Time filter

Source Type

Zhu F.,Xi'an Jiaotong University | Zhu F.,Key Laboratory of the Education Ministry for Environment and Genes Related to Diseases | Yan C.-x.,Xi'an Jiaotong University | Yan C.-x.,Key Laboratory of the Education Ministry for Environment and Genes Related to Diseases | And 13 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Dopamine D1 receptor (DRD1) modulates opioid reinforcement, reward, and opioid-induced neuroadaptation. We propose that DRD1 polymorphism affects susceptibility to opioid dependence (OD), the efficiency of transition to OD, and opioid-induced pleasure response. We analyzed potential association between seven DRD1 polymorphisms with the following traits: duration of transition from the first use to dependence (DTFUD), subjective pleasure responses to opioid on first use and post-dependence use, and OD risk in 425 Chinese with OD and 514 healthy controls. DTFUD and level of pleasure responses were examined using a semi-structured interview. The DTFUD of opioid addicts ranged from 5 days to 11 years. Most addicts (64.0%) reported non-comfortable response upon first opioid use, while after dependence, most addicts (53.0%) felt strong opioid-induced pleasure. Survival analysis revealed a correlation of prolonged DTFUD with the minor allele-carrying genotypes of DRD1 rs4532 (hazard ratios (HR) = 0.694; p = 0.001) and rs686 (HR = 0.681, p = 0.0003). Binary logistic regression indicated that rs10063995 GT genotype (vs. GG+TT, OR = 0.261) could predict decreased pleasure response to first-time use and the minor alleles of rs686 (OR = 0.535) and rs4532 (OR = 0.537) could predict decreased post-dependence pleasure. Moreover, rs686 minor allele was associated with a decreased risk for rapid transition from initial use to dependence (DTFUD≤30 days; OR = 0.603) or post-dependence euphoria (OR = 0.603) relative to major allele. In conclusion, DRD1 rs686 minor allele decreases the OD risk by prolonging the transition to dependence and attenuating opioid-induced pleasure in Chinese. © 2013 Zhu et al.


Guo Y.-C.,Xi'an Jiaotong University | Guo Y.-C.,Key Laboratory of the Education Ministry for Environment and Genes Related to Diseases | Yan C.-X.,Xi'an Jiaotong University | Yan C.-X.,Key Laboratory of the Education Ministry for Environment and Genes Related to Diseases | And 11 more authors.
Archives of Oral Biology | Year: 2014

Dental age estimation is of great importance for individual identification in forensic medicine and many other fields of study. Among them, tooth eruption is a parameter developmental morphology that can be determined by clinical examinations or by dental X-rays. The purpose of present research is to study the chronological course of third molars eruption in a Chinese population and compare that with other ethnic population for age estimation. A total of 1135 conventional orthopantomograms from 506 male and 629 female northern Chinese subjects aged between 11 and 26 years were analyzed. The eruption status of the third molars was assessed using the developmental stages described by Olze et al. Results showed that the third molars 18, 28, 38 and 48 in the stage A showed significant younger average age in males than in females. The Olze's stage A could be used as a reference stage to determine whether a male or female northern Chinese is likely to be equal or above age 16, with 99.6-100% and 97.4-98.1% of correct predictions, respectively. The stage D was found to be a useful marker for diagnosing age under 16 years, with 98.9-100% and 100% of correct predictions in males and females, respectively. There were some significant differences of the chronological course of the third molars eruption in different ethnic groups, which indicated that population-specific standards could enhance the accuracy of forensic age estimation based on third molar eruption. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

Loading Key Laboratory of the Education Ministry for Environment and Genes Related to Diseases collaborators
Loading Key Laboratory of the Education Ministry for Environment and Genes Related to Diseases collaborators