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Ignatov A.I.,Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center | Sazonov V.V.,RAS Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics
Cosmic Research | Year: 2013

The mode of monoaxial solar orientation of a designed artificial Earth satellite (AES), intended for microgravitational investigations, is studied. In this mode the normal line to the plane of satellite's solar batteries is permanently directed at the Sun, the absolute angular velocity of a satellite is virtually equal to zero. The mode is implemented by means of an electromechanical system of powered flywheels or gyrodynes. The calculation of the level of microaccelerations arising on board in such a mode, was carried out by mathematical modeling of satellite motion with respect to the center of masses under an effect of gravitational and restoring aerodynamic moments, as well as of the moment produced by the gyrosystem. Two versions of a law for controlling the characteristic angular momentum of a gyrosystem are considered. The first version provides only attenuation of satellite's perturbed motion in the vicinity of the position of rest with the required velocity. The second version restricts, in addition, the increase in the accumulated angular momentum of a gyrosystem by controlling the angle of rotation of the satellite around the normal to the light-sensitive side of the solar batteries. Both control law versions are shown to maintain the monoaxial orientation mode to a required accuracy and provide a very low level of quasistatic microaccelerations on board the satellite. © 2013 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.


Davydov A.A.,Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center
Cosmic Research | Year: 2011

A communication satellite (small spacecraft) injected into a geosynchronous orbit is considered. Flywheel engines are used to control the rotational spacecraft motion. The spacecraft after the emergency situation has passed into a state of uncontrolled rotation. In this case, no direct telemetric information about parameters of its rotational motion was accessible. As a result, the problem arose to determine the rotational satellite motion according to the available indirect information: current taken from the solar panels. Telemetric measurements of solar panel current obtained on the time interval of a few hours were simultaneously processed by the least squares method integrating the equations of rotational satellite motion. We present the results of processing 10 intervals of the measurement data allowing one to determine the real rotational spacecraft motion and to estimate the total angular momentum of flywheel engines. © 2011 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.


Shumov A.E.,Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center | Novikov L.S.,Moscow State University | Shaevich S.K.,Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center | Aleksandrov N.G.,Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center | And 14 more authors.
Advances in Space Research | Year: 2015

The Komplast materials experiment was designed by Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center together with Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University and other Russian scientific institutes, and has been carried out by Mission Control Moscow since 1998. The purpose of this experiment is to study the complex effect of the low Earth orbit environment on samples of various spacecraft materials. On November 20, 1998 the Komplast experiment began with the launch of the first International Space Station module Zarya, or Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Eight Komplast panels with samples of materials and sensors were installed on the outer surface of FGB module. Two of eight experiment panels were retrieved during Russian extravehicular activity in February 2011 after 12. years of space exposure and were subsequently returned to Earth by Space Shuttle "Discovery" on the STS-133/ULF-5 mission in March 2011.The article presents the results obtained from this unique long-duration experiment on board of the International Space Station. © 2015 COSPAR.


Kamath U.,Boeing Company | Grant G.,Boeing Company | Kuznetsov S.,Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center | Shaevich S.,Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center | Spencer V.,NASA
51st AIAA/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference | Year: 2015

The International Space Station (ISS) is a result of international collaboration in building a sophisticated laboratory of an unprecedented scale in Low Earth Orbit. After a complex assembly sequence spanning over a decade, some of the early modules launched at the beginning of the program would reach the end of their certified lives, while the newer modules were just being commissioned into operation. To maximize the return on global investments in this one-of-a-kind orbiting platform that was initially conceived for a service life until 2016, it is essential for the cutting edge research on ISS to continue as long as the station can be sustained safely in orbit. ISS Program is assessing individual modules in detail to extend the service life of the ISS to 2024, and possibly to 2028. Without life extension, Functional Cargo Block (known by its Russian acronym as FGB) and the Service Module (SM), two of the early modules on the Russian Segment, would reach the end of their certified lives in 2013 and 2015 respectively. Both FGB and SM are critical for the propulsive function of the ISS. This paper describes the approach used for the service life extension of the FGB propulsion system. Also presented is an overview of the system description along with the process adopted for developing the life test plans based on considerations of system failure modes, fault tolerance and safety provisions. Tests and analyses performed, important findings and life estimates are summarized. Based on the life extension data, FGB propulsion system, in general, is considered ready for a service life until 2028. © 2015, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA. All rights reserved.


Shaevich S.K.,Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center | Aleksandrov N.G.,Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center | Shumov A.E.,Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center | Novikov L.S.,Moscow State University | And 4 more authors.
International SAMPE Technical Conference | Year: 2014

The Komplast materials experiment was designed by the Khrunichev Space Center, together with other Russian scientific institutes, and has been carried out by Mission Control Moscow since 1998. The purpose is to study the effect of the low earth orbit (LEO) environment on exposed samples of various spacecraft materials. The Komplast experiment began with the launch of the first International Space Station (ISS) module on November 20, 1998. Two of eight experiment panels were retrieved during Russian extravehicular activity in February 2011 after 12 years of LEO exposure, and were subsequently returned to Earth by Space Shuttle "Discovery" on the STS-133/ULF-5 mission. The retrieved panels contained an experiment to detect micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts, a temperature sensor, several pieces of electrical cable, both carbon composite and adhesive-bonded samples, fluoroplastic samples, and many samples made from elastomeric materials. Our investigation is complete and a summary of the results obtained from this uniquely long-duration exposure experiment will be presented. Copyright 2014. Used by the Society of the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering with permission.

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