Key Laboratory of South China Sea Fishery Resources Development and Utilization

Guangzhou, China

Key Laboratory of South China Sea Fishery Resources Development and Utilization

Guangzhou, China
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Gu Y.-G.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | Gu Y.-G.,Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fishery Ecology and Environment | Gu Y.-G.,Key Laboratory of South China Sea Fishery Resources Development and Utilization | Li H.-B.,CAS Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology | And 2 more authors.
Ecological Engineering | Year: 2017

The unprecedented rate at which economy, urbanization and industrialization have occurred in China in the last few decades has resulted in environmental pollution in China. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of great concern because of their persistence, long-range transport properties, and health risk as potential carcinogens and mutagens. Plateau lakes are special ecosystem and located in remote western China. To our knowledge, studies on PAHs in sediments of plateau deep lakes in China are scarce. Therefore, PAHs in surface sediments from Fuxian Lake, the largest deep plateau lake in China, were investigated. The total PAH concentrations ranged from 83.2 to 261.7, with a mean concentration of 143.3 ng/g. Four-ring PAHs (39.1–73.9%) were most abundant in all samples. The composition of PAHs was characterized by high molecular weight PAHs, and FA and PHE were the dominant constituents. A correlation analysis revealed that TOC was positively significantly correlated with total PAHs, while percentages of grain size fraction were poorly correlated with total PAHs. PAH diagnostic ratios demonstrated that PAHs mainly originated from biomass, coal, and petroleum combustion. Taking as a whole, surface sediments of Fuxian Lake had a 9% incidence of adverse biological effects based on the mean effects range-median quotient. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Wang L.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | Wang L.,Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fishery Ecology and Environment | Wang L.,Key Laboratory of South China Sea Fishery Resources Development and Utilization | Du F.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | And 11 more authors.
Oceanologia | Year: 2016

The relationships between the small cyclopoid copepod Oithona and hydrological factors, phytoplankton and ichthyoplankton were evaluated using the data obtained in the central South China Sea (SCS) in summer 2014. The genus abundance ranged from 6.00indm-3 to 93.75indm-3 with high abundance band occurring in the branch of SCS Monsoon Jet. The lower temperature and higher salinity in the surface water of the band than other zones indicated that deep water intrusion was a positive factor for aggregation of the genus. The community structure of the genus was dominated by Oithona plumifera and Oithona similis made up 97% of the genus abundance associated with Oithona tenuis. The result of db-RDA analysis showed that the community structure of the genus was affected by temperature, Chl a, larval fishes and fish spawns, and temperature was the most important limiting factor. The result of GAMs analysis showed that abundance of O. tenuis, and copepodites were affected by Chl a, larval fishes and fish spawns; abundance of O. similis was affected by Chl a and fish spawns; and abundance of O. plumifera was affected by Chl a and larval fishes. Therefore, we suggest that the branch of SCS Monsoon Jet and deep water intrusion favor aggregation of plankton in the central SCS in summer. We confirm that the temperature is the limiting factor to the reproduction of the genus Oithona in tropic seas and the genus Oithona is a food-web linker between primary production and larval fishes in the central SCS. © 2017 Institute of Oceanology of the Polish Academy of Sciences.


Li Y.-F.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | Li Y.-F.,Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fishery Ecology and Environment | Li Y.-F.,Key Laboratory of South China Sea Fishery Resources Development and Utilization | Du F.-Y.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | And 11 more authors.
Zoological Studies | Year: 2017

Sonneratia apetala, a non-native superior rapidly growing mangrove species with wide environmental tolerance, has been introduced to Futian National Nature Reserve in Shenzhen, Guangdong, China, for mangrove restoration since 1993. However, the community structure of the associated macrobenthic fauna, a vital component of energy flow and nutrient recycling, remains obscure. The present study analyzed the macrobenthic faunal community, associated habitat characteristics and physico-chemical properties of sediment in rehabilitated S. apetala forests at stand ages of 8, 9, 14, 16 and 20 years from November 2014 to May 2015. Habitat complexity and stand structural heterogeneity varied with stand age. Sediment physico-chemical properties were similar for all stands analyzed, although soil organic matter (SOM) content was significantly higher in the 20-year-old stand than in others. Shannon-Weaver (H’) and Pielou’s evenness (J) indices of macrobenthic fauna were highest in 14-and 16-year-old stands, respectively, and lowest in 8-year-old stands. In contrast, abundance and biomass peaked in 8-year-old stands and were lowest in 16-year-old stands. Multivariate analysis (cluster, ANOSIM and SIMPER) showed that the macrobenthic faunal community in the 20-year-old stand was different from other stand ages because of a greater abundance of small-sized mollusks and opportunistic species. Spearman correlation analysis showed that H’ was positively correlated with salinity. The distance-based linear model suggested that SOM was a significant predictor variable correlated with the macrobenthic faunal community. However, SOM was the only significant predictor variable explaining 12.7% of the total variation; this implies that the spatial variation of the macrobenthic faunal community here was mostly independent of the sediment properties measured. Therefore, we conclude that habitat characteristics such as vegetation characteristics can potentially explain the majority of the variation. © 2017, Academia Sinica. All rights reserved.


Gu Y.-G.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | Gu Y.-G.,Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fishery Ecology and Environment | Gu Y.-G.,Key Laboratory of South China Sea Fishery Resources Development and Utilization | Wang X.-N.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | And 17 more authors.
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety | Year: 2016

The fuzzy comprehensive assessment was undertaken to evaluate the marine sediment quality in Daya Bay, China based on the monitoring data of 2015 and China National Standard for Marine Sediment Quality (GB 18668-2002). The results demonstrated that the average metal concentrations (mg/kg) were 0.08 (Cd), 51.30 (Pb), 91.30 (Cr), 29.63 (Cu), 143.42 (Zn), 0.03 (Hg), and 7.31 (As), which were clearly higher with respect to their corresponding background values. Cr was the major pollutant based weight matrices calculated. Taken as whole, the membership degree of class I was a range from 0.65 to 1, suggesting that the marine sediment quality in Daya Bay belongs to class I. Pb stable isotopic analysis coupled with geographic information system (GIS) approach showed the sedimentary Pb mainly originated from petrochemical industry at northwest coast of Daya Bay. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


Gu Y.-G.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | Gu Y.-G.,Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fishery Ecology and Environment | Gu Y.-G.,Key Laboratory of South China Sea Fishery Resources Development and Utilization | Huang H.-H.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | And 5 more authors.
Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology | Year: 2016

Heavy metal concentrations in edible organisms from the core area of Daya Bay's Fishery Resource Reserve, South China Sea, were determined. Samples of 14 crustacean, fish, and shellfish species were collected and analyzed. The As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations were 0.18-1.16, 0.002-0.919, 0.40-2.85, 0.07-4.10, 0.004-0.055, 0.14-1.19, 0.014-0.070, and 4.57-15.94 μg/g wet weight, respectively. The As concentrations were higher than the Chinese maximum permissible levels in all of the fish and shellfish species and two crustacean species, indicating that consumption of these wild species by humans may pose health risks. However, calculations of the health risks posed to humans indicated that no significant adverse health effects would be associated with consuming these species. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.


Gu Y.-G.,Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fishery Ecology and Environment | Gu Y.-G.,Key Laboratory of South China Sea Fishery Resources Development and Utilization | Gu Y.-G.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | Lin Q.,Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fishery Ecology and Environment | And 14 more authors.
Marine Pollution Bulletin | Year: 2015

We investigated the total concentrations of heavy metals in surface sediments and nekton, along with sediment metal chemical partitioning in Qinzhou Bay of the Beibu Gulf. Cd was preferentially associated with the acid-soluble fraction and Pb mainly with the reducible fraction, whereas a major portion of Cr, Ni, Cu, and Zn was strongly associated with the residual fractions. A principal component analysis (PCA) in sediment metal speciation revealed three groupings (Cd; Pb; Cr, Ni, Cu, and Zn) that mainly resulted from different distributions of the metals in the various fractions. The Cr concentrations in nekton species were higher than maximum Cr concentrations permitted by the Chinese National Standard (GB 2762-2012). Taking as a whole, surface sediments of Qinzhou Bay had a 21% incidence calculation of adverse biological effects, based on the mean probable-effects-levels quotient. A human health risk assessment indicated no significant adverse health effects from consumption of nekton. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

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