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Furusawa K.,Kibikogen Rehabilitation Center for Employment Injuries | Tokuhiro A.,Kibikogen Rehabilitation Center for Employment Injuries | Sugiyama H.,Kibikogen Rehabilitation Center for Employment Injuries | Ikeda A.,Kibikogen Rehabilitation Center for Employment Injuries | And 7 more authors.
Spinal Cord | Year: 2011

Study design: A retrospective, multicenter study.Objectives: To investigate the relationship between bowel and bladder management methods and symptomatic autonomic dysreflexia (AD) during hospitalization in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI).Setting: Twenty-eight Rosai hospitals in Japan.Methods: The study subjects were 571 patients with SCI who had been admitted to 28 Rosai hospitals between April 1997 and March 2007 for rehabilitation therapy and fulfilled the following criteria: (1) SCI at or above sixth thoracic level, (2) discharged from hospital after more than 4 months of admission for initial injury and (3) lack of pressure ulcers, deep venous thrombosis, ureteral and renal stones or heterotopic ossification throughout hospitalization to exclude possible influence of these complications on cardiovascular reflexes. The study subjects were examined for the incidence of symptomatic AD according to age, sex, ASIA Impairment Scale, injury level, bowel and bladder management techniques at discharge.Results: The Rosai Hospital registry included 3006 persons with SCI during 1997-2007, and 571 patients fulfilled the above criteria. The highest incidence of symptomatic AD was diagnosed in subjects using reflex voiding and in those using manual removal of stool. By contrast, the lowest incidence of symptomatic AD was in those on continent spontaneous voiding and continent spontaneous defecation.Conclusion: Medical staff should evaluate the presence of AD in patients with SCI at or above the T6 level under bladder and bowel management such as reflex voiding and manual removal of stool. © 2011 International Spinal Cord Society All rights reserved. Source


Maruyama T.,Okayama University | Yamamoto H.,Kibikogen Rehabilitation Center for Employment Injuries
IST 2012 - 2012 IEEE International Conference on Imaging Systems and Techniques, Proceedings | Year: 2012

The positioning skill of the radiological technologist is essential for obtaining accurate diagnostic information of an organ and for reducing X-ray exposure in radiography. We previously reported on the development of a computed tomography (CT) image-based training tool. A three-dimensional phantom was produced by using computer graphics. Positioning was performed on a PC, and the plane image corresponding to the performed positioning was produced and displayed. In this study, the algorithm which produces the plane image from the CT image data was improved in order to obtain an image quality comparable to the X-ray image obtained by the Computed radiography (CR) system. The CT value and linear attenuation coefficient were calculated from the CT image data based on the fundamental interactions between X-rays and an object. By using the linear attenuation coefficient, a plane image with the same image quality as the CR image could be produced. © 2012 IEEE. Source


Maruyama T.,Okayama University | Yamamoto H.,Kibikogen Rehabilitation Center for Employment Injuries
2011 IEEE International Conference on Imaging Systems and Techniques, IST 2011 - Proceedings | Year: 2011

An appropriate and quick positioning technique is essential for obtaining accurate diagnostic information in radiography. In this study, a computed tomography (CT) image-based training tool which can assist the students is developed and the X-ray training method using CT images for positioning in radiography is proposed. First, from the CT image data of the phantom scanned beforehand, the three-dimensional (3D) phantom using solid model is constructed and the positioning on a personal computer (PC) using the 3D phantom is performed. Next, the plane image corresponding to the displayed phantom position from the CT image data is calculated. By using our developed tool, it is expected that students could perform the positioning training without having to expose X-rays and develop the films. © 2011 IEEE. Source


Sasaki Y.,Wakayama Medical University | Furusawa K.,Kibikogen Rehabilitation Center for Employment Injuries | Tajima F.,Wakayama Medical University | Nakamura T.,Wakayama Medical University | And 5 more authors.
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine | Year: 2014

OBJECTIVE:: To investigate interleukin (IL)-6 and other inflammation markers in athletes with spinal cord injury (SCI) during a wheelchair marathon race. DESIGN:: Nonrandomized study in an actual race. SETTING:: The 28th Oita International Wheelchair Marathon Race, Japan. PARTICIPANTS:: Twenty-eight men with SCI between T7 and L2 (16 full-marathon racers, full-group; and 12 half-marathon racers, half-group). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:: Plasma IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were measured the day before, immediately after the race, and 2 hours after the race. RESULTS:: Plasma IL-6 concentrations increased by 18.4-fold and by 9.4-fold (P < 0.05) in the full- and half-groups immediately after the race (P < 0.05), respectively, but returned to baseline at 2 hours of recovery. In contrast, plasma TNF-α and hsCRP did not change throughout the race in both groups. The fold change in plasma IL-6 immediately after the race relative to the prerace was significantly higher in the full-group than the half-group (P < 0.05). In both groups, plasma IL-6 immediately after the race did not correlate with the average wheelchair speed. Interestingly, plasma IL-6 and hsCRP before the race in the full-group, but not in half-group, correlated negatively with the average wheelchair speed (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS:: The study demonstrated that half- and full-marathon wheelchair races increased plasma IL-6, but not TNF-α and hsCRP. Furthermore, the top athletes of the full-group had low plasma IL-6 and hsCRP at baseline. Wheelchair marathon competition, especially full-marathon, and daily training seem to have beneficial effects on SCI through the plasma IL-6 response. Copyright © 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Source


Umemoto Y.,Wakayama Medical University | Furusawa K.,Kibikogen Rehabilitation Center for Employment Injuries | Kouda K.,Wakayama Medical University | Sasaki Y.,Wakayama Medical University | And 3 more authors.
Spinal Cord | Year: 2011

Study design:Non-randomized study.Objectives:Previous studies indicated that at least 2-h leg exercise at more than 60% maximum oxygen consumption (VO 2 max) increased plasma interleukin (IL)-6 in able-bodied (AB) subjects. The purpose of the present study was to compare IL-6 response to arm exercise in AB subjects and persons with spinal cord injury (SCI).Setting: Wakayama Medical University in Japan.Methods:Six subjects with SCI between T6 and T10 and seven AB subjects performed 2-h arm crank ergometer exercise at 60%VO 2 max. Plasma catecholamines, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were measured before exercise, 60-min exercise, immediately and 2 h after the completion of exercise.Results:Arm exercise increased myoglobin and plasma IL-6 levels in SCI and AB (P<0.01), but there were no differences in them between the two groups throughout the study. Plasma levels creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, TNF-α and hsCRP did not change throughout the study in both groups.Conclusion:These findings suggest neither significant muscle damage nor inflammatory response during exercise. The increase in plasma IL-6 in SCI was not unexpected, confirming that moderate intensity and relatively long-arm exercise is safe and beneficial for SCI subjects with regard to IL-6 excretion, as in AB subjects. © 2011 International Spinal Cord Society. All rights reserved. Source

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