Kimron Veterinary Institute

Beit Jann, Israel

Kimron Veterinary Institute

Beit Jann, Israel
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Elad D.,Kimron Veterinary Institute
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2013

The emergence of immunosuppressive human diseases and therapies in the last decades has raised the question of the risks and benefits for this group of patients deriving from their interaction with pets and the necessity to balance them in the best interest of the pet owner. Risks are related to the possibility of contracting zoonotic infections that are more severe and occasionally lethal in immunocompromised patients. To mitigate the risks and allow the owner to keep the pet, guidelines have been devised. The cooperation and communication between the owner, the physician and the veterinarian are fundamental for a rational approach in evaluating of the potential health risks associated with pets as sources of zoonotic diseases. The final decision should, however, be made by the owner, who alone will enjoy the benefits of the relationship but also be the one to bear the consequences. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Elad D.,Kimron Veterinary Institute
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2011

Fungi belonging to the Scedosporium/. Pseudallescheria complex (SPCF) have been known to cause human infections for nearly a century and are important human pathogens, with an increasing frequency of infection in patients with underlying conditions. There appears to be a lower incidence of infections with SPCF in veterinary species, although this may be related to a lack of awareness of these diseases. Important recent taxonomic changes in this group of fungi include the classification of Pseudallescheria boydii and Scedosporium apiospermum as two distinct species and the identification of new pathogenic species of SPCF. In this article, the literature on natural and experimental infections caused by SPCF in veterinary species is reviewed. The importance of an accurate identification of veterinary isolates by molecular methods is stressed, especially since virulence and susceptibility to antimycotic drugs of different species may vary. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


The history of recorded cases of anthrax in human beings and animals from 1909 to 2012 in the area between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea is reviewed. The disease was endemic until the middle of the 20th century, but the incidence decreased thereafter, with only sporadic cases from the 1980s onwards. Human cases have not been diagnosed in the region since 1984 and the number of episodes of animal disease has reduced to less than one per year. This decline is mostly due to the disruption of the infective cycle by improved veterinary control, including vaccination, treatment and outbreak management. A policy of reactive vaccination for 10. years of affected herds and herds grazing in their proximity has been applied. No new outbreaks have been observed in such herds after the cessation of vaccination, despite continued grazing on the same sites, so it is assumed that spore survival in such areas is shorter than 10. years. This is independent of the soil composition, which is calcareous throughout most of the relevant area. However, reemergence of anthrax, even after decades, has occurred following disturbance and heavy rainfall. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Patent
Kimron Veterinary Institute and Tel Aviv University | Date: 2015-02-11

The present invention relates to vaccine compositions comprising attenuated strain of Tilapia Lake Virus (TiLV) for protecting tilapia fish against infection by (TiLV). The invention also relates to methods for using the vaccines to protect tilapines from TiLV-induced disease.


Patent
Kimron Veterinary Institute | Date: 2014-05-11

An isolated polynucleotide is disclosed which comprises a nucleic acid sequence of a Brucella phage, the nucleic acid sequence being specific to the Brucella phage and comprising a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 387-393. An exemplary polynucleotide sequence is one which comprises at least 100 consecutive nucleotides of a nucleic acid sequence as set forth in SEQ ID NO: 396. Uses of such sequences are further disclosed.


Patent
Kimron Veterinary Institute | Date: 2010-10-07

An isolated polynucleotide is disclosed which comprises a nucleic acid sequence of a Brucella phage, the nucleic acid sequence being specific to the Brucella phage and comprising a sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NOs: 387-393. An exemplary polyncucleotide sequence is one which comprises at least 100 consecutive nucleotides of a nucleic acid sequence as set forth in SEQ ID NO: 396. Uses of such sequences are further disclosed.


Patent
Kimron Veterinary Institute and Institute Pasteur Paris | Date: 2014-03-31

Neuroinvasive and neurovirulent strain of the West Nile virus, named IS-98-ST1, nucleic acid molecules derived from its genome, proteins and peptides encoded by said nucleic acid molecules, and uses thereof.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2010.1.3-05 | Award Amount: 1.21M | Year: 2010

This European surveillance network for influenza in pigs (ESNIP) 3 will maintain and expand surveillance networks established during previous EC concerted actions (ESNIP 1, QLK2-CT-2000-01636; ESNIP 2, SSPE-022749). Three work packages (WP 2, 3, 4) aim to increase the knowledge of the epidemiology and evolution of swine influenza (SI) virus (SIV) in European pigs through organised field surveillance programmes (WP2). Virus strains detected in these programmes will be subjected to detailed characterisation both antigenically (WP3) and genetically (WP4) using standardised methodology. Specifically this will involve timely information on genomic data and generation of antigenic maps using the latest technology. These analyses will provide significant and timely added value to knowledge of SIV. A strong focus will be monitoring spread and independent evolution of pandemic H1N1 2009 virus in pigs. All these data will in turn be used to improve the diagnosis of SI by updating the reagents used in the recommended techniques (WP2). The virus bank and electronic database that were established during ESNIPs 1 and 2 will also be expanded and formally curated with relevant SIV isolates and information for global dissemination within and outwith the consortium (WP5). ESNIP 3 represents the only organised surveillance network for influenza in pigs and seeks to strengthen formal interactions with human and avian surveillance networks previously established in ESNIP 2. A timely and transparent interaction with these networks will be a key output. These approaches are entirely consistent with improved pandemic preparedness and planning for human influenza whilst providing an evidence base for decisions in relation to veterinary health. The project consortium consists of 24 participants, which contribute a blend of different specialisms and skills ensuring multi-disciplinary cutting-edge outputs. The vast majority of the partners are actively working with SIV including in a field setting. Twenty-one participants are from 11 EU member states, seven of which were actively involved in ESNIP 2. Co-operation with partners in China and North America will continue to promote a greater understanding of the epidemiology of SIVs at a global level.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2008-1.1.2 | Award Amount: 9.32M | Year: 2009

Europe possesses several experiment facilities holding the level 3 of bio safety, which is required to study the large majority of zoonoses, emerging diseases and a number of other animal infectious diseases. Most of them are nevertheless loosely connected, leading to redundancy. NAIF has as its strategic aim to realise the potential European leadership in animal infectiology by bringing together 14 L3 animal experiment infrastructures and organising the facilities in order to optimize their investigation and diagnostic/validation tools, achieve economies of scale and use the saved resources to modernise existing facilities in a coordinated manner. To achieve these goals, NADIR will 1) internally, upgrade the collaboration between the partners by setting an Internet-based joint workspace, strengthening the share of knowledge, best practices and ethical considerations, commonly managing biological resources, organising transnational access to the involved infrastructures, and jointly executing research activities designed to improve the services provided by these facilities; 2) externally, enhance access to the networks infrastructures by setting up a electronic portal presenting all the infrastructures and services offered by the network in a unified way, providing access of non-member institutions to these infrastructures, coordinating actions with other relevant initiatives, and jointly presenting safety and ethical recommendations. NADIR is organised around four types of activities: i) three networking activities, consisting of internal and external communication, knowledge and best practices sharing, and biological resources joint management; ii) three research activities, made up of characterising animal lines, improvement of infection monitoring tools, and development of new infection models for emerging diseases; iii) as many transnational access activities as infrastructures involved in the network; iv) one project management work package.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2008-1-3-02 | Award Amount: 4.09M | Year: 2009

Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the worlds most infectious diseases of livestock and continues to pose a significant threat to endemic and free regions alike. The impact of FMD on society and international trade is high, thereby demanding stringent prevention, surveillance and control plans taken up in crisis preparedness plans. On the other hand, there is a global increased demand for animal welfare and ethical considerations necessitating a decreased reliance on eradication of animals to control FMD virus (FMDV) spread, and on the use of animals for the regulatory testing of veterinary products. The project seeks to balance these apparently contracting viewpoints by addressing specific gaps in our knowledge on all aspects of FMD control to enable implementation of enhanced animal-sparing vaccine-based control strategies tailored to the needs of free and endemic settings. Consequently, four main objectives have been identified, including (i) the improvement of the quality of existing FMD vaccines and diagnostics, (ii) the refinement and replacement of in vivo FMD vaccine quality tests, (iii) the development of new generation FMD vaccines and diagnostics by applying cutting edge technologies, and (iv) the enhancement of our knowledge on FMDV spread and transmission following the use of high-potency monovalent or multivalent vaccines. The role of wildlife (buffalo, gazelles and wild boar) in FMDV maintenance and transmission will also be investigated. The project consists of seven different, yet interlinked, work packages (WP) each addressing one of the items listed in the Work Programme topic KBBE-2008-1-3-02, and led by renowned WP leaders with years of relevant experience in the field of FMD. As such, significant progress towards the objectives of the Communitys Animal Health Strategy (2007-2013), the European Technology Platform for Global Animal Health, and the Global Roadmap for improving the Tools to Control FMD in Endemic Settings will be achieved.

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