Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Yu L.,Sun Yat Sen University | Yu L.,Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control SYSU | Liao Q.,Ningbo University | Chen X.,Sun Yat Sen University | And 13 more authors.
Parasitology Research | Year: 2014

Increasing evidence shows that microRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of regulatory molecules involved in many physiological processes, including the inflammation in central nervous system (CNS) and neurological disorders. Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) is the major cause of human infectious eosinophilic meningitis and can induce CNS injury. In the present study, we investigated the expression of miRNAs involved in neuronal functions such as miR-132-3p/212-3p, and miR-146a-5p, inflammation-related miRNA, in the modulation of inflammation of CNS of mice and rats induced by A. cantonensis. The functions of differentially expressed miRNAs were analyzed through bioinformatics methods, and the expression of chosen target genes were investigated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that miR-146a-5p upregulated in the brain of rats after 21 days; A. cantonensis infection and the expression of miR-132-3p and miR-146a-5p upregulated in the brain of mice model infected by A. cantonensis. The expression of the target genes of mmu-miR-146a-5p such as Irak1 and Traf6 downregulated in 14 days and 21 days after A. cantonensis infection. Our results supply more information about the involvement of the miRNAs in the regulation of inflammation of CNS induced by A. cantonensis. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Feng Y.,Sun Yat Sen University | Zeng X.,Sun Yat Sen University | Zeng X.,Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control SYSU | Li W.-H.,Sun Yat Sen University | And 9 more authors.
Parasites and Vectors | Year: 2014

Background: One of the most common causes of meningitis in South East Asia is angiostrongyliasis or infection by the parasitic nematode Angiostrongyliasis cantonensis. Although this nematode usually resides in the pulmonary arteries of rats, its incidental occurence in other hosts such as humans can cause optic neuritis and lead to serious vision sequelae. Nevertheless, there are currently no systematic studies conducted in this area. Methods. In order to study the pathogenesis of optic neuritis, mice were tried as a new animal model to study and challenge with A. cantonensis on 7d, 14d and 21d, respectively. Electroretinogram (ERG), visual evoked potential (VEP), ophthalmoscopy and histology were examined on day 7d, 14d and 21d and tribendimidine (TBD) was later used to treat optic neuritis on day 14d for a week to evaluate its therapeutic effects. Results: Infection of A. cantonensis caused obvious inflammatory cell infiltration in the retina and optic nerve adventitia in day 14d and 21d followed by optic nerve fiber demyelination and retinal ganglion swelling at day 21d in the challenged mice. Prolonged VEP latency and decreased ERG amplitude were also observed on day 21. After treatment of TBD in the infected mice, retinal and optic nerve inflammation were alleviated, but VEP latency and ERG amplitude did not improve on day 21d and 28d. Conclusions: The current study provides evidence that A. cantonensis can cause optic neuritis along with optic nerve demyelination and retinal ganglion cell damage in a mouse model. TBD alone treatment can improve the symptoms of optic neuritis, but does not aid in vision recovery, suggesting that both neuroprotective agents and Dexamethasone should be administered, along with treatment for the infection, to protect the optic nerve and ganglion cells. Furthermore, as the symptoms of optic neuritis caused by A. cantonensis in mice are similar to the optic neuritis in multiple sclerosis (MS) human patients, we suggest that the BALB/c mouse model provided in this study may be useful to explore therapies of optic neuritis in MS patients. © 2014 Feng et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Feng Y.,Sun Yat Sen University | Zeng X.,Sun Yat Sen University | Zeng X.,Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control SYSU | Li W.-H.,Sun Yat Sen University | And 7 more authors.
Parasitology Research | Year: 2014

Human Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) is a food-borne parasitic disease and can cause optic neuritis. Increasing clinical angiostrongyliasis cases with optic neuritis have been reported, but the pathogenesis has not been fully understood until now. Here, we applied rats with A. cantonensis infection as an animal model to study the pathogenesis of optic neuritis caused by the infection. We observed that the optic disk of experimental rats appeared hyperemic, the retina vein became thick, and the visual evoked potential (VEP) latency was prolonged. There were obvious inflammatory cell infiltration in the retina and optic nerve adventitia followed with obvious optic nerve fiber demyelination and retina ganglion swelling. We also evaluated the effect of dexamethasone combined with albendazole on optic neuritis of rats infected with A. cantonensis. The results showed it had no obvious effect to prevent progressive visual deterioration for optic neuritis caused by A. cantonensis. The studies provided evidence that the pathogenesis of optic neuritis in infected rats was correlated to optic nerve demyelination and ganglion cell damage caused by optic nerve inflammation, and the common therapy to this disease was not so effective. Based on the above results, it may be necessary to combine neuroprotective agents with common therapy to treat and protect optic nerve and ganglion cells from their secondary injury. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Feng F.,Sun Yat Sen University | Feng F.,Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control SYSU | Feng Y.,Sun Yat Sen University | Liu Z.,Sun Yat Sen University | And 7 more authors.
Parasites and Vectors | Year: 2015

Background: Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) infection can lead to optic neuritis, retinal inflammation, damage to ganglion cells, demyelination of optic nerve and visual impairment. Combined therapy of albendazole and dexamethasone is a common treatment for the disease in the clinic, but it plays no role in vision recovery. Therefore, it has been necessary to explore alternative therapies to treat this disease. Previous studies reported the neuro-productive effects of two constituents of Danshen (a Chinese herb)-tanshinone II-A (TSII-A) and cryptotanshinone (CPT), and this study aims to evaluate the impacts of TSII-A or CPT combined with albendazole on optic neuritis caused by A. cantonensis infection in a murine model. Methods: To assess the effects of TSII-A or CPT combined with albendazole on optic neuritis due to the infection, mice were divided into six groups, including the normal control group, infection group and four treatment groups (albendazole group, albendazole combined with dexamethasone group, albendazole combined with CPT group and albendazole combined with TSII-A group). The infection group and treatment groups were infected with A. cantonensisand the treatment groups received interventions from 14 dpi (days post infection), respectively. At 21 dpi, the visual acuity of mice in each group was examined by visual evoked potential (VEP). The pathologic alteration of the retina and optic nerve were observed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). Results: Infection of A. cantonensis caused prolonged VEP latency, obvious inflammatory cell infiltration in the retina, damaged retinal ganglions and retinal swelling, followed by optic nerve fibre demyelination and a decreasing number of axons at 21 dpi. In treatment groups, albendazole could not alleviate the above symptoms; albendazole combined with dexamethasone lessened the inflammation of the retina, but was futile for the other changes; however, albendazole combined with CPT and albendazole combined with TSII-A showed obvious effects on the recovery of prolonged VEP latency, destruction and reduction of ganglion cells, optic nerve demyelination and axon loss. Compared with albendazole-CPT compound, albendazole combined with TSII-A was more effective. Conclusions: The current study demonstrates that albendazole combined with TSII-A plays a more effective role in treating optic neuritis caused by A. cantonensis in mice than with dexamethasone, as applied in conventional treatment, indicating that albendazole combined with TSII-A might be an alternate therapy for this parasitic disease in the clinic. © 2015 Feng et al. Source

Discover hidden collaborations