The Japanese Experiment Module , also known with the nickname Kibo , is a Japanese science module for the International Space Station developed by JAXA. It is the largest single ISS module. The first two pieces of the module were launched on Space Shuttle missions STS-123 and STS-124. The third and final components were launched on STS-127. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-12-2016 | Award Amount: 6.76M | Year: 2016

IMPACT GROWTH will fund 4 European Superstar Startups (unicorn potential) confirmed by top VC investors and global corporates of 4 smart verticals: cities, digital content, agrifood and factories 48 companies exploiting Future Internet research results will be discovered out of a deal flow of 5.000 startups through 4 OpenCalls. They will join an acceleration programme and will start a crowdfunding track. A live due diligence from the acceleration and the market response through the crowd will select the best companies. 4 out of the 48 startups will succeed in reaching the 1.5 million euros crowd funded investment led by the VCs and platforms in the consortium leveraging the 6 million euros of public funding with 6 additional million euros of private investment. The IMPACT GROWTH consortium includes: Mobile World Congress as the reference digital mobile event in the planet; 4 corporates including Danone, Ferrovial, NTT DOCOMO BuonGiorno and MADE (integrates LEGO and Vestas among others); FIWARE Foundation to guarantee the proper exploitation of research results aligning them with other FIWARE initiatives; Accelerace and Kibo Ventures as top VCs; ISDI as leading FIWARE accelerator; FundingBox as leading European startups funding platform; INVESDOR as first global crowdfunded platform with MiFID license and ISDI Mexico that will reinforce EC objectives of globalizing the Future Internet efforts via Mexico and as a pilot on how to engage with Plug & Play and Tel Aviv Go Global joining the project via LoI; PARP, the agency for startups in Poland, will support the consortium via LoI to pilot the adoption of best practices for ESIF purposes under Smart Specialization Strategies for regions. IMPACT GROWTH will help demonstrate that public funded research results with a continuity approach (continued support from seed to initial series round) can help top startups become European Superstars and can turn the EU into the EU of entrepreneurial states.


News Article | March 16, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

Sometimes, distance can lend a new perspective to a problem. For Japanese researchers studying protein crystal growth, that distance was 250 miles up—the altitude at which the International Space Station (ISS) orbits the Earth. To better isolate the growth of protein crystals from the effects of gravity, the group of Katsuo Tsukamoto in Tohoku University's Department of Earth and Planetary Science in Sendai, Japan, and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency grew crystals in a specially-designed chamber onboard the ISS. The researchers monitored the very slow growth and dissolution rate—approximately one centimeter per second of the crystals by laser interferometry. This was the first time the technique had been used onboard the ISS to measure the growth rate of the crystals at various temperatures. To observe this, Yamazaki and his colleagues developed unique growth cells suitable for long-term projects, for about six months. "We are interested in the growth mechanisms of a space-grown protein crystal—a lysozyme crystal—as a model crystal to understand why space-grown crystals sometimes do show better quality than the Earth-grown crystals," said Tomoya Yamazaki, a ddoctorate student in Tsukamoto's lab. Tsukamoto and his colleagues, which includes collaborators at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Japan Space Forum, Olympus Optical Corporation, detail their elegant growth method this week in Review of Scientific Instruments. The experimental process, known as NanoStep, was performed in the Japanese Experimental Module (KIBO) of the International Space Station in 2012. Tsukamoto and his colleagues had previously measured the growth rates of protein crystals under simulated microgravity by using a Russian recoverable satellite and aircraft in parabolic flights. The researchers took precise measurements of the growth rate of the lysozyme crystals versus their driving force, supersaturation - the natural logarithm of the protein's concentration divided by its solubility—with measurements of the solution's refractive index distribution obtained through interferometry. This also yielded crucial information about the growth mechanism. The researchers opted to modify the supersaturation of the solution by increasing or decreasing the growth cell's temperature, which can easily be done remotely. This took place over a range of 10—40 degrees Celsius, which necessitated building a closed growth cell to withstand the stresses caused by the thermal expansion of the growth solution. The closed, cube-like growth cell was constructed out of quartz glasses with different thickness, an essential component for laser interferometry due to its high chemical and mechanical resistances with a protein seed crystal glued to the top of the sample holder. To relieve the thermal stress on the glass, the researchers attached tubes made out of an elastomer, low-moisture-permeability thermoelastic polymer. This was selected to mitigate evaporation of water in the crystal growth solution, which consisted of 30 or 35 mg/ml of lysozyme and 25 mg/ml sodium chloride in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer solution. They also employed a special spring tension system to reduce stress by keeping the gap between the glass cell and thermal control modules constant amid thermal expansion. The growth cell could also be used to fine-tune the measurements of extremely small growth or dissolution rates of insoluble minerals on the order of 0.001 nanometers per second of insoluble minerals. For example, it could measure calcium carbonate crystals, where margins of error could become massive across a geological time scale - such as predicting the dissolution of clay minerals surrounding nuclear waste stored underground for 100,000 years. While the researchers expected growth rates of the crystal solution to be slower because of the suppression of solution convection, the results instead showed an increased growth rate. This may be due to the suppression of transport speed of impurity molecules with larger diameter to the growing crystal, as analyzed the growth rate versus supersaturation relations. This will appear in forthcoming papers. Extended projects for the researchers using the same apparatus to test the growth of different crystals, such as glucose isomerase crystals, are currently in preparation.


News Article | March 15, 2016
Site: phys.org

The researchers monitored the very slow growth and dissolution rate—approximately one centimeter per second of the crystals by laser interferometry. This was the first time the technique had been used onboard the ISS to measure the growth rate of the crystals at various temperatures. To observe this, Yamazaki and his colleagues developed unique growth cells suitable for long-term projects, for about six months. "We are interested in the growth mechanisms of a space-grown protein crystal—a lysozyme crystal—as a model crystal to understand why space-grown crystals sometimes do show better quality than the Earth-grown crystals," said Tomoya Yamazaki, a PhD student in Tsukamoto's lab. Tsukamoto and his colleagues, which includes collaborators at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Japan Space Forum, Olympus Optical Corporation, detail their elegant growth method this week in Review of Scientific Instruments. The experimental process, known as NanoStep, was performed in the Japanese Experimental Module (KIBO) of the International Space Station in 2012. Tsukamoto and his colleagues had previously measured the growth rates of protein crystals under simulated microgravity by using a Russian recoverable satellite and aircraft in parabolic flights. The researchers took precise measurements of the growth rate of the lysozyme crystals versus their driving force, supersaturation - the natural logarithm of the protein's concentration divided by its solubility—with measurements of the solution's refractive index distribution obtained through interferometry. This also yielded crucial information about the growth mechanism. The researchers opted to modify the supersaturation of the solution by increasing or decreasing the growth cell's temperature, which can easily be done remotely. This took place over a range of 10—40 degrees Celsius, which necessitated building a closed growth cell to withstand the stresses caused by the thermal expansion of the growth solution. The closed, cube-like growth cell was constructed out of quartz glasses with different thickness, an essential component for laser interferometry due to its high chemical and mechanical resistances with a protein seed crystal glued to the top of the sample holder. To relieve the thermal stress on the glass, the researchers attached tubes made out of an elastomer, low-moisture-permeability thermoelastic polymer. This was selected to mitigate evaporation of water in the crystal growth solution, which consisted of 30 or 35 mg/ml of lysozyme and 25 mg/ml sodium chloride in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer solution. They also employed a special spring tension system to reduce stress by keeping the gap between the glass cell and thermal control modules constant amid thermal expansion. The growth cell could also be used to fine-tune the measurements of extremely small growth or dissolution rates of insoluble minerals on the order of 0.001 nanometers per second of insoluble minerals. For example, it could measure calcium carbonate crystals, where margins of error could become massive across a geological time scale - such as predicting the dissolution of clay minerals surrounding nuclear waste stored underground for 100,000 years. While the researchers expected growth rates of the crystal solution to be slower because of the suppression of solution convection, the results instead showed an increased growth rate. This may be due to the suppression of transport speed of impurity molecules with larger diameter to the growing crystal, as analyzed the growth rate versus supersaturation relations. This will appear in forthcoming papers. Extended projects for the researchers using the same apparatus to test the growth of different crystals, such as glucose isomerase crystals, are currently in preparation. Explore further: First-class protein crystals thanks to weightlessness on earth More information: T. Yamazaki et al. Development of compartment for studies on the growth of protein crystals in space, Review of Scientific Instruments (2016). DOI: 10.1063/1.4942961


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DALLAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kibo, the world’s leading cloud-based unified omnichannel commerce platform, and VOLT® Lighting, the leading factory-direct lighting manufacturer, today announced the launch of VOLT® Lighting’s new website powered by the Kibo eCommerce solution and implemented by Echidna. The enhanced site offers an optimal digital experience for customers, making landscape lighting easier to research and purchase for both homeowners and lighting professionals. As their second branded eCommerce site to launch with Kibo, VOLT® Lighting is utilizing the latest technology and capabilities, including: “VOLT® has had a successful eCommerce program for many years, but we were quickly outgrowing our platform and required a more advanced solution to create a unique digital experience for our customers,” says Andrew Krasner, Director of E-Commerce & Marketing, VOLT® Lighting. Designing and selecting landscape lighting systems can be a complicated process, especially for the homeowner installing their first project. Voltlighting.com needed to provide the tools and advice to simplify and streamline this process, allowing customers to find inspiration, learn techniques, quickly locate products and successfully install their lighting vision. “In order to provide this experience, we knew we needed a SaaS solution that could scale with our growing business and provide an architecture to build advanced features and tools,” continues Krasner. “Kibo well suits our growing business with its integrated and API-first structure. We have been live with the site for just over a month. Since implementing the new site, we have seen a significant uptick in conversions and have received positive response from our customers. We attribute this to an improved user experience.” With the new site, customers can now interact with the VOLT® brand beyond shopping for a product. The new design gallery allows customers to showcase completed designs and give others inspiration for their next landscape lighting project. These projects have a life beyond the website, as the site provides social actions to each project, allowing viewers to pin, tweet or share the inspiration on their favorite social sites. “Kibo is excited to bring VOLT® Lighting’s vision to life of providing streamlined lighting design and purchasing tools in an interactive and engaging brand experience,” says Jason Wallis, SVP, Strategic Architecture for Kibo. “Kibo’s extensible APIs and a great partner ecosystem are part of what allow our customers to have control over every aspect of their site and customize to fit the unique needs of their customers. We are pleased to see they are already seeing positive results and look forward to helping VOLT® grow their eCommerce initiatives.” For more information about Kibo, visit kibocommerce.com. VOLT® Lighting is the leading factory-direct manufacturer of landscape lighting products. With an aggressive product development program, the company continues to innovate, inspire, and support the outdoor lighting market. For more information, go to http://www.voltlighting.com or call 813-978-3700. Kibo empowers retailers and branded manufacturers to achieve optimal performance of B2C and B2B commerce through unified consumer experiences. With over 40 years of innovations, Kibo provides a complete omnichannel commerce platform delivered with the lowest total cost of ownership and the fastest time to market. By leveraging cloud technologies, individualized buying experiences, and true enterprise scale, Kibo enables you to reach higher peaks of sales and consumer loyalty. No matter the challenge, Kibo powers your success. For more information, visit kibocommerce.com


Lee C.,KIBO | Kim J.,Yonsei University
Journal of Network and Computer Applications | Year: 2010

It has become critical to protect biometric templates in the current biometric community. One way for doing this is using a cancelable biometric method, which transforms original biometric templates in a non-invertible way and uses those transformed templates to verify a person's identity. In this paper, we propose a new method to generate cancelable bit-strings (templates) from fingerprint minutiae. Our method is to provide a simple mean to generate cancelable templates without requiring for pre-alignment of fingerprints. The main idea is to map the minutiae into a predefined 3 dimensional array which consist of small cells and find out which cells include minutiae. To do this, we choose one of minutiae as a reference minutia and other minutiae are translated and rotated in order to map the minutiae into the cells based on the position and orientation of the reference minutia. After mapping, we set the cells in the 3D array to 1 if they include more than one minutia otherwise the cells are set to 0. A 1D bit-string is generated by sequentially visiting the cells in the 3D array. The order of the 1D bit-string is permuted according to the type of reference minutiae and user's PIN so that we can regenerate new templates when we need them. Finally, cancelable bit-strings are generated by changing the reference minutia into another minutia in turn. In the experiments, we evaluate our method using the FVC2004 database and show that the performance is better than that of a previous method. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Trademark
Kibo | Date: 2011-01-25

Dietary and nutritionally fortified food products adapted for medical use, namely, ready to use therapeutically enriched peanut and soy based food for pediatric malnutrition.


Trademark
Kibo | Date: 2015-11-10

Branded keyboards for smart phones.


Trademark
Kibo | Date: 2013-11-12

Dietary and nutritionally fortified food products adapted for medical use, namely, ready to use therapeutically enriched peanut and soy based food for pediatric malnutrition.


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

DALLAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kibo, the world’s leader in cloud-based omnichannel commerce solutions, today announced holiday shopping figures for its omnichannel retailers and branded manufacturers, showing that Kibo clients are performing above the industry average. Black Friday sales, year over year, show the industry average up 11.4%, and Kibo clients are up 14%. It’s no surprise to find that more and more consumers are using some type of mobile device to make Cyber Week purchases. Leading up to Thanksgiving, industry influencers were forecasting strong mobile use. According to Kibo’s recent consumer survey, 59% plan to purchase holiday gifts this year using their smartphone. For Kibo clients, 58% of transactions took place on mobile devices this Black Friday, compared to the industry average of 40%. Compare this year’s Black Friday mobile percentage to last year’s, and Kibo retailers and manufacturers are up 8%. Cyber Monday also made a good showing for mobile use, with Kibo clients reporting 42% of transactions occurred on mobile, compared to the industry average at 35%. Overall, Cyber Monday also saw about $3.39 billion online, setting a record for the largest day in U.S. eCommerce history. Kibo clients definitely saw that windfall, with Average Order Value coming in at $173 on Cyber Monday, compared to the industry averages of $139 and $124 for iOS and Android devices, respectively. “These figures from Kibo clients and the industry as a whole continue to show the crucial importance of mobile in consumers’ shopping journey,” says Tushar Patel, CMO, Kibo. “The distinction between online and in-store will continue to blur. Consumers using mobile for research (both at home and in store) will rise, and as retailers continue to improve their marketing and eCommerce engagement on mobile, the number of consumers completing their transactions over mobile will increase. Retailers that focus on creating a seamless, relevant experience at all touch points during a consumer’s buying journey are the ones that will rise as omnichannel champions in 2017.” To learn how Kibo can help with your commerce initiatives, click here. Kibo empowers retailers and branded manufacturers to achieve optimal performance of B2C and B2B commerce through unified consumer experiences. With over 40 years of innovations, Kibo provides a complete omnichannel commerce platform delivered with the lowest total cost of ownership and the fastest time to market. By leveraging cloud technologies, individualized buying experiences, and true enterprise scale, Kibo enables you to reach higher peaks of sales and consumer loyalty. No matter the challenge, Kibo powers your success. For more information, visit kibocommerce.com.

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