BALTIMORE, MD, United States

Key Technologies, Inc.

www.keytechinc.com
BALTIMORE, MD, United States
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Patent
Key Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2011-10-13

The present invention relates to novel materials particularly useful for ophthalmic applications and methods for making and using the same. More particularly, the present invention relates to relatively soft, optically transparent, foldable, high refractive index Materials particularly suited for use in the production of intraocular lenses, contact lenses, and other ocular implants and to methods for manufacturing and using the same.


Patent
Key Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2012-03-05

The present invention relates to novel methods and materials particularly useful for ophthalmic applications and to methods for making and using the same. More particularly, the present invention relates to relatively soft, optically transparent, foldable, high refractive index materials particularly suited for use in the production of intraocular lenses, contact lenses, and other ocular implants and to methods for manufacturing and implanting IOLs made therefrom.


Patent
Key Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2013-03-22

The present invention relates to novel materials particularly useful for ophthalmic applications and methods for making and using the same. More particularly, the present invention relates to relatively soft, optically transparent, foldable, high refractive index materials particularly suited for use in the production of intraocular lenses, contact lenses, and other ocular implants and to methods for manufacturing and using the same.


This invention relates to the fields of polymer chemistry, materials science and ophthalmology. More particularly it relates to optical components and method(s) of preparing same from hydrophobic acrylic (HA) monomer(s) that exhibit reduced or eliminated glistenings when implanted in a patients eye. The method of this invention uses a mixture of one or more low temperature initiators (LTI) combined with one or more high temperature initiators (HTI), to polymerize one or more HA monomers to produce an optical HA polymer which, when used to manufacture an optical component and implanted as with an intraocular lens (IOL), exhibit reduced glistenings to the patient.


Patent
Key Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2014-10-17

Novel methods and materials particularly useful for ophthalmic applications and to methods for making and using the same are disclosed herein. More particularly, relatively soft, optically transparent, foldable, high refractive index materials particularly suited for use in the production of intraocular lenses, contact lenses, and other ocular implants and to methods for manufacturing and implanting IOLs made therefrom are disclosed.


Patent
Key Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2015-04-13

The present invention relates to novel materials particularly useful for ophthalmic applications and methods for making and using the same. More particularly, the present invention relates to relatively soft, optically transparent, foldable, high refractive index materials particularly suited for use in the production of intraocular lenses, contact lenses, and other ocular implants and to methods for manufacturing and using the same.


Patent
Key Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2010-06-25

The present invention relates to novel materials particularly useful for ophthalmic applications and methods for making and using the same. More particularly, the present invention relates to relatively soft, optically transparent, foldable, high refractive index materials particularly suited for use in the production of intraocular lenses, contact lenses, and other ocular implants and to methods for manufacturing and using the same.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.87M | Year: 2015

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant This project will result in the creation of a clinical grade product called the CoolStat that will be able to quickly and safely cool the brain and body after cardiac arrest The CoolStat is designed to be initiated by EMS personnel to start early cooling post arrest which has been shown to improve survival rates and neurological outcomes As part of this overall project we will create the clinical grade CoolStat product for use in human trial obtain FDA approval to use the product in a pilot cardiac arrest study via an IDE and complete the pilot study in cardiac arrest victims to measure safety and cooling efficacy Current techniques to provide early cooling to patients are not effective relying on some form of active cooling whether by ice packs cold saline or evaporative fluids Our approach is novel in that we are harnessing a physiologic process that triggers the body to cool itself There are no active cooling systems or evaporative chemicals Our cooling method uses only dry ambient air that we blow into the nasal track and then extract the moisturized air from the mouth This sets up an evaporating cooling heat exchange which effectively pulls energy and heat out of the body cooling the brain at a rate of about C in minutes This project will be an extension of previous grant work we have completed including pre clinical and feasibility testing in humans We will complete this proposed project in three sequential stages In Year we will transition from a bench top prototype of the product to making about clinical grade devices We will also obtain an IDE from the FDA to run the human study In Year we will implement the human study by working with our strategic partner Zoll Medical a leading commercial company in the field of patient temperature management Zoll has agreed to partner with us to allow them to better assess the benefit of our cooling technology Tentatively the human study will be conducted at sites that have been pre approved by Zoll In Year we will finish the human study analyze and publish the results and hopefully transition into a pivotal study with Zoll This work will validate a new method for inducing hypothermia that can be easily deployed during treatment of out of hospital cardiac arrest as well as other ischemic injuries to the brain and the heart It will prove the clinical value of early cooling and hopefully become a standard of care Ultimately we plan to leverage this grant program into the creation of a family of cooling products that can be used for cardiac arrest ST elevated myocardial infarction stroke and other potential indications PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the developed world This project will result in the creation of a clinical grade product called the CoolStat tha will be able to quickly and safely cool patients after cardiac arrest Cooling patients early has been shown to improve chances of survival and reduce brain damage Once the clinical grade CoolStat is ready we will use it to complete an initial human study in cardiac arrest victims to show safety and cooling


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 161.05K | Year: 2012

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): This project will introduce a completely new approach for inducing mild hypothermia and cerebral cooling. Therapeutic Hypothermia (TH) has previously been shown to improve patient survival and neurological outcomes, butit has only been adopted by a small fraction of medical healthcare systems. The lack of adoption has, in part, been due to poor implementation methods that are either impractical, ineffective, or they interfere with EMS resuscitation efforts. This projectwill test and demonstrate a novel trans-nasal evaporative cooling device that solves these issues, which will facilitate a broader level of adoption and use of the therapy. Current induction techniques rely on some form of active cooling, whether by icepacks, cold saline or evaporative fluids. Our approach is novel in that we are harnessing a physiologic process that triggers the body to cool itself. There are no active cooling systems or evaporative chemicals. Our cooling method uses only dry, ambient air. The upper respiratory tract is very efficient at conditioning inspired air (prior to arrival at the luns), i.e., it can humidify dry air to full saturation very quickly. This humidifying process requires energy to convert water in the body to a vapor that is then mixed with the incoming dry air. Our cooling approach uses this physiological response to achieve the desired hypothermia. We force dry air through the nasal track and then extract the moisturized air, which effectively pulls energy and heat out of the body. This project will be completed in several sequential stages. In Phase I, we will build on our preliminary studies with pigs to optimize the cooling process variables, looking at a range of air flows and temperature. We will also develop a simple prototype device to deliver the therapy and to confirm the safety of the method. In Phase II, we will develop a clinical-grade device and perform additional pig studies to confirm that the induced hypothermia is safe, effective and is associated withimproved outcome of resuscitation and short term neurologic function. We will end Phase II with a small human study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of the process in humans. This work will validate a new method for inducing hypothermia that can be easily deployed during treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, as well as other ischemic injuries to the brain and the heart. We plan to continue our development program into larger clinical trials (post Phase II) to assess clinical benefits associated with introducing this therapy early after ROSC. Ultimately, we plan to leverage this grant program into the creation of a new product and therapy model that will have significant clinical and economic value. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the developed world. This project will develop and test a new device that will be able to quickly and safely cool the brain and body after a heart attack, which will be used by emergency medical services (EMS)personnel. This type of cooling has been shown to dramatically improve rates of survival and reduce brain damage.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.25M | Year: 2011

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): This project will develop new surgical tools and procedures to facilitate a minimally invasive repair for uterine or vaginal vault prolapsed, a disorder of the female pelvic floor. The current gold standard operation for this disorder is the sacral colpopexy, primarily performed via laparotomy in which a relatively large abdominal incision is made to access the area in a manner similar to that performed for a cesarean section or abdominal hysterectomy. This procedure hasa high success rate but entails the pain and morbidity associated with the large abdominal incision. A small but increasing number of surgeons are now performing sacral colpopexy via laparoscopy or robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery, including a novel technique that utilizes a single 2-3 cm umbilical incision. Although feasible, the current laparoscopic equipment has deficiencies that make this procedure difficult, limiting its practice to those with advanced laparoscopic skills who are willing to undergoa steep learning curve. Even when performed by experienced surgeons, sacral colpopexy performed laparoscopically or robotically requires longer operative times and increased operating room (OR) personnel when compared to open sacral colpopexy. This project will transform this gold standard procedure into one that is primarily performed via laparoscopy or robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery, including the single-incision / single-port approach. This will reduce hospital stays, potentially decrease blood loss and operative morbidity, reduce post- operative pain, and support an earlier return to normal activities. It will also allow the procedure to be rendered more efficiently, with a shorter learning curve and a reduction in OR personnel and costs. Beyond the sacral colpopexy, the equipment and tooling being proposed will provide a platform for a range of female pelvic surgery procedures, most notably, the laparoscopic or laparoscopically assisted hysterectomy. This project will be completed in several sequential stages. First, the preliminary surgical tools and procedures will be finalized (based on designs and feasibility testing completed in Phase I). Next, the tools and procedures will be tested in a cadaver model, which is intended to prove the safety andperformance of the tools and procedures. The project will conclude with human subject testing that will demonstrate safety and performance in human subjects, which will include post-operative follow up. An outside panel of medical peers will be formed tofollow the project, to provide feedback on the safety and efficiency of the approach and tooling and to suggest improvements. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Each year, approximately 200,000 women undergo inpatient procedures related to pelvic organ prolapsed in the United States and it is expected that this number will rise with the aging population. A current surgical repair procedure (known as sacral colpopexy ) is typically performed via laparotomy in which a relatively large abdominal incision is madeto access the pelvic area (similar to that performed for a cesarean section or abdominal hysterectomy). This project will develop an improved laparoscopic approach that will use minimally invasive techniques to perform this procedure using very small patient incisions. This is expected to decrease operative morbidity, reduce patient pain and recovery time, and shorten hospital stays and costs.

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