjusted for obturator patients and internalised most parts of obturator functioning scale (OFS). Quality of life after prosthodontic therapy with obturator prostheses was 54 +/- 22.9% on average. Functioning of the obturator prosthesis, impairment of ingestion, speech and appearance, the extent of therapy, and the existence of pain had significant impact on the quality of life (p<0.005). Orofacial rehabilitation of patients with maxillofacial defects using obturator prostheses is an appropriate treatment modality. To improve the situation of patients prior to and after maxillectomy sufficient information about the treatment, adequate psychological care and speech therapy should be provided.


Awais S.M.,King Edward Medical University | Dar U.Z.,King Edward Medical University | Saeed A.,King Edward Medical University
International Orthopaedics | Year: 2012

Purpose: On 8 October 2005 a massive earthquake hit the northern mountainous areas of Pakistan and Kashmir causing 73,338 deaths and leaving over 125,000 severely injured. In a region which was less prepared for such an enormous disaster, mobilising rescue, relief and rehabilitation posed great challenges. The lead author (SMA) established two level 1 orthopaedic trauma and rehabilitation units in existing public hospitals through private philanthropy in the earthquake struck cities of Muzaffarabad in Kashmir and Mansehra in Khyber Pakhtun Khuwa (KPK) Province. The purpose was to combat the major catastrophe and later study the pattern of injuries especially amputations so as to improve the future strategies in similar scenarios. Methods: This is a retrospective descriptive study of patients suffering from injuries of the limbs due to the earthquake who were managed in these centres with special emphasis on the patients with amputated limbs. The patients were received, worked up, investigated and prepared for definitive surgical procedures, in this case amputations. All patients were provided assistance for the fitting of a prosthesis and rehabilitation by referring them to specialised centres. Results: Of 128,304 patients, 19,700 were managed in the centres established by the lead author over a period of seven months. Of these, 112 patients underwent amputations of upper and lower limbs. Conclusions: In a massive calamity over a wide geographic area away from big university hospitals, such as the 2005 Pakistan earthquake, the level 1 operating theatre facilities must be established within the area to meet the needs of the patients nearest to their homes and families, and run forever so that patients can have excellent follow-up and can use the same facilities regularly. For example, in this study we managed 112 amputees and placed them in a rehabilitation programme, and transferred these centres to the hospital authorities after five years. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Awais S.,King Edward Medical University | Saeed A.,King Edward Medical University
International Orthopaedics | Year: 2013

Purpose: On 8 October 2005 a massive earthquake hit the northern mountainous areas of Pakistan and Kashmir causing 73,338 deaths and leaving over 125,000 severely injured. In a region which was less prepared for such an enormous disaster, mobilising rescue, relief and rehabilitation posed great challenges. The first author (SMA) established two level 1 orthopaedic trauma and rehabilitation units in each of two severely hit major cities through private philanthropy. According to the severity of injuries, the patients were triaged and treated. The aim of this study is to improve the future strategies in similar scenarios. Methods: This is a retrospective review of medical records of patients suffering from musculoskeletal injuries in the aftermath of the 2005 earthquake who were managed in these centres in the order of triage priority. The patients were received, categorised, worked up and provided definitive surgical procedures. All patients were provided assistance for the fitting of a prosthesis and rehabilitation. Results: Of 128,304 (total of injured patients), 19,700 were managed in two centres established by SMA during the first months after the earthquake. Of these, 112 patients underwent amputations of upper and lower limbs. Conclusions: In a massive calamity over a wide geographical area away from big university hospitals, such as the 2005 Pakistan earthquake, the level 1 operating theatre facilities must be established within the area to meet the immediate needs of the patients nearest to their homes and families, and run forever so that patients can have excellent follow-up and can use the same facilities regularly. In the aftermath of this earthquake the need to practise triage in the first 72 hours was thoroughly realised and effectively practised in our centres © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Khawaja A.M.,King Edward Medical University
International Journal of Surgery | Year: 2011

Nanotechnology has been an ever-growing field since the discovery of carbon fullerenes, and is being assimilated progressively into a variety of other disciplines including medical science. The association with neurosurgery had initially been less well characterized compared to other organ systems, but has recently offered promising future potential for a wide range of utilities including new therapeutic options for Glioblastoma Multiforme, neurprotection against oxidative stress, nerve nanorepair, nanodiagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, nanoimaging with nanoparticles and quantum dots, nanomanipulation of CNS with surgical nanobots, and nanoneuromodulation with nanofibres & nanowires. This article examines such potentials as well as others, of the utility of nanotechnology in Neurosurgery. © 2011 Surgical Associates Ltd.


Shah A.A.,Baylor College of Medicine | Aftab A.,King Edward Medical University | Coverdale J.,Baylor College of Medicine
Journal of Psychiatric Practice | Year: 2014

Whether or not QTc interval should be routinely monitored in patients receiving antipsychotics is a controversial issue, given logistic and fiscal dilemmas. There is a link between antipsychotic medications and prolongation of QTc interval, which is associated with an increased risk of torsade de pointes (TdP). Our goal is to provide clinically practical guidelines for monitoring QTc intervals in patients being treated with antipsychotics. We provide an overview of the pathophysiology of the QT interval, its relationship to TdP, and a discussion of the QT prolonging effects of antipsychotics. A literature search for articles relevant to the QTc prolonging effects of antipsychotics and TdP was conducted utilizing the databases PubMed and Embase with various combinations of search words. The overall risk of TdP and sudden death associated with antipsychotics has been observed to be low. Medications, genetics, gender, cardiovascular status, pathological conditions, and electrolyte disturbances have been found to be related to prolongation of the QTc interval. We conclude that, while electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring is useful when administering antipsychotic medications in the presence of co-existing risk factors, it is not mandatory to perform ECG monitoring as a prerequisite in the absence of cardiac risk factors. An ECG should be performed if the initial evaluation suggests increased cardiac risk or if the antipsychotic to be prescribed has been established to have an increased risk of TdP and sudden death. © 2014 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Inc.


Mumtaz A.,King Edward Medical University
Saudi journal of kidney diseases and transplantation : an official publication of the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation, Saudi Arabia | Year: 2010

The objective of the study was to determine the level of beta2-microglobulin (beta2-m) in hemodialysis (HD) patients and the factors affecting it. This cross sectional, hospital based study was conducted between September and December 2008 at the Hemodialysis unit of Shalamar Hospital, Lahore. All patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who were on maintenance HD for more than three months were included in the study. Patients with acute renal failure and on dialysis for less than three months were excluded. Demographic data were collected and details of dialysis (type of dialyzers, dialysate bath, membrane used) were recorded. Blood samples of the patients were drawn for hematological (hemoglobin, hematocrit), biochemical (urea, creatinine, uric acid, albumin) and beta2-m level measurement. The total number of patients studied was 50. The major causes of ESRD included diabetes mellitus and hypertension seen in 37 (74%) and 10 patients (20%), respectively. The beta2-m levels were significantly elevated in the study patients; 92.6 +/- 17.1 mg/L with a range of 54 to 130 mg/L as compared to 2.0 +/- 1.29 mg/L in the control group. The patients' age had a statistically significant relationship with the beta2-m level. The major reason for increased beta2-m level was use of low-flux dialyzers. Synthetic polysulphone membrane, bicarbonate, ultra pure dialysate and duration on HD were not asso-ciated with high beta2-m levels. Also, we found an inverse relationship between beta2-m levels and serum albumin of the study patients. Our study suggests that the beta2-m levels are significantly high in dialysis patients. Use of low-flux dialyzer seems to be the major reason for the high beta2-m levels. Age and albumin have statistically significant relationship with beta2-m levels.

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