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Gu Y.-G.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | Gu Y.-G.,Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fishery Ecology and Environment | Gu Y.-G.,Key Laboratory of South China Sea Fishery Resources Development and Utilization | Huang H.-H.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | And 5 more authors.
Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology | Year: 2016

Heavy metal concentrations in edible organisms from the core area of Daya Bay's Fishery Resource Reserve, South China Sea, were determined. Samples of 14 crustacean, fish, and shellfish species were collected and analyzed. The As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations were 0.18-1.16, 0.002-0.919, 0.40-2.85, 0.07-4.10, 0.004-0.055, 0.14-1.19, 0.014-0.070, and 4.57-15.94 μg/g wet weight, respectively. The As concentrations were higher than the Chinese maximum permissible levels in all of the fish and shellfish species and two crustacean species, indicating that consumption of these wild species by humans may pose health risks. However, calculations of the health risks posed to humans indicated that no significant adverse health effects would be associated with consuming these species. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. Source


Gu Y.-G.,Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fishery Ecology and Environment | Gu Y.-G.,Key Laboratory of South China Sea Fishery Resources Development and Utilization | Gu Y.-G.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | Lin Q.,Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fishery Ecology and Environment | And 14 more authors.
Marine Pollution Bulletin | Year: 2015

We investigated the total concentrations of heavy metals in surface sediments and nekton, along with sediment metal chemical partitioning in Qinzhou Bay of the Beibu Gulf. Cd was preferentially associated with the acid-soluble fraction and Pb mainly with the reducible fraction, whereas a major portion of Cr, Ni, Cu, and Zn was strongly associated with the residual fractions. A principal component analysis (PCA) in sediment metal speciation revealed three groupings (Cd; Pb; Cr, Ni, Cu, and Zn) that mainly resulted from different distributions of the metals in the various fractions. The Cr concentrations in nekton species were higher than maximum Cr concentrations permitted by the Chinese National Standard (GB 2762-2012). Taking as a whole, surface sediments of Qinzhou Bay had a 21% incidence calculation of adverse biological effects, based on the mean probable-effects-levels quotient. A human health risk assessment indicated no significant adverse health effects from consumption of nekton. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Gu Y.-G.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | Gu Y.-G.,Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fishery Ecology and Environment | Gu Y.-G.,Key Laboratory of South China Sea Fishery Resources Development and Utilization | Wang X.-N.,CAS South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute | And 17 more authors.
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety | Year: 2016

The fuzzy comprehensive assessment was undertaken to evaluate the marine sediment quality in Daya Bay, China based on the monitoring data of 2015 and China National Standard for Marine Sediment Quality (GB 18668-2002). The results demonstrated that the average metal concentrations (mg/kg) were 0.08 (Cd), 51.30 (Pb), 91.30 (Cr), 29.63 (Cu), 143.42 (Zn), 0.03 (Hg), and 7.31 (As), which were clearly higher with respect to their corresponding background values. Cr was the major pollutant based weight matrices calculated. Taken as whole, the membership degree of class I was a range from 0.65 to 1, suggesting that the marine sediment quality in Daya Bay belongs to class I. Pb stable isotopic analysis coupled with geographic information system (GIS) approach showed the sedimentary Pb mainly originated from petrochemical industry at northwest coast of Daya Bay. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Source

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