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Rigobon A.V.,Queens University | Birtwhistle R.,Queens University | Khan S.,Queens University | Barber D.,Queens University | And 4 more authors.
Canadian Journal of Public Health | Year: 2015

Objectives: This research examines the feasibility of using electronic medical records within the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN) for obesity surveillance in Canada by assessing obesity trends over time and comparing BMI distribution estimates from CPCSSN to those obtained from nationally representative surveys. Methods: Data from 2003–2012 on patients 18 years and older (n = 216,075) were extracted from the CPCSSN database. Patient information included demographics (age and sex) and anthropometric measures (height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio). Standard descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample, including, as appropriate, means, proportions and medians. The BMI distribution of the CPCSSN population was compared to estimates from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) and the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) for the years: 2004, 2007–2009 and 2009–2011. Results: The estimated prevalence of obesity increased from 17.9% in 2003 to 30.8% in 2012. Obesity class I, II and III prevalence estimates from CPCSSN in 2009–2011 (18.0%, 95% CI: 17.8–18; 7.4%, 95% CI: 7.3–7.6; 4.2%, 95% CI: 4.1–4.3 respectively) were greater than those from the most recent (2009– 2011) cycle of the CHMS (16.2%, 95% CI: 14–18.7; 6.3%, 95% CI: 4.6–8.5; 3.7%, 95% CI: 2.8–4.8 respectively), however these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: The data from CPCSSN present a unique opportunity for longitudinal obesity surveillance among primary care users in Canada, and offer prevalence estimates similar to those obtained from nationally representative survey data. © 2015, Canadian Public Health Association. All rights reserved. Source


Tremblay M.S.,University of Ottawa | LeBlanc A.G.,University of Ottawa | Carson V.,Queens University | Choquette L.,Best Start Resource Center | And 15 more authors.
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism | Year: 2012

The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP), with assistance from multiple partners, stakeholders, and researchers, developed the first Canadian Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for the Early Years (aged 0-4 years). These national guidelines are in response to a call from health and health care professionals, child care providers, and fitness practitioners for guidance on sedentary behaviour in the early years. The guideline development process followed the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE) II framework. The recommendations are informed by evidence from a systematic review that examined the relationships between sedentary behaviour (predominantly screen time) and health indicators (healthy body weight, bone and skeletal health, motor skill development, psychosocial health, cognitive development, and cardio-metabolic disease risk factors) for three age groups (infants aged <1 year; toddlers aged 1-2 years; preschoolers aged 3-4 years). Evidence from the review was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The new guidelines include a preamble to provide context, followed by the specific recommendations. The final guidelines benefitted from extensive on-line consultations with input from >900 domestic and international stakeholders, end-users, and key informants. The final guidelines state: for healthy growth and development, caregivers should minimize the time infants (aged <1 year), toddlers (aged 1-2 years), and preschoolers (aged 3-4 years) spend being sedentary during waking hours. This includes prolonged sitting or being restrained (e.g., stroller, high chair) for more than 1 h at a time. For those under 2 years, screen time (e.g., TV, computer, electronic games) is not recommended. For children 2-4 years, screen time should be limited to under 1 h per day; less is better. Source


Tremblay M.S.,University of Ottawa | LeBlanc A.G.,University of Ottawa | Carson V.,Queens University | Gorber S.C.,Agence de sante publique du Canada | And 14 more authors.
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism | Year: 2012

The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP), with assistance from multiple partners, stakeholders and researchers, developed the first Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines for the Early Years (aged 0-4 years). These national guidelines were created in response to an urgent call from public health, health care, child care and fitness practitioners for healthy active living guidance for the early years. The guideline development process was informed by the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument and the evidence assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The recommendations are informed by evidence from a systematic review that examined the relationships between physical activity and health indicators (healthy body weight, bone and skeletal health, motor skill development, psychosocial health, cognitive development and cardio-metabolic disease risk factors) for three age groups (infants aged <1 year; toddlers aged 1-2 years; preschoolers aged 3-4 years). The new guidelines include a preamble to provide context, followed by the specific recommendations. The final guidelines benefitted from an extensive on-line consultation process with input from over 900 domestic and international stakeholders, end-users and key informants. The final guideline recommendations state that for healthy growth and development, infants (aged<1 year) should be physically active several times daily - particularly through interactive floor-based play. Toddlers (aged 1-2 years) and preschoolers (aged 3-4 years) should accumulate at least 180 min of physical activity at any intensity spread throughout the day, including a variety of activities in different environments, activities that develop movement skills, and progression toward at least 60 min of energetic play by 5 years of age. More daily physical activity provides greater benefits. Source


Tremblay M.S.,University of Ottawa | LeBlanc A.G.,University of Ottawa | Carson V.,Queens University | Choquette L.,Best Start Resource Center | And 15 more authors.
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism | Year: 2012

The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP), with assistance from multiple partners, stakeholders, and researchers, developed the first Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines for the Early Years (aged 0-4 years). These national guidelines were created in response to an urgent call from public health, health care, child care, and fitness practitioners for healthy active living guidance for the early years. The guideline development process was informed by the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument and the evidence assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The recommendations are informed by evidence from a systematic review that examined the relationships between physical activity and health indicators (healthy body weight, bone and skeletal health, motor skill development, psychosocial health, cognitive development, and cardio-metabolic disease risk factors) for three age groups (infants aged <1 year; toddlers aged 1-2 years; preschoolers aged 3-4 years). The new guidelines include a preamble to provide context, followed by the specific recommendations. The final guidelines benefitted from an extensive on-line consultation process with input from over 900 domestic and international stakeholders, end-users, and key informants. The final guideline recommendations state that for healthy growth and development, infants (aged <1 year) should be physically active several times daily - particularly through interactive floor based play. Toddlers (aged 1-2 years) and preschoolers (aged 3-4 years) should accumulate at least 180 min of physical activity at any intensity spread throughout the day, including a variety of activities in different environments, activities that develop movement skills, and progression toward at least 60 min of energetic play by 5 years of age. More daily physical activity provides greater benefits. Source


Chen D.,Queens University | Wong H.,Queens University | Belanger P.,Queens University | Moore K.,KFL and A Public Health | And 2 more authors.
ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information | Year: 2015

Lyme borreliosis, caused by the bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, is an emerging vector-borne infectious disease in Canada. According to the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), by the year 2020, 80% of Canadians will live in Lyme endemic areas. An understanding of the association of Ixodes scapularis, the main vector of Lyme disease, with it hosts is a fundamental component in assessing changes in the spatial distribution of human risk for Lyme disease. Through the application of Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping methods and spatial analysis techniques, this study examines the population dynamics of the black-legged Lyme tick and its primary host, the white-Tailed deer, in eastern Ontario, Canada. By developing a habitat suitability model through a GIS-based multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) analysis, the relationship of the deer habitat suitability map was generated and the results were compared with deer harvest data. Tick submission data collected from two public health units between 2006 and 2012 were used to explore the relationship between endemic ticks and deer habitat suitability in eastern Ontario. The positive correlation demonstrated between the deer habitat suitability model and deer harvest data allows us to further analyze the association between deer habitat and black-legged ticks in our study area. Our results revealed that the high tick submission number corresponds with the high suitability. These results are useful for developing management strategies that aim to prevent Lyme from becoming a threat to public health in Canada. Further studies are required to investigate how tick survival, behaviour and seasonal activity may change with projected climate change. Source

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