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Zhou T.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Zhou T.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | Zhou W.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Zhou W.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | And 7 more authors.
Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology | Year: 2011

Pyrethroids act on the nervous system as a primary target organ and exert their neurotoxic effects primarily by altering the conductance of sodium channel, leading to hyperexcitation. However, few studies investigated the effects of pyrethroids on neuronal excitability of honeybee brain neurons. In this study, a whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record current threshold, the minimum current to induce an action potential, and peak sodium current in the dissociated honeybee brain neurons treated with bifenthrin, deltamethrin and fluvalinate in vitro & in vivo. The study showed that these pyrethroids greatly suppressed the neuronal excitability as revealed by increasing current injected and inhibited the peak sodium current in honeybees. The three pyrethroids also inhibited steady-state inactivation in addition to reduction of sodium peak current. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Chen C.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Chen C.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | Liu Z.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Liu Z.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | And 10 more authors.
Molecular Biology and Evolution | Year: 2016

Studying the genetic signatures of climate-driven selection can produce insights into local adaptation and the potential impacts of climate change on populations. The honey bee (Apis mellifera) is an interesting species to study local adaptation because it originated in tropical/subtropical climatic regions and subsequently spread into temperate regions. However, little is known about the genetic basis of its adaptation to temperate climates. Here, we resequenced the whole genomes of ten individual bees from a newly discovered population in temperate China and downloaded resequenced data from 35 individuals from other populations. We found that the new population is an undescribed subspecies in the M-lineage of A. mellifera (Apis mellifera sinisxinyuan). Analyses of population history show that long-term global temperature has strongly influenced the demographic history of A. m. sinisxinyuan and its divergence from other subspecies. Further analyses comparing temperate and tropical populations identified several candidate genes related to fat body and the Hippo signaling pathway that are potentially involved in adaptation to temperate climates. Our results provide insights into the demographic history of the newly discovered A. m. sinisxinyuan, as well as the genetic basis of adaptation of A. mellifera to temperate climates at the genomic level. These findings will facilitate the selective breeding of A. mellifera to improve the survival of overwintering colonies. © 2016 The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.


Dai P.-L.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Dai P.-L.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | Zhou W.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Zhang J.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | And 9 more authors.
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety | Year: 2012

Honeybees may be exposed to insecticidal proteins from transgenic plants via pollen. An assessment of the impact of such exposures on the honeybee is an essential part of the risk assessment process for transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis corn. A field trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of transgenic Bt cry1Ah corn on the honeybee Apis mellifera ligustica. Colonies of honeybees were moved to Bt or non-Bt corn fields during anthesis and then sampled to record their survival, development and behavior. No differences in immature stages, worker survival, bee body weight, hypopharyngeal gland weight, colony performance, foraging activity or olfactory learning abilities were detected between colonies that were placed in non-Bt corn fields and those placed in Bt corn fields. We conclude that cry1Ah corn carries no risk for the survival, development, colony performance or behavior of the honeybee A. mellifera ligustica. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.


Dai P.-L.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Dai P.-L.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | Zhou W.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Zhang J.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | And 9 more authors.
Apidologie | Year: 2012

We conducted feeding trials in a laboratory setting to test for possible adverse effects of Cry1Ah toxin mixed thoroughly into sugar syrup (60% w/v sucrose solution) at three concentrations (10 ìg/mL, 10 ng/mL, and 1 ng/mL) on the survival, pollen consumption, and hypopharyngeal gland mass of Apis mellifera ligustica and Apis cerana cerana. No significant differences in the survival of A. mellifera or A. cerana were found among groups fed on sugar syrup with or without Cry1Ah toxin. No significant differences were found in the longevity of A. mellifera fed sugar syrup with Cry1Ah toxin compared with the control. No differences were detected in the pollen consumption of A. mellifera ligustica and A. cerana cerana. No significant differences were found in the hypopharyngeal gland weight of 12-day-old honeybees A. mellifera ligustica and A. cerana cerana fed on sugar syrup with Cry1Ah toxin compared with the control. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of the risks of transgenic corn crops for honeybees. 2012 INRA, DIB and Springer-Verlag, France.


Dai P.-L.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Dai P.-L.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | Wang Q.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Wang Q.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | And 8 more authors.
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry | Year: 2010

Bifenthrin and deltamethrin have been widely used as pesticides in agriculture and forestry and are becoming an increasing risk to honeybees. The honeybee, Apis mellifera ligustica, is widely recognized as a beneficial insect of agronomic, ecological, and scientific importance. It is important to understand what effects these chemicals have on bees. Effects of two pesticides at sublethal concentrations on fecundity, growth, and development of honeybees were examined with the feeding method for a three-year period (2006-2008). It was shown that both bifenthrin and deltamethrin significantly reduced bee fecundity, decreased the rate at which bees develop to adulthood, and increased their immature periods. The toxicity of bifenthrin and deltamethrin on workers of Apis mellifera ligustica was also assessed, and the results from the present study showed that the median lethal effects of bifenthrin and deltamethrin were 16.7 and 62.8 mg/L, respectively. © 2009 SETAC.


Hou C.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Hou C.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | Li B.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Li B.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Invertebrate Pathology | Year: 2016

Although many honey bee RNA viruses have been correlated with colony declines, little is known regarding the potential role of DNA viruses. Here, we examined seemingly healthy and crawling bee samples from China using PCR to identify whether Apis mellifera filamentous virus (AmFV) was present in A. cerana cerana. The highest AmFV infection percentage among Chinese provinces occurred in crawling bees from Gansu province (85.48%), and the lowest was in bees from Beijing (31.58%). A phylogenetic analysis showed that the Chinese isolate of AmFV exhibited a high genetic similarity with isolates from Belgium, Switzerland and USA. This is the first report of AmFV infections in Chinese A. cerana cerana populations. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


Liu Z.G.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Liu Z.G.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | Chen C.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Guo H.K.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | And 3 more authors.
Shengtai Xuebao/ Acta Ecologica Sinica | Year: 2016

In recent years, large-scale losses of honeybee (Apis mellifera) colonies have taken place in Europe and North America. Apiculture scientists have organized a CoLoss Network to investigate and explain these losses. This article presents survey results and analyses of honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colony mortality from 2009 to 2013 in 12 provinces in China, analyses of the proportions of colony mortality, and their possible causes. Standard questionnaires were used in this survey, as supplied by CoLoss, and financial support was provided by the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST). All statistical analyses were performed using R statistical software. A generalized linear mixed effects model (GLMM) was used to analyze potential risk factors. In total, more than 5300 beekeepers responded to the survey. This included less than half of the Apis cerana survey data set. A total of 3742 apiaries, which were part of the valuable Apis mellifera dataset that contains 520653 colonies, were also statistically analyzed in this paper. Average mortality over the winters of 2009-2013 was estimated to be 8.9%. The loss (12%) during the winter of 2011-2012 was higher than in other years. This level of mortality was considered acceptable by beekeepers and apiculture scientists. There was substantial variation in total loss by province (range 2.3%-19%). Xinjiang Province and Henan Province differed significantly from other provinces in their average loss. Average loss also differed significantly by type of operation, such as commercial, part-time, and sideline operations, although part-time and sideline operations did not differ significantly from each other during most surveyed years. Xinjiang Province and Henan Province have large numbers of commercial beekeeping operations. Province and operational data were calculated collectively, and the results supported the hypothesis that commercial beekeeping operations caused frequent honeybee queen failure and fostered the spread of other diseases, confirming that these were the two causes of colony loss. Colony collapse disorder (CCD) was not a common problem in China until recently. Overall rates of colony loss were low in general, with differences among operations of different sizes and among different provinces. The GLMM results highlighted several factors that have a significant effect on winter losses. The frequency of comb renewal and problems with the queens were responsible for most losses. The rates of colony mortality were considered acceptable, and the symptoms of colony mortality did not match those of CCD. The parasitic mite Varroa destructor was not found to be the main cause of these losses. This is because beekeepers regularly treat colonies for Varroa destructor in early spring before the queens lay most of their eggs and again in late fall. This twice-yearly treatment kept the colonies in normal or better conditions before the onset of winter. Improving the frequency of comb renewal, strengthening the prevention and control of bee mites and other diseases, monitoring the queens, and increasing the use of the new queens may keep colony mortality within acceptable ranges. This is the first nationwide investigation of Apis mellifera colony losses. These results could help prevent and control honey bee colony losses in China. © 2016, Ecological Society of China. All rights reserved.


Xuan H.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | Xuan H.,Liaocheng University | Wang Y.,Liaocheng University | Li A.,Liaocheng University | And 2 more authors.
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine | Year: 2016

To understand the material basis of antitumor activity of Chinese propolis water extract (CPWE), we developed a simple and efficient method using macroporous absorptive resin coupled with preparative high performance liquid chromatography and separated and purified eleven chemical components (caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid, pinobanksin, caffeic acid benzyl ester, caffeic acid phenethyl ester, apigenin, pinocembrin, chrysin, and galangin) from CPWE; then we tested the antitumor activities of these eleven components using different human tumor cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, HeLa, and A549). Furthermore, cell migration, procaspase 3 level, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of effective components from CPWE were investigated. Our data showed that antitumor activities of the eleven components from CPWE were different from each other. CPWE and its effective components induced apoptosis by inhibiting tumor cell migration, activating caspase 3, and promoting ROS production. It can be deduced that the antitumor effects of propolis did not depend on a single component, and there must exist "bioactive components," which also provides a new idea for Chinese propolis quality control. © 2016 Hongzhuan Xuan et al.


Luo Q.H.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | Luo Q.H.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Zhou T.,Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology | Zhou T.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | And 8 more authors.
Experimental and Applied Acarology | Year: 2011

Tropilaelapsmercedesae is a serious ectoparasite of Apismellifera in China. The aim of this study was to investigate the infestation rates and intensity of T. mercedesae in A. mellifera in China, and to explore the relative importance of climate, district, management practices and beekeeper characteristics that are assumed to be associated with the intensity of T. mercedesae. Of the 410 participating apiaries, 379 apiaries were included in analyses of seasonal infestation rates and 352 apiaries were included in multivariable regression analysis. The highest infestation rate (86.3%) of T. mercedesae was encountered in autumn, followed by summer (66.5%), spring (17.2%) and winter (14.8%). In autumn, 28.9% (93) of the infested apiaries were in the north (including the northeast and northwest of China), 71.1% (229) were in the central and south (including east, southeast and southwest China), and 306 apiaries (82.9%) were co-infested by both T. mercedesae and Varroa. Multivariable regression analysis showed that geographical location, season, royal jelly collection and Varroa infestation were the factors that influence the intensity of T. mercedesae. The influence of beekeeper's education, time of beekeeping, operation size, and hive migration on the intensity of T. mercedesa was not statistically significant. This study provided information about the establishment of the linkage of the environment and the parasite and could lead to better timing and methods of control. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


PubMed | Liaocheng University and Key Laboratory of Pollinating Insect Biology
Type: | Journal: Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM | Year: 2016

To understand the material basis of antitumor activity of Chinese propolis water extract (CPWE), we developed a simple and efficient method using macroporous absorptive resin coupled with preparative high performance liquid chromatography and separated and purified eleven chemical components (caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid, pinobanksin, caffeic acid benzyl ester, caffeic acid phenethyl ester, apigenin, pinocembrin, chrysin, and galangin) from CPWE; then we tested the antitumor activities of these eleven components using different human tumor cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, HeLa, and A549). Furthermore, cell migration, procaspase 3 level, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of effective components from CPWE were investigated. Our data showed that antitumor activities of the eleven components from CPWE were different from each other. CPWE and its effective components induced apoptosis by inhibiting tumor cell migration, activating caspase 3, and promoting ROS production. It can be deduced that the antitumor effects of propolis did not depend on a single component, and there must exist bioactive components, which also provides a new idea for Chinese propolis quality control.

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