King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases

Gråsten, Denmark

King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases

Gråsten, Denmark

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Frolund J.C.,Vejle Hospital | Primdahl J.,King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases
Musculoskeletal Care | Year: 2015

Background: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have increased morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Screening for cardiovascular risk is recommended by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). There is a lack of evidence of the experiences of RA patients who are screened for CVD. Such information is important in order to organize and further develop screening programmes for CVD in patients with RA. The aim of the present study was to explore RA patients’ experiences of participation in nurse-led screening for CVD and to identify key issues for the future organization of screening programmes. Methods: Three qualitative focus group interviews were carried out with 14 outpatients diagnosed with RA. The participants were stratified into groups, depending on whether they had a low-to-moderate or high ten-year risk of cardiovascular death according to the European Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) system. Data were analysed using meaning condensation to identify key themes. Results: Five themes were identified: reactions to receiving the invitation to the screening consultation; screening consultation adapted to needs and RA; duration reflected needs; screening consultation brought a sense of relief; and motivation and sense of control. Regardless of their CV risk, the participants found it important that the screening consultation was adapted to their needs and their illness as RA had a major impact on their daily life. Conclusions: When planning future screening programmes for CVD for patients with RA, it is important that the screening consultation is individualized and tailored to patients’ needs and their RA. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


PubMed | University of Aarhus, Steno Diabetes Center, Copenhagen University, King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Immunologic research | Year: 2016

Autoimmune diseases encompass a plethora of conditions in which the immune system attacks its own tissue, identifying them as foreign. Multiple factors are thought to contribute to the development of immune response to self, including differences in genotypes, hormonal milieu, and environmental factors. Viruses including human endogenous retroviruses have long been linked to the occurrence of autoimmunity, but never proven to be causative factors. Endogenous viruses are retroviral sequences embedded in the host germline DNA and transmitted vertically through successive generations in a Mendelian manner. In this study by means of genetic epidemiology, we have searched for the involvement of endogenous retroviruses in three selected autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis. We found that at least one human endogenous retroviral locus was associated with each of the three diseases. Although there was a significant overlap, most loci only occurred in one of the studied disease. Remarkably, within each disease, there was a statistical interaction (synergy) between two loci. Additional synergy between retroviral loci and human lymphocyte antigens is reported for multiple sclerosis. We speculate the possibility that recombinants or mixed viral particles are formed and that the resulting viruses stimulate the innate immune system, thereby initiating the autoimmune response.


PubMed | Copenhagen University, King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Slagelse Hospital, Charité - Medical University of Berlin and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Arthritis & rheumatology (Hoboken, N.J.) | Year: 2016

To investigate changes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assessed inflammation and structural lesions in the sacroiliac (SI) joints during treatment with adalimumab versus placebo.In a 48-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 52 patients with spondyloarthritis were randomized to receive subcutaneous injections of either adalimumab 40 mg (n=25) or placebo (n=27) every other week for 12 weeks. Patients in the adalimumab group continued to receive and patients in the placebo group were switched to adalimumab 40 mg every other week for an additional 12 weeks. MRI of the SI joints was performed at weeks 0, 12, 24, and 48, and the images were assessed independently in a blinded manner using the modified Berlin and the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) MRI scores for inflammation and structural lesions of the SI joints.At baseline, 56% of the adalimumab group and 72% of the placebo group had an MRI-assessed inflammation score of 1. Among the patients with inflammation at baseline, the mean percent reductions in MRI scores for inflammation from week 0 to 12 were greater in the adalimumab group compared with the placebo group (Berlin method, -62% versus -5%; SPARCC method, -58% versus -12% [both P < 0.04]). Furthermore, the mean SPARCC erosion score decreased (-0.6) and the SPARCC backfill score increased (+0.8) in the adalimumab group from week 0 to week 12. From week 12 to week 24, larger absolute reductions in the Berlin/SPARCC inflammation scores and the SPARCC erosion score and larger increases in the Berlin/SPARCC fatty lesion scores were seen in the placebo group compared with the adalimumab group. In univariate regression analyses (analysis of covariance) and multivariate stepwise regression analyses, treatment with adalimumab was independently associated with regression of the SPARCC erosion score from week 0 to 12 but not with changes in the other types of MRI lesions.Significant changes in the Berlin and SPARCC MRI-assessed inflammation scores and in the SPARCC MRI-assessed erosion scores occurred within 12 weeks after initiation of adalimumab. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitor treatment was associated with resolution of erosions and the development of backfill.


PubMed | Bethesda Hospital, King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, University of Zürich, Uniklinik Balgrist and 4 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Annals of the rheumatic diseases | Year: 2016

To investigate the impact of smoking on the response to treatment with a first tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) in a real-life cohort.Patients fulfilling the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) classification criteria for axSpA in the Swiss Clinical Quality Management Cohort were included in this study. The potential association between smoking status and differential response to TNFi in terms of the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) was analysed using multiple adjusted longitudinal mixed effect models. Binary response rates at 1year were assessed with multiple adjusted logistic analyses.A first TNFi was initiated in 698 patients with axSpA with available smoking status and a baseline or follow-up BASDAI assessment, of which 490 (70%) had complete covariate data. In comparison to non-smokers, current smokers demonstrated significantly smaller reductions in BASDAI and ASDAS scores upon treatment with TNFi (0.75 BASDAI units and 0.69 ASDAS units less, p=0.005 and 0.001, respectively) for patients with elevated baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) level. This effect was numerically smaller in patients with normal CRP. The odds for reaching a 50% improvement in BASDAI response or the ASAS criteria for 40% improvement after 1year were significantly lower in current smokers than in non-smokers (0.54, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.95, p=0.03 and 0.43, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.76, p=0.004, respectively).Current smoking is associated with an impaired response to TNFi in axSpA.


PubMed | Burgerspital, University of Zürich, Bethesda Hospital, King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases and Swiss Clinical Quality Management Foundation
Type: | Journal: Arthritis research & therapy | Year: 2016

With regard to switching tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), conflicting results have been reported as to whether the effectiveness of a second TNFi depends on the reason for discontinuation of the first TNFi.Patients with a clinical diagnosis of axSpA starting a second TNFi in the Swiss Clinical Quality Management cohort were included. Effectiveness of treatment at 1year, as well as drug survival, was compared between subgroups having discontinued the first TNFi because of lack of response, adverse events (AEs), or other reasons. Lack of response was further divided into primary or secondary lack of response (PLR or SLR, respectively), depending on whether the first TNFi was stopped before or after 6months of treatment.Among 632 patients with axSpA, median survival of a second TNFi was 1.1years after PLR and 3.8years after SLR (p=0.003). At least moderate disease activity as defined by an Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score using the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ASDAS-ESR) <2.1 was achieved after 12months by 11%, 39%, 26%, and 39% of patients who discontinued their first TNFi because of PLR, SLR, AEs, and other reasons, respectively (p=0.01). Only 4% of patients achieved an ASDAS-ESR inactive disease state after PLR, in comparison to 22% of those after SLR. Similar results were demonstrated in patients fulfilling the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society classification criteria for axSpA (n=488): ASDAS-ESR <2.1 was achieved after 12months by 9%, 41%, 29%, and 39% of patients who discontinued their first TNFi because of PLR, SLR, AEs, and other reasons, respectively (p=0.01).The effectiveness of a second TNFi is significantly impaired in patients with axSpA after PLR to a first TNFi compared with SLR.


Ciurea A.,University of Zürich | Scherer A.,Swiss Clinical Quality Management Foundation | Weber U.,King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases | Bernhard J.,Burgerspital | And 8 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2015

Objectives To investigate the impact of smoking on the response to treatment with a first tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) in a real-life cohort. Methods Patients fulfilling the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) classification criteria for axSpA in the Swiss Clinical Quality Management Cohort were included in this study. The potential association between smoking status and differential response to TNFi in terms of the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) was analysed using multiple adjusted longitudinal mixed effect models. Binary response rates at 1 year were assessed with multiple adjusted logistic analyses. Results A first TNFi was initiated in 698 patients with axSpA with available smoking status and a baseline or follow-up BASDAI assessment, of which 490 (70%) had complete covariate data. In comparison to non-smokers, current smokers demonstrated significantly smaller reductions in BASDAI and ASDAS scores upon treatment with TNFi (0.75 BASDAI units and 0.69 ASDAS units less, p=0.005 and 0.001, respectively) for patients with elevated baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) level. This effect was numerically smaller in patients with normal CRP. The odds for reaching a 50% improvement in BASDAI response or the ASAS criteria for 40% improvement after 1 year were significantly lower in current smokers than in non-smokers (0.54, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.95, p=0.03 and 0.43, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.76, p=0.004, respectively). Conclusions Current smoking is associated with an impaired response to TNFi in axSpA. © 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & European League Against Rheumatism.


Ciurea A.,University of Zürich | Scherer A.,Swiss Clinical Quality Management Foundation | Weber U.,King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases | Bernhard J.,Burgerspital | And 8 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2016

Objectives: To investigate the impact of smoking on the response to treatment with a first tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) in a real-life cohort. Methods: Patients fulfilling the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) classification criteria for axSpA in the Swiss Clinical Quality Management Cohort were included in this study. The potential association between smoking status and differential response to TNFi in terms of the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) was analysed using multiple adjusted longitudinal mixed effect models. Binary response rates at 1 year were assessed with multiple adjusted logistic analyses. Results: A first TNFi was initiated in 698 patients with axSpA with available smoking status and a baseline or follow-up BASDAI assessment, of which 490 (70%) had complete covariate data. In comparison to non-smokers, current smokers demonstrated significantly smaller reductions in BASDAI and ASDAS scores upon treatment with TNFi (0.75 BASDAI units and 0.69 ASDAS units less, p=0.005 and 0.001, respectively) for patients with elevated baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) level. This effect was numerically smaller in patients with normal CRP. The odds for reaching a 50% improvement in BASDAI response or the ASAS criteria for 40% improvement after 1 year were significantly lower in current smokers than in nonsmokers (0.54, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.95, p=0.03 and 0.43, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.76, p=0.004, respectively). Conclusions: Current smoking is associated with an impaired response to TNFi in axSpA.


Mandl P.,Medical University of Vienna | Navarro-Compan V.,Leiden University | Terslev L.,Copenhagen University | Aegerter P.,Ambroise Pare Hospital | And 18 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2015

A taskforce comprised of an expert group of 21 rheumatologists, radiologists and methodologists from 11 countries developed evidence-based recommendations on the use of imaging in the clinical management of both axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA). Twelve key questions on the role of imaging in SpA were generated using a process of discussion and consensus. Imaging modalities included conventional radiography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, dual-emission x-ray absorptiometry and scintigraphy. Experts applied research evidence obtained from systematic literature reviews using MEDLINE and EMBASE to develop a set of 10 recommendations. The strength of recommendations (SOR) was assessed by taskforce members using a visual analogue scale. A total of 7550 references were identified in the search process, from which 158 studies were included in the systematic review. Ten recommendations were produced using research-based evidence and expert opinion encompassing the role of imaging in making a diagnosis of axial SpA or peripheral SpA, monitoring inflammation and damage, predicting outcome, response to treatment, and detecting spinal fractures and osteoporosis. The SOR for each recommendation was generally very high (range 8.9-9.5). These are the first recommendations which encompass the entire spectrum of SpA and evaluate the full role of all commonly used imaging modalities. We aimed to produce recommendations that are practical and valuable in daily practice for rheumatologists, radiologists and general practitioners. © 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & European League Against Rheumatism.


Horslev-Petersen K.,King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases | Horslev-Petersen K.,University of Southern Denmark | Hetland M.L.,Glostrup Hospital | Hetland M.L.,Copenhagen University | And 20 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2014

Objectives: An investigator-initiated, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, treat-to-target protocol (Clinical Trials: NCT00660647) studied whether adalimumab added to methotrexate and intra-articular triamcinolone as first-line treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) increased the frequency of low disease activity (DAS28CRP<3.2) at 12 months. Methods In 14 Danish hospital-based clinics, 180 disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD)-naïve ERA patients (<6 months duration) received methotrexate 7.5 mg/week (increased to 20 mg/week within 2 months) plus adalimumab 40 mg every other week (adalimumab-group, n=89) or methotrexate +placebo-adalimumab (placebo-group, n=91). At all visits, triamcinolone was injected into swollen joints (max. four joints/visit). If low disease activity was not achieved, sulfasalazine 2 g/day and hydroxychloroquine 200 mg/day were added after 3 months, and open-label biologics after 6-9 months. Efficacy was assessed primarily on the proportion of patients who reached treatment target (DAS28CRP<3.2). Secondary endpoints included DAS28CRP, remission, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), EQ-5D and SF-12. Analysis was by intention-to-treat with last observation carried forward. Results Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. In the adalimumab group/placebo group the 12-month cumulative triamcinolone doses were 5.4/7.0 ml (p=0.08). Triple therapy was applied in 18/27 patients (p=0.17). At 12 months, DAS28CRP<3.2 was reached in 80%/76% (p=0.65) and DAS28CRP was 2.0 (1.7-5.2) (medians (5th/95th percentile ranges)), versus 2.6 (1.7-4.7) (p=0.009). Remission rates were: DAS28CRP<2.6:74%/49%, Clinical Disease Activity Index≤2.8:61%/41%, Simplified Disease Activity Index<3.3:57%/37%, European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology Boolean: 48%/30% (0.0008


PubMed | Medizinische Universitatsklinik Innsbruck, King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet and Deutsche Vereinigung Morbus Bechterew e. V.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Zeitschrift fur Rheumatologie | Year: 2016

Documentation of the severity of the disease in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) can represent a clinical challenge, especially as the course of SpA can be very different. Patients with SpA often complain of symptoms, such as pain, fatigue and stiffness as well as limitations in mental functions and social participation. This wide range of functional impairments could so far only be insufficiently documented and not with one single measurement instrument. Despite various attempts in recent years, experts could not reach agreement on a definition of the severity and documentation of the extent of the severity. This was the starting point for the development of the ASAS health index presented here, which initially focused on patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This questionnaire serves to document the health and functional ability of patients with AS and has been available since 2015 as the original english version of the ASAS health index together with the accompanying environmental factors set. This article describes the German translation and transcultural adaptation of the ASAS health index and the accompanying environmental factors set.

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