Key Laboratory of Pesticide

Nanjing, China

Key Laboratory of Pesticide

Nanjing, China
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Zhang X.,Nanjing Agricultural University | Zhang X.,Key Laboratory of Monitoring and Management of Crop Diseases and Pest Insects | Zhang X.,Key Laboratory of Pesticide | Wu D.,Nanjing Agricultural University | And 17 more authors.
Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology | Year: 2014

SYP-1620, a quinone-outside-inhibitor (QoI), is a novel broad-spectrum fungicide. In this study, 108 isolates of Botrytis cinerea from different geographical regions in Jiangsu Province of China were characterized for baseline sensitivity to SYP-1620. The curves of baseline sensitivity were unimodal with a mean EC50 value of 0.0130±0.0109μg/mL for mycelial growth, 0.01147±0.0062μg/mL for spore germination, respectively. The biological characterization of SYP-1620 against B. cinerea was determined in vitro. The results indicated that SYP-1620 has a strong inhibiting effect on spore germination, mycelial growth, and respiration. The protective and curative test of SYP-1620 suggested that protective effect was better than curative either on strawberry leaves or on cucumber leaves in vivo. In addition, the biological characterization of SYP-1620-resistant mutants of B. cinerea was investigated. SYP-1620 has no cross-resistance with other types of fungicide. Compared to the sensitive isolates, the resistant mutants had lower mycelial growth and virulence but not differ in mycelial dry weight. Sequencing indicated that SYP-1620 resistance was associated with a single point mutation (G143A) in the cytochrome b gene. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Hou Y.,Nanjing Agricultural University | Hou Y.,Key Laboratory of Monitoring and Management of Crop Diseases and Pest Insects | Hou Y.,Key Laboratory of Pesticide | Zheng Z.,Nanjing Agricultural University | And 11 more authors.
Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology | Year: 2013

JS399-19 (2-cyano-3-amino-3-phenylancryic acetate), a novel cyanoacrylate fungicide, has powerful inhibition against Fusarium species, especially to Fusarium graminearum. Treated with JS399-19, mycelium of F. graminearum was distorted and swelled. The embranchment increased. In order to investigate the effect of JS399-19 on protein expression of F. graminearum, total protein of F. graminearum cultured in normal condition and that treated with 0.5μg/mL (EC90 value) JS399-19 were extracted respectively and proteomic analysis was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The expression levels of 38 proteins varied quantitatively at least twofold. 33 proteins out of the 38 were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS and MASCOT. According to the classification of physiological functions from Conserved Domain Database analysis, 19, 5, 2, 3, 2 and 2 proteins were respectively associated with metabolism, regulation, motility, defense, signal transduction, and unknown function, which indicated that energy metabolism, the synthesis and transport of proteins and DNA of F. graminearum were inhibited by JS399-19 in different degrees. The expression levels of the genes were further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analyses. This study represents the first proteomic analysis of F. graminearum treated by JS399-19 and will provide some useful information to find the mode of action of the fungicide against F. graminearum. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Duan Y.,Nanjing Agricultural University | Duan Y.,Key Laboratory of Monitoring and Management of Crop Diseases and Pest Insects | Duan Y.,Key Laboratory of Pesticide | Liu S.,Nanjing Agricultural University | And 14 more authors.
Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology | Year: 2012

The necrotrophic fungal phytopathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary has a broad host range and frequently causes destructive diseases. The extensive use of common fungicides to control these diseases has selected for resistance in populations of S. sclerotiorum. In this study, 105 isolates of S. sclerotiorum from different geographical regions in Jiangsu Province of China were characterized for baseline sensitivity to azoxystrobin, and the average EC 50 value was 0.2932μg/mL for mycelial growth. Of the mixtures of the fungicides thiram and azoxystrobin that were tested using an in vitro mycelial growth assay, the 1:4 ratio provided the greatest inhibition of S. sclerotiorum. When tested against nine isolates, the 1:4 mixture resulted in a mean synergy ratio of 2.31, indicating synergistic inhibition. Mycelial respiration was inhibited for about 2h by azoxystrobin alone but for 48h by the mixture of thiram and azoxystrobin. Salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, a known inhibitor of alternative respiration) also increased the inhibition of mycelial growth and respiration caused by azoxystrobin. These results suggest the need for further study of effects of combinations of azoxystrobin with thiram or SHAM in planta to evaluate their potential for management of diseases caused by S. sclerotiorum. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

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