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Visitor Screening – one of the multiple platforms of SMS, the world’s first and most advanced Security Management Solution (SMS). Dubai, United Arab Emirates, May 02, 2017 --( SMS offers several smart applications, notably face-tracking technology, which allows the collection of information about visitors to buildings or hotels, the number of visits, times of entry and exit, in addition to vehicle tracking and the electronically stored information, where data is created, altered, communicated and stored in digital form, without the need to use paper and archiving. FirasSinno, Founder and CEO ofKeyTech, said, "Face and Vehicle tracking is no longer limited to action, thriller or detective movies. SMS offers apps that alert about suspicious movements of visitors around installations and buildings through easy-to-use intelligent algorithms that replace manual registration of visitors. It offers accurate information of visitors and no one is allowed to enter in the event of lack of information. The smart service sends alerts in case of false or incorrect information about visitor, which would increase the proportion of protection in buildings and facilities." SMS is revolutionizing the process in which installations are secured, due to its ability to integrate various types of hardware and security devices. These smart applications facilitate the monitoring of suspicious visitors and intruders and sending alerts to surveillance and control room that provides instant and detailed reports or intervene in a manner to ensure the safety of residents in buildings and facilities. The visitor tracking application ensures that information are stored accurately and correctly and also facilitates the quick and secure access to data through cloud storage anywhere and anytime. It can also identify vehicles that block parking lots in emergency cases and provide control rooms with the previously stored information. The smart security solution can also help motorists who forgot where they parked their cars to find them. All these smart security solutions have been developed by KeyTech. Available in multiple languages, SMS provides full accountability and instant reporting, enabling institutions to assess security status of installations’ at any given time through a single control system. The KeyTech CEO added that SMS can be fully optimized and programed to meet all security requirements of different types of facilities, where each building has its own privacy and requirements. The state-of-the-art SMS program can be used in commercial and residential buildings, shopping malls, hospitals and educational institutions, as well as anywhere that needs security solutions. The state-of-the-art solution enables amalgamation of various advanced security peripheral devices including biometric scanners, card readers, digital signature pads and ID card readers, into a desktop and internet database. KeyTech recently signed several similar agreements with leading companies in the Middle East and the UAE, including Wise Group, Intercontinental Hotels and Landmark Group, under which it provided them with smart security management solutions that help save time and effort as well as speed and perfection. Based in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Jordan and the UAE, KeyTech Group provides advanced security solutions to corporates across the region, including security management solutions, surveillance cameras, biometric readers, in addition to offering training courses on security solutions. Dubai, United Arab Emirates, May 02, 2017 --( PR.com )-- KeyTech Security Solutions, a Dubai-based leading provider of security management solutions, has launched a biometric facial and vehicle tracking service as part of its most powerful and sophisticated Security Management Solution (SMS) program, the world’s first and the most advanced security management solution.SMS offers several smart applications, notably face-tracking technology, which allows the collection of information about visitors to buildings or hotels, the number of visits, times of entry and exit, in addition to vehicle tracking and the electronically stored information, where data is created, altered, communicated and stored in digital form, without the need to use paper and archiving.FirasSinno, Founder and CEO ofKeyTech, said, "Face and Vehicle tracking is no longer limited to action, thriller or detective movies. SMS offers apps that alert about suspicious movements of visitors around installations and buildings through easy-to-use intelligent algorithms that replace manual registration of visitors. It offers accurate information of visitors and no one is allowed to enter in the event of lack of information. The smart service sends alerts in case of false or incorrect information about visitor, which would increase the proportion of protection in buildings and facilities."SMS is revolutionizing the process in which installations are secured, due to its ability to integrate various types of hardware and security devices. These smart applications facilitate the monitoring of suspicious visitors and intruders and sending alerts to surveillance and control room that provides instant and detailed reports or intervene in a manner to ensure the safety of residents in buildings and facilities.The visitor tracking application ensures that information are stored accurately and correctly and also facilitates the quick and secure access to data through cloud storage anywhere and anytime.It can also identify vehicles that block parking lots in emergency cases and provide control rooms with the previously stored information. The smart security solution can also help motorists who forgot where they parked their cars to find them.All these smart security solutions have been developed by KeyTech. Available in multiple languages, SMS provides full accountability and instant reporting, enabling institutions to assess security status of installations’ at any given time through a single control system.The KeyTech CEO added that SMS can be fully optimized and programed to meet all security requirements of different types of facilities, where each building has its own privacy and requirements. The state-of-the-art SMS program can be used in commercial and residential buildings, shopping malls, hospitals and educational institutions, as well as anywhere that needs security solutions.The state-of-the-art solution enables amalgamation of various advanced security peripheral devices including biometric scanners, card readers, digital signature pads and ID card readers, into a desktop and internet database.KeyTech recently signed several similar agreements with leading companies in the Middle East and the UAE, including Wise Group, Intercontinental Hotels and Landmark Group, under which it provided them with smart security management solutions that help save time and effort as well as speed and perfection.Based in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Jordan and the UAE, KeyTech Group provides advanced security solutions to corporates across the region, including security management solutions, surveillance cameras, biometric readers, in addition to offering training courses on security solutions. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from KeyTech Security Solution


In a small phase I and II clinical trial, Johns Hopkins researchers and colleagues elsewhere found that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet was a safe and effective treatment option for the majority of adults experiencing a relatively rare, often fatal and always severe form of epilepsy marked by prolonged seizures that require medically induced comas to prevent them from further damaging the body and the brain. In a report on the trials, published online Feb. 8 in Neurology, the investigators conclude that the diet is a "feasible" option for people with so-called super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE), the most severe seizure classification, in which up to an estimated 60 percent of patients die once they develop this type of seizure. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 5 million people in the U.S. have a seizure disorder. More than 150,000 people in the U.S. each year will develop refractory status epilepticus and, according to published studies, about half of those will develop super-refractory seizures. "From our past research, we know the ketogenic diet is effective in approximately one-third of adults with epilepsy who are resistant to traditional anti-seizure drugs," says Mackenzie C. Cervenka, M.D., associate professor of neurology and director of the Adult Epilepsy Diet Center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "Because there isn't a standard treatment for super-refractory status epilepticus and those patients diagnosed have such a high death and disability rate, we decided we had to try something different to treat them and test its safety and value." For the study, the research team recruited 15 patients hospitalized with super-refractory status epilepticus at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Mayo Clinic, the Queen's Medical Center in Honolulu and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. The patients ranged in age from 18 to 82. Five were men, and six had a previous history of some form of epilepsy prior to developing super-refractory seizures. Super-refractory status epilepticus can occur in people who already have a seizure disorder or in those without such a history. Nine participants were white, four were African-American, one was Asian and one was native Hawaiian. In general, after a patient has experienced 24 hours in a seizure and there have been multiple failed attempts to stop it with drugs, physicians will use general anesthetics to put a patient in a coma to protect the muscles, kidneys and brain from damage -- common side effects of prolonged seizure episodes. After 24 hours, the patient is awakened to see if the seizures return. If so, then the seizures are considered super-refractory. Then, the physician will put the patient back in a coma and continue to try other medications, but there is no standard treatment protocol at this point. Patients in the research population had taken an average of eight anti-seizure medications before physicians introduced a commercially prepared ketogenic diet. The diet contained a nutrient liquid composed of four parts fat to one part carbohydrates and protein combined in grams. Each patient received the diet through a feeding tube over 72 hours, with their calorie needs calculated based on weight, while in a medically induced coma. After 72 hours on the diet, the physicians tapered off their anesthesia to see if the seizures had stopped. If the seizures did not return at this point, patients continued with the diet for several days until they could eat on their own, at which time they were switched to a modified Atkins diet, which is high in fat and low in carbohydrates as well. If a patient's seizures continued, he or she was kept on the feeding tube ketogenic diet, but additional anti-seizure medications were given as well. The rationale for the high-fat ketogenic diet, popularized by neurologists at Johns Hopkins over the past 30 years, is based on the fact that it accelerates the body's metabolism of fats, similar to fasting, which appears to alter the excitability of nerve cells in the brain. When most of a person's calories or energy come from fat, the body accumulates metabolic breakdown products known as ketone bodies. Ketones are easily measured in the blood and urine. After two days, all patients had detectible levels of ketones, showing that they were metabolizing fat -- rather than carbohydrates or proteins -- for cellular energy. One patient among the 15 was taken off the diet when family members requested to withdraw care and died. In 11 of the remaining 14, or 79 percent, who completed the full course of the ketogenic diet, super-refractory seizures stopped, with eight recovering within a week after the episode started. Five patients in the study died, including the one taken off the diet when the family requested withdrawal of care. Three of those who died weren't helped by the ketogenic diet, and the diet was stopped when they developed dangerous acid levels despite treatment with bicarbonate, the standard and best therapy for acidosis in this situation. The fifth patient improved with the ketogenic diet while hospitalized, but the diet was discontinued during rehabilitation in another facility. The super-refractory status epilepticus recurred and was treated anew with the ketogenic diet, but the patient succumbed to a heart attack not likely related to the diet, according to an independent panel. Ten of the 15 patients experienced adverse effects of the diet, which included constipation, weight loss, low blood sugar, high cholesterol in the blood and low sodium levels in the blood. Altogether, six of the 11 patients who completed the ketogenic diet course in the hospital eventually switched to a modified Atkins diet, which is easier to follow than the ketogenic diet. The ketogenic diet requires precise weighing and measurements of food and can be hard to maintain, says Cervenka. The modified Atkins diet limits patients to 20 grams of carbohydrates per day (not including fiber) and allows liberal amounts of fat. At the six-month follow-up for these 11 patients, four were still on the modified Atkins diet. Two patients who remained seizure-free tapered off the diet because they found it difficult to follow. Two patients reported their seizures reduced by more than 50 percent, two had ongoing seizures, one had experienced a single seizure and none experienced return of status epilepticus. The researchers caution that much further research will be need to support the idea that the ketogenic diet should be widely used in those with this severe form of epilepsy. "We can only state that it appears to work in some patients to halt status epilepticus and reduces the frequency of their seizures," says Cervenka. The researchers plan to carry out phase III randomized controlled clinical trials to determine the actual rate of effectiveness by comparing those treated with the ketogenic diet to a group tube-fed a normal, nonketogenic diet. "What we can say is that the ketogenic diet is promising for at least a subset of patients. Any safe means we have of getting patients off of anesthesia and out of a coma quickly will be welcome," says Cervenka. Additional authors on the study include Bobbie Henry-Barron, Eric Kossoff, Adam Hartman, John Probasco, David Benavides, Arun Venkatesan, Batya Radzik, Marie Depew, Filissa Caserta, Paul Nyquist, Romergryko Geocadin and Peter Kaplin of Johns Hopkins Medicine; Sara Hocker of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota; Matthew Koenig, Eliza Hagen, Denise Dittrich and Tracy Stern of the Queen's Medical Center in Honolulu; and Barak Bar of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. The study was funded by philanthropic gifts from Chris Garrod, Dawn Griffiths and the Carson Harris Foundation. Cervenka receives grants from Nutricia and Vitaflo, and honoraria from the Neurology Center and LivaNova. Hocker consults for SAGE Therapeutics. Henry-Barron receives grants from Nutricia and Vitaflo. Kossoff received a grant from Nutricia and consults for Atkins Nutritionals Inc. Hartman receives royalties from Wiley, LWW and Taylor & Francis, and has a patent pending for a new therapeutic molecule for seizure treatment. Benavides receives funding from Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals. Geocadin receives a grants from KeyTech Inc.


Kermani B.,KeyTech | Chevrot T.,Total S.A.
NACE - International Corrosion Conference Series | Year: 2014

Pipeline integrity is key to maintaining operational success, safety and security and minimizing harm to the environment. Corrosion is a dominant contributory factor to failures, leaks and integrity threats in pipelines. Therefore, its optimum control within an integrity management framework is paramount for the cost effective design of facilities and ensuring continued, uninterrupted and safe operations within the expected design life. This paper summarizes major elements of a recent recommended practice (RP) on Pipeline Corrosion Management (PCM) published by the European Federation of Corrosion (EFC). The RP goes into details on a methodical approach to carrying out PCM. It is a step change in the approach, methodology and necessary elements in ensuring integrity of pipelines in the oil and gas industry enabling improved safety, security and minimizing the impact on the environment. © 2014 by NACE International.


Vivacqua V.,Qatar University | Vivacqua V.,University of Leeds | Ghadiri M.,University of Leeds | Abdullah A.M.,Qatar University | And 5 more authors.
Chemical Engineering Research and Design | Year: 2016

A linear dynamic model of water droplet deformation in the presence of an electric field has been developed. Analytical solutions of the differential equation of motion are provided with different waveforms as forcing terms, namely in the case of half-sinusoidal, square and sawtooth waves. The main dimensionless groups are identified as a result of this analysis. The predictions of the model are compared with some data of droplet deformation available in the literature. The calculations based on this model show that the waveform affects the response of the droplet to the electric field stimulus. Resonance is possible only when the droplets are sufficiently large (i.e. for Ohnesorge number less than 1). The oscillation amplitude decreases rapidly with the electric field frequency. A qualitative comparison with some experiments of droplet-interface coalescence available in the literature has also been addressed, suggesting a correlation between the formation of secondary droplets and the amplitude of oscillation of the mother droplet. The outcomes of this analysis can be useful for the selection of the best operating conditions to improve the electrocoalescence process efficiency, as they can provide guidelines to the choice of the most suitable electric field parameters. © 2016 Institution of Chemical Engineers


Vivacqua V.,Qatar University | Ghadiri M.,University of Leeds | Abdullah A.M.,Qatar University | Hassanpour A.,University of Leeds | And 4 more authors.
Chemical Engineering Research and Design | Year: 2016

The coalescence of a water drop in a dieletric oil phase at a water layer interface in the presence of an electric field is simulated by solving the Navier–Stokes and charge conservation equations with the finite element method. The proprietary software Comsol Multiphysics is used for this purpose. The interface between the oil and water phases is tracked by implementing a Level Set approach. The sensitivity of the model with respect to some input parameters are reported. In particular, the calculations are sensitive to the size of the computational grid elements, interface thickness and re-initialization parameter. The ratio between the volume of secondary droplets and the initial drop volume is calculated as a function of the initial drop size and compared with experiments available in the literature. A good quantitative agreement can be obtained if the parameters are suitably tuned. The model also predicts a strong role played by the water phase conductivity in the formation of progeny droplets. © 2016 Institution of Chemical Engineers


Mhatre S.,Qatar University | Vivacqua V.,Qatar University | Ghadiri M.,University of Leeds | Abdullah A.M.,Qatar University | And 5 more authors.
Chemical Engineering Research and Design | Year: 2015

The current understanding and developments in the electrostatic phase separation are reviewed. The literature covers predominantly two immiscible and inter-dispersed liquids following the last review on the topic some 15 years. Electrocoalescence kinetics and governing parameters, such as the applied field, liquid properties, drop shape and flow, are considered. The unfavorable effects, such as chain formation and partial coalescence, are discussed in detail. Moreover, the prospects of microfluidics platforms, non-uniform fields, coalescence on the dielectric surfaces to enhance the electrocoalescence rate are also considered. In addition to the electrocoalescence in water-in-oil emulsions the research in oil-in-oil coalescence is also discussed. Finally the studies in electrocoalescer development and commercial devices are also surveyed.The analysis of the literature reveals that the use of pulsed DC and AC electric fields is preferred over constant DC fields for efficient coalescence; but the selection of the optimum field frequency a priori is still not possible and requires further research. Some recent studies have helped to clarify important aspects of the process such as partial coalescence and drop-drop non-coalescence. On the other hand, some key phenomena such as thin film breakup and chain formation are still unclear. Some designs of inline electrocoalescers have recently been proposed; however with limited success: the inadequate knowledge of the underlying physics still prevents this technology from leaving the realm of empiricism and fully developing in one based on rigorous scientific methodology. © 2015 The Authors.


Kermani B.,KeyTech | Daguerre F.,Tenaris Group
NACE - International Corrosion Conference Series | Year: 2010

With the growing environmental constraints, global warming and public awareness, there is an increasing incentive to reduce carbon emissions. One approach to achieving this is through CO 2 capture and storage (CCS). Once captured and compressed, CO 2 must be transported to a long term storage site. In principle, transmission may be accomplished by pipelines, tankers, trains, trucks, compressed gas cylinders, as CO 2 hydrate, or as solid dry ice. However, only pipeline and tanker transmission are reasonable options for the large quantities of CO 2 associated with power stations, other industry activities or hydrocarbon production. This paper combines current status of materials and corrosion options for CO 2 transmission, outlining any technology gaps that may exist. In addition, a simple guideline is presented enabling materials optimization for CO 2 transmission in CCS. © 2010 by NACE International.


Kermani B.,KeyTech. | Daguerre F.,Tenaris Group
NACE - International Corrosion Conference Series | Year: 2010

With the growing environmental constraints, global warming and public awareness, there is an increasing incentive to reduce carbon emissions. One approach to achieving this is through CO 2 capture and storage (CCS). Once captured and compressed, CO 2 must be transported to a long term storage site. In principle, transmission may be accomplished by pipelines, tankers, trains, trucks, compressed gas cylinders, as CO 2 hydrate, or as solid dry ice. However, only pipeline and tanker transmission are reasonable options for the large quantities of CO 2 associated with power stations, other industry activities or hydrocarbon production. This paper combines current status of materials and corrosion options for CO 2 transmission, outlining any technology gaps that may exist. In addition, a simple guideline is presented enabling materials optimization for CO 2 transmission in CCS. ©2010 by NACE International.


Kermani B.,KeyTech
NACE - International Corrosion Conference Series | Year: 2014

The majority of internal corrosion damages in hydrocarbon production systems are associated with sweet corrosion and the limited performance of carbon and low alloy steels (C-steels) to this type of corrosion threat. Whilst past efforts to studying CO2 corrosion have largely been in relation to addressing system chemistry/operating conditions, less attention has been directed at metallurgical parameters. This paper focuses on both alloy chemistry and microstructure in addressing CO2 corrosion of C-steels. In this, a systematic analysis of corrosion damages combining operational and experimental data has been carried out in an attempt to elucidate influential steel properties that affect corrosion behavior. Steel performance has been characterized through determination of uncombined/free Cr and V and the influence of other alloying elements together with microstructural features. The results are exceptional and unique, pointing towards key variables influencing corrosion behavior of C-steels in CO2-containing fluids. © 2014 by NACE International.


Kermani B.,KeyTech
Materials Performance | Year: 2014

NACE has been instrumental in encouraging positive impacts of corrosion by outlining losses, costs, failures, leaks, and degradation. There have been exceptional innovations in developing new generations of corrosion-resistant alloys, corrosion inhibitors, and coating systems with outstanding performances. Their discipline enables a more efficient use of resources, thus reducing the impact on climate change; and is also instrumental in the development and implementation of carbon capture, transportation, and storage technologies that can help reverse the effect of carbon dioxide emissions. By working together with city planners and other engineering disciplines, corrosion mitigation can give rise to new, more sustainable ways of urban living. With increasing pressure on water and food resources, NACE professionals have a key role in ensuring that clean water is available to users and not lost to leaks or failures.

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