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Hu W.,CAS Lanzhou Institute of Modern Physics | Hu W.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Hu W.,Key laboratory of Microbial Resources Exploition and Application | Liu J.,CAS Lanzhou Institute of Modern Physics | And 11 more authors.
Journal of Zhejiang University: Science B | Year: 2014

The properties of the screened mutants for hyper-production of citric acid induced by carbon (12C6+) ion beams and X-ray irradiation were investigated in our current study. Among these mutants, mutant H4002 screened from 12C6+ ion irradiation had a higher yield of citric acid production than the parental strain in a 250-ml shaking flash. These expanded submerged experiments in a bioreactor were also carried out for mutant H4002. The results showed that (177.7–196.0) g/L citric acid was accumulated by H4002 through exploiting corn meal hydrolysate (containing initial 200.0–235.7 g/L sugar) with the productivity of (2.96–3.27) g/(L·h). This was especially true when the initial sugar concentration was 210 g/L, and the best economical citric acid production reached (187.5±0.7) g/L with a productivity of 3.13 g/(L·h). It was observed that mutant H4002 can utilize low-cost corn meal as a feedstock to efficiently produce citric acid. These results imply that the H4002 strain has the industrial production potentiality for citric acid and offers strong competition for the citric acid industry. © 2014, Zhejiang University and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Cao G.,Chinese Academy of Sciences | Cao G.,Lanzhou University | Cao G.,Key laboratory of Microbial Resources Exploition and Application | Zhang M.,Chinese Academy of Sciences | And 12 more authors.
Journal of Radiation Research | Year: 2015

Saccharomyces cerevisiae has served as a eukaryotic model in radiation biology studies of cellular responses to ionizing radiation (IR). Research in this field has thus far mainly been focused on DNA strand breaks, DNA base damage, or inhibition of protein activity. However, the effects of IR on S. cerevisiae cell membranes have barely been studied. Here, we investigated the changes in the permeability and integrity of S. cerevisiae cell membranes induced by high-linear energy transfer carbon ion (CI) beam or low-linear energy transfer X-ray. After CI exposure, protein elution and nucleotide diffusion were more pronounced than after X-ray treatment at the same doses, although these features were most prevalent following irradiation doses of 25-175 Gy. Flow cytometry of forward scatter light versus side scatter light and double-staining with fluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide showed that CI and X-ray irradiation significantly affected S. cerevisiae cell membrane integrity and cellular enzyme activity compared with untreated control cells. The extent of lesions in CI-irradiated cells, which exhibited markedly altered morphology and size, was greater than that in X-ray-irradiated cells. The relationships between permeabilized cells, esterase activity, and non-viable cell numbers furthermore indicated that irradiation-induced increases in cell permeabilization and decreases in esterase activity are dependent on the type of radiation and that these parameters correspond well with cell viability. These results also indicate that the patterns of cell inactivity due to X-ray or CI irradiation may be similar in terms of cell membrane damage. © The Author 2015. Source


Hu W.,CAS Lanzhou Institute of Modern Physics | Hu W.,Key laboratory of Microbial Resources Exploition and Application | Chen J.-H.,CAS Lanzhou Institute of Modern Physics | Chen J.-H.,Key laboratory of Microbial Resources Exploition and Application | And 9 more authors.
Journal of Zhejiang University: Science B | Year: 2016

The objective of this work was to produce citric acid from corn starch using a newly isolated mutant of Aspergillus niger, and to analyze the relationship between changes in the physiological properties of A. niger induced by carbon ion irradiation and citric acid accumulation. Our results showed that the physiological characteristics of conidia in A. niger were closely related to citric acid accumulation and that lower growth rate and viability of conidia may be beneficial to citric acid accumulation. Using corn starch as a raw material, a high-yielding citric acid mutant, named HW2, was obtained. In a 10-L bioreactor, HW2 can accumulate 118.9 g/L citric acid with a residual total sugar concentration of only 14.4 g/L. This represented an 18% increase in citric acid accumulation and a 12.5% decrease in sugar utilization compared with the original strain. © 2016, Zhejiang University and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source

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