Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes

Nanjing, China

Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes

Nanjing, China

Time filter

Source Type

Wu Q.-L.,Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes | Rui Q.,Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes | He K.-W.,Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes | Shen L.-L.,Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes | Wang D.-Y.,Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes
Neuroscience Bulletin | Year: 2010

To investigate whether genes required for synaptogenesis and synaptic function are also involved in fat storage control in Caenorhabditis elegans. Methods Fat storage was examined in mutants of genes affecting the synaptogenesis and synaptic function. In addition, the genetic interactions of SNAREs syntaxin/unc-64 and SNAP-25/ric-4 with daf-2, daf-7, nhr-49, sbp-1 and mdt-15 in regulating fat storage were further investigated. The tissue-specific activities of unc-64 and ric-4 were investigated to study the roles of unc-64 and ric-4 in regulating fat storage in the nervous system and/or the intestine. Results Mutations of genes required for the formation of presynaptic neurotransmission site did not obviously influence fat storage. However, among the genes required for synaptic function, the plasma membrane-associated SNAREs syntaxin/unc-64 and SNAP-25/ric-4 genes were involved in the fat storage control. Fat storage in the intestinal cells was dramatically increased in unc-64 and ric-4 mutants as revealed by Sudan Black and Nile Red strainings, although the fat droplet size was not significantly changed. Moreover, in both the nervous system and the intestine, expression of unc-64 significantly inhibited the increase in fat storage observed in unc-64 mutant. And expression of ric-4 in the nervous system completely restored fat storage in ric-4 mutant. Genetic interaction assay further indicated that both unc-64 and ric-4 regulated fat storage independently of daf-2 [encoding an insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) receptor], daf-7 [encoding a transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) ligand], and nhr-49 (encoding a nuclear hormone receptor). Besides, mutation of daf-16 did not obviously affect the phenotype of increased fat storage in unc-64 or ric-4 mutant. Furthermore, unc-64 and ric-4 regulated fat storage probably through the ARC105/mdt-15- and SREBP/sbp-1-mediated signaling pathways. In addition, fat storage in unc-64; ric-4 was higher than that in either unc-64 or ric-4 single mutant nematodes, suggesting that unc-64 functions in parallel with ric-4 in regulating fat storage. Conclusion The plasma membrane-associated SNAREs syntaxin/unc-64 and SNAP-25/ric-4 function in parallel in regulating fat storage in C. elegans, probably through the ARC105/mdt-15-and SREBP/sbp-1-mediated signaling pathways. © Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010.


Shen L.-L.,Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes | Du M.,Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes | Lin X.-F.,Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes | Cai T.,Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes | Wang D.-Y.,Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes
Neuroscience Bulletin | Year: 2010

To investigate the interaction between the genes required for the functions of AWA olfactory neuron and insulin/IGF signaling in regulating the longevity of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Methods The mutants that had loss-of-function mutation of the genes required for AWA, AWC, ASE, and AFD sensory neurons were employed. Lifespan, the speed of pharynx pumping, the intestinal autofluorescence, the dauer formation, and the brood size were examined. Rescue experiments were performed to confirm the role of the genes required for the functions of AWA neuron in regulating lifespan. Moreover, genetic interactions between genes required for the functions of AWA neuron and insulin/ IGF signaling were investigated. Results Mutations of odr-7, odr-2, and odr-3 genes required for the functions of AWA neuron significantly increased the mean lifespan of nematodes and slowed the accumulation of intestinal autofluorescence. Besides, these mutations were closely associated with higher pumping rates during aging. However, mutation of odr-7, odr- 2, or odr-3 did not obviously affect the brood size or the dauer formation, and the regulation of longevity by odr-7, odr-2, and odr-3 was temperature-independent. In contrast, mutations of genes required for the functions of ASE, AWC, and AFD sensory neurons did not influence the nematode lifespan. Moreover, expression of odr-7, odr-2 and odr-3 in AWA neuron could completely or largely restore the altered lifespan in odr-7, odr-2 and odr-3 mutants. Furthermore, genetic interaction assay demonstrated that the extended lifespan in odr-7 mutant could be suppressed by daf-16 mutation and enhanced by daf- 2 or age-1 mutation, whereas mev-1 and pha-4 were not required for the long lifespan of odr-7 mutant. Conclusion The genes required for the function of AWA sensory neuron could regulate the nematode longevity in an insulin/IGF signaling-dependent fashion in C. elegans. © Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010.

Loading Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes collaborators
Loading Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes collaborators