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Jiang S.-H.,Ocean University of China | Song C.-H.,Ocean University of China | Li S.-Z.,Ocean University of China | Li S.-Z.,Key Laboratory of Submarine Geosciences and Exploration Techniques | And 2 more authors.
Zhongguo Shiyou Daxue Xuebao (Ziran Kexue Ban)/Journal of China University of Petroleum (Edition of Natural Science) | Year: 2013

Based on the interpretation of seismic profiles and analysis of fault pattern, three different geological models named single-force thrusting, double-force slipping and basement uplifting were proposed by analyzing the relationship between denudation and sedimentation at the two sides of the fault in Hami depression. Three test fault activity formulas for those different models were given to calculate vertical displacements of the major faults during the Indosinian, the Yanshanian and the Himalayan periods. The results show that the thrusting in Huoshizhen sag is intensive during the Indosinian period, but became weaker and weaker during the Yanshanian period, the activity of fault enhanced only in the south boundary during the Himalayan period. While the thrusting in Sanbao sag initiated during the Indosinian period, and became more intensive during the Yanshanian period, then terminated during the Himalayan period. Differentiation of the fault activity in different sags directly control the formation and evolution of the structural patterns in these sags. The tectonic framework of Huoshizhen sag basically developed during the Indo-china movement, while that of Sanbao sag finally developed after the Yanshanian movement. Source


Li S.,Key Laboratory of Submarine Geosciences and Exploration Techniques | Li S.,Ocean University of China | Santosh M.,Kochi University | Zhao G.,University of Hong Kong | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Asian Earth Sciences | Year: 2012

Since Mesozoic, the South China region has been located at the center of a triangular area surrounded by westward subduction of the Pacific plate, northward subduction of the India Plate beneath the Eurasia Plate, and collision of the North and South China blocks along the Central China Orogen. This region thus marks the frontier of a super-convergent regime. Within the super-convergence domain, the compressional structures in the center of the South China Block are mainly characterized by shortening, thrusting and decollement. The block underwent inhomogeneous rejuvenation of the pre-existing crust and lithospheric structures through reactivation of late-stage activities. The surface deformation of the Xuefeng Intracontinental Tectonic System within the South China Block is possibly derived from intraplate tectonics. Particularly, the distinct magmatism between the west and east limbs of the Xuefeng Precambrian Uplift is a possible response of the rheological structure of the lithosphere. The deep structures as revealed from tomographic studies show marked difference of lithosphere architecture between the eastern and western sub-blocks of the South China Block. These data illustrate the long-term mosaic of multi-block convergence which led to present-day inhomogeneity in the continental lithosphere in South China. A comparison of the intensive contraction of the South China Block with the distinct features of rifting of the North China Block, brings out the contrasting structural and tectonic signatures developed in the same frontier of one of the largest super-convergent systems on the globe during the Mesozoic to Cenozoic. © 2011. Source


Guo L.,Ocean University of China | Guo L.,Key Laboratory of Submarine Geosciences and Exploration Techniques | Li S.,Ocean University of China | Li S.,Key Laboratory of Submarine Geosciences and Exploration Techniques | And 10 more authors.
Journal of Asian Earth Sciences | Year: 2015

The Zhangjiakou-Penglai Fault Zone (ZPFZ), as a large-scale WNW-trending active fault zone with frequent seismic activity, is an area prone to moderate to intense earthquakes across North China. A detailed analysis of the ZPFZ has been carried out based on earthquake activity, deep structural response, dynamic mechanism and physical simulation by conducting an en échelon fault model experiment. The results show that the ZPFZ is a lithospheric active fault zone that has controlled some small en échelon Quaternary pull-apart basins and has triggered many earthquakes as seismogenic structures. The earthquake location and intensity distribution by the experimental simulation fit well with those of actual earthquakes. The earthquake distribution is controlled obviously by the en échelon structural properties. The intensity of seismic activity is strong in the middle and weak at the western and eastern ends of the fault zone, migrating from the southeast to the northwest along the entire fault zone. This WNW-trending fault zone in North China, is closely related to the surrounding plate activities. The ZPFZ is not only dominated by the collision of the Indian Plate to the Eurasian Plate, but is also influenced by the subduction of the Pacific Plate. It depends on the comprehensive reflection of two geodynamic settings from the western collision of the Indian to the Eurasian plates and the eastern subduction of the Pacific Ocean Plate to the Eurasian Plate. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Li S.Z.,Key Laboratory of Submarine Geosciences and Exploration Techniques | Li S.Z.,Ocean University of China | Suo Y.H.,Key Laboratory of Submarine Geosciences and Exploration Techniques | Suo Y.H.,Ocean University of China | And 11 more authors.
Geological Journal | Year: 2013

Since the Mesozoic, the North China Craton has been located at a triangular junction surrounded by subduction or collision zones. This craton thus marks the frontier of a super-convergent regime. Within the super-convergence tectonic domains, however, distinct extensional regimes operated in the Meso-Cenozoic Bohai Bay Basin located at the eastern part of the North China Craton. In this synthesis, we focus on the intracontinental dynamics during the Mesozoic to Cenozoic in the North China Craton. Whereas the deep structures as revealed from tomographic studies show a remarkable difference between the Western and Eastern blocks of the North China Craton, the shallow setting in both regions is characterized by super-convergence. We propose here that the tectonic scenario of the Bohai Bay Basin developed during the destruction of the North China Craton is largely characterized by Mesozoic extrusion and Cenozoic NW-directed intracrustal extension with pull-apart. The Cenozoic deep process is mainly a regional far-field eastward upwelling of the asthenosphere beneath the western tectonic domain due to the India-Eurasia Plate collision accompanied by the eastward jump and rollback of the subducting Pacific Plate. The deep processes under the Bohai Bay Basin in the Mesozoic are local delamination and magma underplating. Our study highlights the contrasting structural and tectonic signature developed in the frontier of one of the largest super-convergent systems on the globe. © 2013 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd. Source


Ma Y.,Key Laboratory of Submarine Geosciences and Exploration Techniques | Ma Y.,Ocean University of China | Li S.,Key Laboratory of Submarine Geosciences and Exploration Techniques | Li S.,Ocean University of China | And 9 more authors.
Jilin Daxue Xuebao (Diqiu Kexue Ban)/Journal of Jilin University (Earth Science Edition) | Year: 2012

Submarine landslides has been gradually attracted attentions because of exploration and exploitation of submarine gashydrate in the past decade. Submarine landslides in the Qiongdongnan basin, Northern South China Sea generally occur in continental slope where gashydrate usually accumulates. They play an important role to their development and exploration. We analyze the detailed geometric characteristics of submarine landslides in the Qiongdongnan basin based on the preexisting 2D seismic profiles to identify three major slide planes which are caused by three landslide events. Each landslide event can be divided into several secondary landslide stages. Typical landslide topography such as slide scarps, slide plane, slide terraces, slide valleys are widely developed in the study area. Based on preliminarily estimated, the Qiongdongnan submarine landslides cover an area of about 2500 km2. The submarine landslides are controlled by continental slope, active faults, sea-level drops, gravity of sediments, seabottom flows, gas hydrate dissociation and other factors. Combined with chronostratigraphic framework, the active period of the landslides in the Qiongdongnan basin can be identified between Late Pliocene and Quaternary. Source

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