Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of the Ministry of Health of China

Hangzhou, China

Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of the Ministry of Health of China

Hangzhou, China
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Chen C.,Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of The Ministry of Health of China | Li H.-Q.,Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of The Ministry of Health of China | Liu Y.-J.,Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of The Ministry of Health of China | Guo Z.-F.,Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of The Ministry of Health of China | And 12 more authors.
Journal of Neuroscience | Year: 2015

Microglia are the resident immune cells in the CNS and play diverse roles in the maintenance of CNS homeostasis. Recent studies have shown that microglia continually survey the CNS microenvironment and scavenge cell debris and aberrant proteins by phagocytosis and pinocytosis, and that reactive microglia are capable to present antigens to T cells and initiate immune responses. However, how microglia process the endocytosed contents and evoke an immune response remain unclear. Here we report that a size-dependent selective transport of small soluble contents from the pinosomal lumen into lysosomes is critical for the antigen processing in microglia. Using fluorescent probes and water-soluble magnetic nanobeads of defined sizes, we showed in cultured rodent microglia, and in a cell-free reconstructed system that pinocytosed proteins become degraded immediately following pinocytosis and the resulting peptides are selectively delivered to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) containing lysosomes, whereas undegraded proteins are retained in the pinosomal lumen. This early size-based sorting of pinosomal contents relied on the formation of transient tunnel between pinosomes and lysosomes in a Rab7- and dynamin II-dependent manner, which allowed the small contents to pass through but restricted large ones. Inhibition of the size-based sorting markedly reduced proliferation and cytokine release of cocultured CD4+ T cells, indicating that the size-based sorting is required for efficient antigen presentation by microglial cells. Together, these findings reveal a novel early sorting mechanism for pinosomal luminal contents in microglial cells, which may explain how microglia efficiently process protein antigens and evoke an immune response. © 2015 the authors.


Gang Y.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | Liu X.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | Wang X.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | Zhang Q.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | And 9 more authors.
Biomedical Optics Express | Year: 2017

High-resolution three-dimensional biomolecule distribution information of large samples is essential to understanding their biological structure and function. Here, we proposed a method combining large sample resin embedding with iDISCO immunofluorescence staining to acquire the profile of biomolecules with high spatial resolution. We evaluated the compatibility of plastic embedding with an iDISCO staining technique and found that the fluorophores and the neuronal fine structures could be well preserved in the Lowicryl HM20 resin, and that numerous antibodies and fluorescent tracers worked well upon Lowicryl HM20 resin embedding. Further, using fluorescence Micro-Optical sectioning tomography (fMOST) technology combined with ultra-thin slicing and imaging, we were able to image the immunolabeled large-volume tissues with high resolution. © 2017 Optical Society of America.


Yan H.,Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of the Ministry of Health of China | Zhang X.,Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of the Ministry of Health of China | Zhang X.,Zhejiang University | Hu W.,Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of the Ministry of Health of China | And 15 more authors.
Nature Communications | Year: 2014

The role of the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) in cerebral ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury remains unknown. Here we show that H3R expression is upregulated after I/R in two mouse models. H3R antagonists and H3R knockout attenuate I/R injury, which is reversed by an H3R-selective agonist. Interestingly, H1R and H2R antagonists, a histidine decarboxylase (HDC) inhibitor and HDC knockout all fail to compromise the protection by H3R blockade. H3R blockade inhibits mTOR phosphorylation and reinforces autophagy. The neuroprotection by H3R antagonism is reversed by 3-methyladenine and siRNA for Atg7, and is diminished in Atg5-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Furthermore, the peptide Tat-H3RCT414-436, which blocks CLIC4 binding with H3Rs, or siRNA for CLIC4, further increases I/R-induced autophagy and protects against I/R injury. Therefore, H3R promotes I/R injury while its antagonism protects against ischaemic injury via histamine-independent mechanisms that involve suppressing H3R/CLIC4 binding-activated autophagy, suggesting that H3R inhibition is a therapeutic target for cerebral ischaemia. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Zhang X.,Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of the Ministry of Health of China | Yan H.,Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of the Ministry of Health of China | Yuan Y.,Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of the Ministry of Health of China | Gao J.,Wenzhou Medical College | And 8 more authors.
Autophagy | Year: 2013

Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) is a complex pathological process. Although autophagy can be evoked by ischemia, its involvement in the reperfusion phase after ischemia and its contribution to the fate of neurons remains largely unknown. In the present investigation, we found that autophagy was activated in the reperfusion phase, as revealed in both mice with middle cerebral artery occlusion and oxygen-glucose deprived cortical neurons in culture. Interestingly, in contrast to that in permanent ischemia, inhibition of autophagy (by 3-methyladenine, bafilomycin A1, Atg7 knockdown or in atg5-/- MEF cells) in the reperfusion phase reinforced, rather than reduced, the brain and cell injury induced by I-R. Inhibition of autophagy either with 3-methyladenine or Atg7 knockdown enhanced the I-R-induced release of cytochrome c and the downstream activation of apoptosis. Moreover, MitoTracker Red-labeled neuronal mitochondria increasingly overlapped with GFP-LC3-labeled autophagosomes during reperfusion, suggesting the presence of mitophagy. The mitochondrial clearance in I-R was reversed by 3-methyladenine and Atg7 silencing, further suggesting that mitophagy underlies the neuroprotection by autophagy. In support, administration of the mitophagy inhibitor mdivi-1 in the reperfusion phase aggravated the ischemia-induced neuronal injury both in vivo and in vitro. PARK2 translocated to mitochondria during reperfusion and Park2 knockdown aggravated ischemia-induced neuronal cell death. In conclusion, the results indicated that autophagy plays different roles in cerebral ischemia and subsequent reperfusion. The protective role of autophagy during reperfusion may be attributable to mitophagy-related mitochondrial clearance and inhibition of downstream apoptosis. PARK2 may be involved in the mitophagy process. © 2013 Landes Bioscience.

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