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Chen D.,Yangzhou University | Chen D.,Key Laboratory of Dairy Biotechnology and Safety Control | Yang Z.,Yangzhou University | Yang Z.,Key Laboratory of Dairy Biotechnology and Safety Control | And 14 more authors.
Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology | Year: 2015

Accumulating evidence indicates that lactic acid bacteria could improve host physiology and lipid metabolism. To investigate the effect of the gut microbiota on host lipid metabolism, a hyperlipidemic rat model was established by feeding rats a high-fat diet for 28 days, and the gut microbiota of the rats was analyzed using real-time PCR before and after administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus hsryfm 1301 and its fermented milk for 28 days. The findings showed that the Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Bacteroides spp., and Enterococcus spp. content in the hyperlipidemic rats gut was increased significantly (p < 0.05), while the Clostridium leptum and Enterobacter spp. content was decreased significantly after intervening with L. rhamnosus hrsyfm 1301 and its fermented milk for 28 days (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the lipid levels of the serum and the liver were decreased significantly (p < 0.05) and the fecal water content was increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the hyperlipidemic rats after the intervention, and hepatocyte fatty degeneration of liver tissues was also prevented. A positive correlation was observed between the Clostridium leptum content and the level of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein, and a negative correlation was observed between the Enterobacter spp. content and the Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. content in the hyperlipidemic rats gut. These results suggest that the gut microbiota and lipid metabolism of hyperlipidemic rats could be improved by supplementation with L. rhamnosus hsryfm 1301 and its fermented milk. © 2015 by The Korean Society for Microbiology and Biotechnology. Source


Chen D.,Yangzhou University | Chen D.,Key Laboratory of Dairy Biotechnology and Safety Control | Yang Z.,Yangzhou University | Yang Z.,Key Laboratory of Dairy Biotechnology and Safety Control | And 18 more authors.
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine | Year: 2014

Background: Growing evidence indicates that intestinal microbiota regulate our metabolism. Probiotics confer health benefits that may depend on their ability to affect the gut microbiota. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of supplementation with the probiotic strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus hsryfm 1301, on the gut microbiota in a hyperlipidemic rat model, and to explore the associations between the gut microbiota and the serum lipids.Methods: The hyperlipidemic rat model was established by feeding rats a high-fat diet for 28 d. The rats' gut microbiota were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing before and after L. rhamnosus hsryfm 1301 supplementation or its fermented milk for 28 d. The serum lipids level was also tested.Results: The rats' primary gut microbiota were composed of Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes and Verrucomicrobia. The abundance and diversity of the gut microbiota generally decreased after feeding with a high-fat diet, with a significant decrease in the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes, but with an increase in that of Firmicutes (P < 0.05). Administration of L. rhamnosus hsryfm 1301 or its fermented milk for 28 d, could recover the Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia abundance and could decrease the Firmicutes abundance, which was associated with a significant reduction in the serum lipids' level in the hyperlipidemic rats with high-fat diet induced. The abundance of 22 genera of gut bacteria was changed significantly after probiotic intervention for 28 d (P < 0.05). A positive correlation was observed between Ruminococcus spp. and serum triglycerides, Dorea spp. and serum cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), and Enterococcus spp. and high-density lipoprotein. The Butyrivibrio spp. negatively correlated with TC and LDL-C.Conclusions: Our results suggest that the lipid metabolism of hyperlipidemic rats was improved by regulating the gut microbiota with supplementation of L.rhamnosus hsryfm 1301 or its fermented milk for 28 d. © 2014 Chen et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source

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