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Guo Z.,Jiangnan University | Liu X.-M.,Jiangnan University | Zhang Q.-X.,Jiangnan University | Tian F.-W.,Jiangnan University | And 3 more authors.
Clinical Lipidology | Year: 2012

Inulin has been shown to be an effective therapeutic for reducing total serum cholesterol and triglycerides in clinical trials with modest sample sizes. A systematic literature search of several databases was conducted for studies that investigated the efficacy of inulin on the plasma lipid profile of subjects. A random-effects model was used to calculate the weighted mean difference and 95% CI as the difference between the mean for the inulin and control groups. The pooled mean net changes in total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C and triglycerides of hyperlipidemic and normolipidemic subjects with inulin compared with controls were calculated. The results indicate that a diet rich in inulin has beneficial effects on total cholesterol and LDL-C, as well as triglyceride concentration in the plasma of hyperlipidemic subjects, and has no effects on plasma lipids in normolipidemic subjects. © 2012 Future Medicine Ltd. Source


Zhuang G.,Jiangnan University | Liu X.-M.,Jiangnan University | Zhang Q.-X.,Jiangnan University | Tian F.-W.,Jiangnan University | And 3 more authors.
Clinical Lipidology | Year: 2012

Probiotics are living microorganisms that, upon ingestion in high amounts, exert health effects beyond inherent basic nutrition. To date, some studies have shown that dietary intake of probiotics is effective at lowering plasma cholesterol. The aim of this article is to summarize the current knowledge on the underlying mechanism(s) that affect(s) the cholesterol-lowering action of probiotics. The accepted mechanism responsible for the cholesterol-lowering effect of probiotics is the inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption and the suppression of bile acid reabsorption. Recent research has indicated that several sites within the cholesterol metabolism, such as the NPC1L1 protein, 3hydroxy3methylglutarylCoA reductase and 7α and 27αhydroxylase, have been suggested where regulation may take place after oral administration of probiotics, but these mechanisms are still imperfectly understood. Human metagenomic studies examining the possible mechanisms by which probiotic ingestion can be used to treat hypercholesterolemia should be carried out in the future. © 2012 Future Medicine Ltd. Source


Li H.,Tianjin University of Commerce | Lu M.,Tianjin University of Commerce | Guo H.,Tianjin University of Commerce | Li W.,Tianjin University of Commerce | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Food Protection | Year: 2010

The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of sucrose at 2.0,4.0, and 8.0% as a protectant during freezedrying on the viability and membrane properties of Lactobacillus casei Zhang. Membrane properties were determined using zeta potential, hydrophobicity, fluidity, and integrity before and after freeze-drying. Exposing L. casei Zhang to sucrose protected it from drastic changes in cell surface electrophoretic mobility and hydrophobicity in contrast with the untreated condition, and the effect was dose related. Sucrose caused an increase in membrane fluidity compared with the control sample. Moreover, 2.0% sucrose decreased the general polarization values less than 4.0 or 8.0% sucrose, while 4.0% sucrose and 8.0% sucrose had no significant difference in decreasing general polarization values (P < 0.05). L. casei Zhang freeze-dried in the presence of 2.0% sucrose retained up to 23.7% membrane integrity, whereas cells freeze-dried with 4.0 and 8.0% sucrose had 32.4 and 37.6% membrane integrity compared with that of L. casei Zhang before freeze-drying. Correspondingly, the number of survivors of L. casei Zhang, determined by the plate count method, decreased from 8.02 to 0.63 log CFU/ml after freeze-drying in the absence of sucrose. However, in the presence of 2.0,4.0, and 8.0% sucrose, the numbers of survivors were 2.01, 2.87, and 3.20 log CFU/ml after freeze-drying, respectively. The present work suggested that sucrose was an effective membrane protectant at 2.0, 4.0, or 8.0% on the surface zeta potential, hydrophobicity, fluidity, and integrity of L. casei Zhang. Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection. Source


Wang L.,Key Laboratory of Dairy Biotechnology and Bioengineering | Wang L.,Inner Mongolia Agricultural University | Liu C.,Key Laboratory of Dairy Biotechnology and Bioengineering | Liu C.,Inner Mongolia Agricultural University | And 9 more authors.
International Immunopharmacology | Year: 2015

To investigate whether Lactobacillus plantarum P-8 may be used as an alternative to antibiotics in the broiler chicken diet, we compared P-8 and antibiotics for their immunobiotic properties and their effect on growth performance of broiler chickens in a 42-day trial. The results showed that P-8 provided similar benefits in weight gain, feed intake and feed efficiency as antibiotics did. Importantly, P-8 activated protective immune responses of the broilers while antibiotics lacked this effect. P-8 induced higher fecal secretory IgA (sIgA) levels on day 42 (P ≤ 0.027) and IgA+ lymphocytes in the jejunum and Peyer's patches (PP) (P < 0.001) compared to antibiotic treatment. Antibiotics reduced the IgA+ lymphocytes in jejunum and PP on day 42 compared to the control. P-8 increased CD3+ T cells in the small intestinal tissues in most test situations whereas antibiotics had fewer CD3+ cells in PP and cecal tonsil compared with the control broilers at the end of the trial. In addition, P-8 increased CD4+ T cells significantly in the intestinal tissues compared to both antibiotics and the control (P < 0.0052). Both Th1 and Th2 cytokine expression were enhanced by P-8 on day 14, consistent with the clinical trial results showing probiotic benefits in diseases. Antibiotics up- and down-regulated interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4 and IL-10 transcripts in an age-dependent manner, and showed anti-inflammatory potential. These data indicate that P-8 may provide protective immune response to broilers while maintaining similar growth performance and may be a potential alternative to antibiotics supplemented in chicken feeds. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Source


Guo Z.,Jiangnan University | Liu X.M.,Jiangnan University | Zhang Q.X.,Jiangnan University | Shen Z.,Sun Yat Sen University | And 5 more authors.
Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases | Year: 2011

Aims: Human clinical studies have yielded mixed results on the effects of consumption of probiotics on the plasma lipid profile. We conducted a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials that evaluated the effects of probiotics consumption on blood lipids. Data Synthesis: A systematic literature search of Embase, Web of Science, PubMed and Cochrane Controlled Trials Registry was conducted for studies that investigated the efficacy of probiotics on the plasma lipid profile of subjects. With the help of Review Manager 4.2, data from 13 trials, which included 485 participants with high, borderline high and normal cholesterol levels, were examined. The pooled mean net change in total cholesterol for those treated with probiotics compared to controls was -6.40 mg dl -1 (95% confidence interval (CI), -9.93 to -2.87), mean net change in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol was -4.90 mg dl -1 (95% CI, -7.91 to -1.90), mean net change in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was -0.11 mg dl -1 (95% CI, -1.90-1.69) and mean net change in triglycerides was -3.95 mg dl -1 (95% CI, -10.32-2.42). Conclusion: These results indicate that a diet rich in probiotics decreases total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol concentration in plasma for participants with high, borderline high and normal cholesterol levels. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. Source

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