Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Jiang D.,Second People Hospital | Xiao X.,Second People Hospital | Fu T.,People Hospital | Mashaghi A.,Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary | And 5 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

Purpose: Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly common systemic disease. Many diabetic patients seek cataract surgery for a better visual acuity. Unlike in the general population, the influence of cataract surgery on tear film function in diabetic patients remains elusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tear function in diabetic and nondiabetic patients following cataract surgery. Methods: In this prospective, interventional case series, 174 diabetic patients without dry eye syndrome (DES) and 474 age-matched nondiabetic patients as control who underwent phacoemulsification were enrolled at two different eye centers between January 2011 and January 2013. Patients were followed up at baseline and at 7 days, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. Ocular symptom scores (Ocular Surface Disease Index, OSDI) and tear film function including tear film stability (tear film break-up time, TBUT), corneal epithelium integrity (corneal fluorescein staining, CFS), and tear secretion (Schirmer's I test, SIT) were evaluated. Results: In total, 83.9% of the diabetic patients (146 cases with 185 eyes) and 89.0% of the nondiabetic patients (422 cases with 463 eyes) completed all check-ups after the interventions (P = 0.095). The incidence of DES was 17.1% in the diabetic patients and 8.1% in the nondiabetic patients at 7 days after cataract surgery. In the diabetic patients, the incidence of DES remained 4.8% at 1 month postoperatively and decreased to zero at 3 months after surgery. No DES was diagnosed in nondiabetic patients at either the 1-month or 3-month follow-up. Compared with the baseline, the diabetic patients had worse symptom scores and lower TBUT values at 7 days and 1 month but not at 3 months postoperatively. In the nondiabetic patients, symptom scores and TBUT values had returned to preoperative levels at 1-month check-up. CFS scores and SIT values did not change significantly postoperatively in either group (P = 0.916 and P = 0.964, respectively). Conclusions Diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery are prone to DES. Ocular symptoms and tear film stability are transiently worsened in diabetic patients and are restored more slowly than those in nondiabetic patients. © 2016 Jiang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Source


Qian Y.,Fudan University | Qian Y.,Key Laboratory of Myopia of State Health Ministry | Huang J.,Fudan University | Huang J.,Key Laboratory of Myopia of State Health Ministry | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Refractive Surgery | Year: 2015

PURPOSE: To evaluate corneal power distribution using the ray tracing method (corneal power) in eyes undergoing small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) surgery and compare the functional optical zone with two lenticular sizes. METHODS: This retrospective study evaluated 128 patients who underwent SMILE for the correction of myopia and astigmatism with a lenticular diameter of 6.5 mm (the 6.5-mm group) and 6.2 mm (the 6.2-mm group). The data include refraction, correction, and corneal power obtained via a Scheimpflug camera from the pupil center to 8 mm. The surgically induced changes in corneal power (Δcorneal power) were compared to correction and Δrefraction. The functional optical zone was defined as the largest ring diameter when the difference between the ring power and the pupil center power was 1.50 diopters or less. The functional optical zone was compared between two lenticular diameter groups. RESULTS: Corneal power distribution was measured by the ray tracing method. In the 6.5-mm group (n = 100), Δcorneal power at 5 mm showed the smallest difference from Δrefraction and Δcorneal power at 0 mm exhibited the smallest difference from correction. In the 6.2-mm group (n = 28), Δcorneal power at 2 mm displayed the lowest dissimilarity from Δrefraction and Δcorneal power at 4 mm demonstrated the lowest dissimilarity from correction. There was no significant difference between the mean postoperative functional optical zones in either group when their spherical equivalents were matched. CONCLUSIONS: Total corneal refactive power can be used in the evaluation of surgically induced changes following SMILE. A lenticular diameter of 6.2 mm should be recommended for patients with high myopia because there is no functional difference in the optical zone. Source


Qian Y.,Fudan University | Qian Y.,Key Laboratory of Myopia of State Health Ministry | Huang J.,Fudan University | Huang J.,Key Laboratory of Myopia of State Health Ministry | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery | Year: 2014

Purpose To assess the influence of the origin of astigmatism on the correction of myopic astigmatism by laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy (LASEK). Setting Ophthalmology Department, Eye and ENT Hospital, Shanghai, China. Design Prospective study. Methods Patients having LASEK to correct myopia or myopic astigmatism were divided into 2 groups according to their ocular residual astigmatism (ORA). Patients were examined preoperatively and 1 and 3 months postoperatively. The efficacy of LASEK was compared between those with and those without a significant amount of intraocular astigmatism. Results The study comprised 54 eyes of 54 patients. The mean index of success (ratio of magnitude of remaining uncorrected astigmatism to that of initial preoperative astigmatism) in the high ORA group (n = 21) and low ORA group (n = 33) was 0.85 and 0.48, respectively, 1 month after surgery (t = 2.17, P =.04) and 0.88 and 0.32, respectively, 3 months after surgery (t = 2.18, P =.04). The Zernike coefficient of horizontal coma, Z(3,+1), increased more after surgery in the high ORA group than in the low ORA group (1 month versus preoperative, t = 2.32, P =.024; 3 months versus preoperative, t = 2.07, P =.048). Conclusions Nine percent and 2% of the eyes had minimal corneal haze at 1 month and 3 months, respectively. Laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy was less effective in correcting myopic astigmatism when astigmatism was mainly located at the internal optics. Horizontal coma increased more after LASEK in patients with higher ORA. Financial Disclosure No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Source


Qian Y.-S.,Fudan University | Qian Y.-S.,Key Laboratory of Myopia of State Health Ministry | Huang J.,Fudan University | Huang J.,Key Laboratory of Myopia of State Health Ministry | And 9 more authors.
Journal of Refractive Surgery | Year: 2011

PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of the origin of astigmatism on the correction of myopic astigmatism by LASIK. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted of the records of 192 patients (192 eyes) undergoing LASIK for correction of myopia and myopic astigmatism from January to September 2010. Ocular residual astigmatism (ORA) and lenticular astigmatism (LA) were determined by vector analysis using objective refraction and Pentacam (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH) imaging of both corneal surfaces. Patients were divided into two groups according to ORA (high ORA group: ORA/preoperative refractive astigmatism >1; normal ORA group: ORA/preoperative refractive astigmatism ≤1) and LA (high LA group: LA/preoperative refractive astigmatism >1; normal LA group: LA/preoperative refractive astigmatism ≤1). Procedural efficacy was compared between those eyes with and without a significant amount of internal optical astigmatism using index of success. RESULTS: Mean preoperative vectors for the astigmatism of the anterior cornea, posterior cornea, and lens were -1.33×3.0°, -0.33×95.3°, and -0.27×103.3°, respectively. Mean indices of success in the high and low ORA groups were 1.75 and 0.59, respectively (t=7.81, P<.001). Mean indices of success in the high and low LA groups were 2.07 and 0.70, respectively (t=12.36, P<.001). The higher indices of success in the high ORA and high LA groups suggest a lower efficacy of LASIK in treating astigmatism primarily located intraocularly. CONCLUSIONS: Myopic LASIK is less effective in correcting astigmatism when astigmatism is mainly located at the internal optics. Topography and refractive value should be incorporated in the treatment of patients when a significant amount of internal optical astigmatism is detected preoperatively. Copyright © SLACK Incorporated. Source


Qian Y.,Fudan University | Qian Y.,Key Laboratory of Myopia of State Health Ministry | Huang J.,Fudan University | Huang J.,Key Laboratory of Myopia of State Health Ministry | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery | Year: 2015

Purpose To compare the efficacy of correcting myopic astigmatism with femtosecond laser small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE, Carl Zeiss Meditec AG) versus laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy (LASEK). Setting The study was conducted at the Ophthalmology Department, Eye and ENT Hospital, Shanghai, China. Design A retrospective, cross-sectional study. Methods This study included patients who underwent small-incision lenticule extraction or LASEK for the correction of myopia and myopic astigmatism. Preoperative and 6-month postoperative astigmatism values were analyzed. The efficacies of the 2 surgeries to correct astigmatism were compared. Results A total of 180 right eyes of 180 patients (small-incision lenticule extraction: n = 113, LASEK: n = 67) were included. No significant difference was found between the 2 groups in the preoperative astigmatism (small-incision lenticule extraction: 1.16 ± 0.85D, LASEK: 1.16 ± 0.83D, P > .05) or the postoperative astigmatism (small-incision lenticule extraction: 0.35 ± 0.37D; LASEK: 0.31 ± 0.42D, P > .05), determined by manifest refraction. No significant difference was found between the 2 groups in surgically induced astigmatism vector (small-incision lenticule extraction: 1.13 ± 0.83D, LASEK: 1.01 ± 0.65D, P > .05). The correction index was higher for the small-incision lenticule extraction group (1.05 ± 0.53) than for the LASEK group (0.95 ± 0.21, P = .045). The postoperative astigmatism was significantly higher for the small-incision lenticule extraction group when the preoperative astigmatism was 1.0 D or less (small-incision lenticule extraction: 0.26 ± 0.30D, LASEK: 0.12 ± 0.20D, P = .007) and lower for the small-incision lenticule extraction group when the preoperative astigmatism was more than 2.0 D (small-incision lenticule extraction: 0.48 ± 0.37D, LASEK: 0.89 ± 0.46D, P = .002). Conclusions An adjustment of nomograms for correcting low astigmatism (≤1.0 D) by small-incision lenticule extraction is suggested due to the tendency toward overcorrection, whereas a nomogram adjustment for tissue-saving ablation profile is needed for the correction of high astigmatism (>2.0 D) by LASEK due to the tendency toward undercorrection. © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Source

Discover hidden collaborations