Key Laboratory of Pests Detection and Control for Tropical Agriculture

Hainan, China

Key Laboratory of Pests Detection and Control for Tropical Agriculture

Hainan, China
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Zhang F.,Environment and Plant Protection Institute | Zhang F.,Key Laboratory of Monitoring and Control of Tropical Agricultural and Forest Invasive Alien pests | Zhang F.,Key Laboratory of Pests Detection and Control for Tropical Agriculture | Fu Y.,Environment and Plant Protection Institute | And 14 more authors.
Shengtai Xuebao/ Acta Ecologica Sinica | Year: 2010

Coccophagus ceroplastae is an important parasitic wasp, endoparasitizing the 2 nd and 3 rd instar larva of Parasaissetia nigra. In this paper, the morphological characteristics of C. ceroplastae were described, and behaviors, development, survival, and reproduction of the wasp were also studied in the lab. The results showed that life cycle of C. ceroplastae lasted 21 -26 days, including eggs, 3 larva instars, prepupae, pupae and adults. Duration from eggs to pupae was 14 - 17d, and that of pupae was 7-9d. The reproductive system of female was located in the abdomen, with a pair of eudipleural ovaries, and each ovary consisted of 3 ovary tubes. The ligament composed of terminal filament was separate, and didn't joint to median ligament. Ovaries started to develop in the pupa phase. Some eggs are matured in 6-day-old pupae. Mature eggs in the ovaries reached 63.9, 154.7, and 163.2 in 7-day-old pupae, adults just emerged, and adults one day later, respectively. Addition of nutritions in the adult phase had no significant effects on egg number, which indicated that C. ceroplastae is a pro-ovigenic parasitoid. Mating happened just after eclosion and lasted 2 -3 seconds, and there was mating competition behavior among male wasps. Male wasps could mate several times, but female ones could only mate once. Mating obviously promoted oviposition. An unmated and mated female wasp laid averagely 2 and 164 eggs, respectively, in the 3 rd instar nymph of P. nigra, under the same conditions, which were 82 times in the difference. C. ceroplastae oviposited after mating, and oviposition duration lasted 5-8 seconds. Oviposition behavior included host searching, host inspecting, ovipositor probing, laying eggs and ovipositor pulling out. The wasps had poor ability to distinguish between parasitized and unparasitized hosts. Superparasitism existed, and one wasp might lay eggs repeatedly in a single host, but only one egg could develop into adults. Eclosion peaked in 8:00 - 10:00am. There was a circular eclosion hole, with irregular edges, about 0. 2 -0. 6 mm in diameter, located in the back of dorsal raphe near the anal cleft of host. Temperature, relative humidity (RH), and photoperiod affected eclosion rhythm of the wasp. Eclosion peaked during 08:00 - 10: 00 AM at 20 and 24°C. Under suitable temperature, eclosion emerged intensively. Proportion of eclosion reached 89.36% and 88. 89% during 08:00 - 10:00 AM at 20 and 24°C, respectively. The peak of eclosion happened during 06: 00 -08: 00 AM at 14°C, with only 31.71% adult eclosing. Eclosion peaked during 06: 00 -08: 00 and 08: 00 - 10: 00 AM at 20% and 30% - 90% RH, respectively. At the photoperiod (L:D = 12:12), eclosion emerged intensively, with 88. 89% adult eclosing during the eclosion peak. Longer or shorter photoperiods could scatter eclosion. Temperature and addition of nutritions had significant influences on longevities of adult wasps. Female wasp lived shorter, with the increasing of temperatures. At the same temperature, addition of nutritions offered could prolong the longevities of adult wasps, and to a greater extent with the increasing of nutrition concentration. The longest-lived adult wasps were those offered 10% sucrose, secondly 10% honey, lastly offered clear water or no nutrition.


Zhang F.,Environment and Plant Protection Institute | Zhang F.,Key Laboratory of Pests Detection and Control for Tropical Agriculture | Fu Y.,Environment and Plant Protection Institute | Fu Y.,Key Laboratory of Pests Detection and Control for Tropical Agriculture | And 8 more authors.
Shengtai Xuebao/ Acta Ecologica Sinica | Year: 2010

Coccophagus ceroplastae is one of the important parasitoids of Parasaissetia nigra. In this paper, the development, fecundity per female and parasitism rates of C. ceroplastae were studied at different constant temperatures and photoperiods, respectively. The results showed that temperature and photoperiod had significant effects on population growth of C. ceroplastae. C. ceroplastae could not complete its life history at 32°C. The development rate increased significantly with the increase of temperature between 18°C and 27°C. The development duration were the longest at 18°C (54. Od) and the shortest at 21°C (22. 8d). The thermal threshold and effective accumulated temperature of C. ceroplastae were 12.16°C and 307.62 day-degree, respectively. High and low temperatures were not suitable for the parasitisation of C. ceroplastae. The parasitism rate of C. ceroplastae was the highest at21°C (36.0%) and the lowest at 30 (4. 5%). Giving the development duration, body length, parasitic rate and fecundity per female, 21 - 27°C was optimal for the development and reproduction of C. ceroplastae, while the temperature over 30was not suitable for its survival and development. C. ceroplastae was sensitive to the photoperiod. The development rate and fecundity per female increased with the increase of illumination time. The development duration was the shortest (24. 8d) at the condition of L:D = 16-8h and the longest (27. 8d) at the condition of L:D = 10-14h. The fecundity per female was the highest (119. 6 eggs) at the condition of L:D = 16-8h and the lowest (86.2 eggs) at the condition of L:D 10-14h. Giving the development duration, fecundity and parasitic rate, L:D = 14 - 16-8 - 10 h was most suitable for the population growth of C. ceroplastae.


Qi Y.-X.,Chinese Academy of Sciences | Qi Y.-X.,Key Laboratory of Monitoring and Control of Tropical Agricultural and Forest Invasive Alien Pests | Qi Y.-X.,Key Laboratory of Pests Detection and Control for Tropical Agriculture | Pu J.-J.,Chinese Academy of Sciences | And 20 more authors.
Journal of Phytopathology | Year: 2013

During 2009-2011, a dieback disease of mango (Mangifera indica) has recently emerged on mango trees in Panzhihua City, Sichuan province of China. The disease is characterized by large irregular brown-coloured speckles on the petioles and twigs, vascular necrosis and dry leaves and complete twig mortality. Fusarium species were isolated repeatedly from the infected petioles and twigs. The species was identified as Fusarium decemcellulare Brick based on morphology and sequence analysis of Translation Elongation Factor-1alpha (TEF-1α) gene. Koch's postulates were fulfilled by pathogenicity tests on potted mango seedlings. To our knowledge, this is the first record of dieback on mango caused by F. decemcellulare in China. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.


Lu Y.,Chinese Academy of Sciences | Lu Y.,Key Laboratory of Monitoring and Control of Tropical Agricultural and Forest Invasive Alien Pests | Lu Y.,Key Laboratory of Pests Detection and Control for Tropical Agriculture | Qi Y.X.,Chinese Academy of Sciences | And 14 more authors.
Genetics and Molecular Research | Year: 2013

To establish a proteomic reference map of Musa acuminate Colla (banana) leaf, we separated and identified leaf proteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). Tryptic digests of 44 spots were subjected to peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS. Three spots that were not identified by MALDI-TOF MS analysis were identified by searching against the NCBInr, SwissProt, and expressed sequence tag (EST) databases. We identified 41 unique proteins. The majority of the identified leaf proteins were found to be involved in energy metabolism. The results indicate that 2D-PAGE is a sensitive and powerful technique for the separation and identification of Musa leaf proteins. A summary of the identified proteins and their putative functions is discussed. © FUNPEC-RP.

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