Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Mollafilabi A.,Islamic Azad University | Shoorideh H.,Instructor of Islamic Azad Universities | Hosseini M.,Khorassan Research Institute for Food Science and Technology | Javaheri A.,Islamic Azad University
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2010

Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) is a medicinal plant that is used in food industries, drinks, cosmetics, soap, perfume and cheese. Cumin's drugs are applied in curing disorders of digestive system. Due to its ecological, physiological and economic characteristics, cumin is suitable for cultivation in the dry and semi-dry climates. This experiment has been conducted to determine the best seed rate and amount of N fertilizer on the yield and essential oil content of cumin at the experimental farm of Islamic Azad University of Jiroft, Iran, in 2007. Variable factors were: seed rate (8, 14, 20 and 26 kg/ha) and nitrogen fertilizer (0, 50, 100 and 150 kg of nitrogen per ha.). Traits under study were: number of plants per area unit, number of umbels per plant, number of seeds per umbel, plant height, 1000 seed mass, total dry matter, harvest index (HI), seed yield, and essential oil percentage and rate. Results show that seed rate has a significant effect on number of plants per area unit, number of umbels per plant, number of seeds per umbel, plant height, seed weight and total dry matter, harvest index, seed yield at 1% level and on essential oil percent at 5% level. Also, amount of N fertilizer has significant effect on no. of umbel per plant, no. of seed per umbel, seed weight, and total dry matter, harvest index, and seed yield at 1% level. No. of umbel per plant was decreased by increasing seed rate and increased by increasing N fertilizer. Total dry matter increased by increasing seed rate and N fertilizer, but HI decreased. The highest seed yield was obtained at 150.7 plants per unit area (969.2 kg/ha) and 100 kg/ha N fertilizer (955.6 kg/ha). The highest seed yield (1016 kg/ha) and essential oil yield (3.4% equal to 36.07 kg/ha) obtained at treatment with 14 kg of seed per hectare and 50 kg of nitrogen (150.7 plant/m2) that are recommended under experimental conditions. Source


Asadi M.,University of Yazd | Dadfarnia S.,University of Yazd | Haji Shabani A.M.,University of Yazd | Abbasi B.,Khorassan Research Institute for Food Science and Technology
Food Analytical Methods | Year: 2016

A simple and highly sensitive method based on hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection has been developed for simultaneous separation, preconcentration, and determination of naproxen and nabumetone from water, wastewater, milk, and biological samples. Parameters affecting the microextraction efficiency were evaluated and optimized. Under optimum conditions (extractant (14 μL of 1-undecanol), sample pH (3.0), extraction time (20 min), stirring rate (600 rpm), temperature (45 °C), potassium chloride concentration (4.0 %) and sample volume (9 mL)), the limits of detection based on (S/N = 3) were 1.3 ng L−1 for naproxen and 2.9 ng L−1 for nabumetone. The intra- and inter-assay relative standard deviations for naproxen and nabumetone were in the ranges of 3.2–6.1 % and 6.5–9.5 %, respectively. The calibration curves were linear in concentration ranges of 4.0–300.0 ng L−1 and 9.0–300.0 ng L−1 for naproxen and nabumetone, respectively, with good coefficient of determination (r2 > 0.999). The method was successfully applied to the determination of naproxen and nabumetone in cow milk, water, wastewater, human plasma, and urine samples. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York Source


Asadi M.,University of Yazd | Asadi M.,Khorassan Research Institute for Food Science and Technology | Haji Shabani A.M.,University of Yazd | Dadfarnia S.,University of Yazd | Abbasi B.,Khorassan Research Institute for Food Science and Technology
Chinese Journal of Chromatography (Se Pu) | Year: 2015

Solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME) in combination with high performance liquid chromatography was used for separation/preconcentration and determination of carbamazepine (CBZ) in human plasma and urine samples. Parameters that affect the extraction efficiency such as the type and volume of extraction solvent, ionic strength, sodium hydroxide concentration, stirring rate, sample volume and extraction time, were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions (extraction solvent, 40 μL of 1-undecanol; sodium hydroxide concentration, 1 mol/L; temperature, 50 °C; stirring speed, 400 r/min; sample vol- ume, 8 mL; sodium chloride concentration, 3% (w/v) and extraction time, 60 min) the calibration curve was found to be linear in the mass concentration range of 0.4-700.0 μg/L. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.1 μg/L and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for six replicate extraction and determination of carbamazepine at 100 μg/L level was found to be 4.1%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of CBZ in human plasma and urine samples. Source


Asadi M.,University of Yazd | Asadi M.,Khorassan Research Institute for Food Science and Technology | Haji Shabani A.M.,University of Yazd | Dadfarnia S.,University of Yazd | Abbasi B.,Khorassan Research Institute for Food Science and Technology
Journal of Chromatography A | Year: 2015

A novel, rapid, simple and green vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction method based on solidification of floating organic drop was developed for simultaneous separation/preconcentration and determination of ultra trace amounts of naproxen and nabumetone with high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection. Some parameters influencing the extraction efficiency of analytes such as type and volume of extractant, type and concentration of surfactant, sample pH, KCl concentration, sample volume, and vortex time were investigated and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graph exhibited linearity in the range of 3.0-300.0ngL-1 for naproxen and 7.0-300.0ngL-1 for nabumetone with a good coefficient of determination (R 2 >0.999). The limits of detection were 0.9 and 2.1ngL-1. The relative standard deviations for inter- and intra-day assays were in the range of 5.8-10.1% and 3.8-6.1%, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of naproxen and nabumetone in urine, water, wastewater and milk samples and the accuracy was evaluated through recovery experiments. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Source


Asadi M.,University of Yazd | Asadi M.,Khorassan Research Institute for Food Science and Technology | Dadfarnia S.,University of Yazd | Shabani A.M.H.,University of Yazd | Abbasi B.,Khorassan Research Institute for Food Science and Technology
Journal of Separation Science | Year: 2015

A novel and simple method based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection has been developed for simultaneous preconcentration and determination of phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin in human plasma and urine samples. Factors affecting microextraction efficiency such as the type and volume of the extraction solvent, sample pH, extraction time, stirring rate, extraction temperature, ionic strength, and sample volume were optimized. Under the optimum conditions (i.e. extraction solvent, 1-undecanol (40 μL); sample pH, 8.0; temperature, 25°C; stirring rate, 500 rpm; sample volume, 7 mL; potassium chloride concentration, 5% and extraction time, 50 min), the limits of detection for phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin were 1.0, 0.1, and 0.3 μg/L, respectively. Also, the calibration curves for phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin were linear in the concentration range of 2.0-300.0, 0.3-200.0, and 1.0-200.0 μg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviations for six replicate extractions and determinations of phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin at 50 μg/L level were less than 4.6%. The method was successfully applied to determine phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin in plasma and urine samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Source

Discover hidden collaborations