Shanghai Key Laboratory of Childrens Environmental Health

Shanghai, China

Shanghai Key Laboratory of Childrens Environmental Health

Shanghai, China
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Huang Y.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Huang Y.,Shanghai Institute of Pediatric Research | Ye T.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Liu C.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Biosciences | Year: 2017

We investigated whether maternal over-nutrition during pregnancy and lactation affects the offspring’s lipid metabolism at weaning by assessing liver lipid metabolic gene expressions and analysing its mechanisms on the development of metabolic abnormalities. Female Sprague–Dawley rats were fed with standard chow diet (CON) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks, and then continued feeding during gestation and lactation. The offspring whose dams were fed with HFD had a lower birth weight but an increased body weight with impaired glucose tolerance, higher serum cholesterol, and hepatic steatosis at weaning. Microarray analyses showed that there were 120 genes differently expressed between the two groups. We further verified the results by qRT-PCR. Significant increase of the lipogenesis (Me1, Scd1) gene expression was found in HFD (P<0.05), and up-regulated expression of genes (PPAR-α, Cpt1α, Ehhadh) involved in β-oxidation was also observed (P<0.05), but the Acsl3 gene was down-regulated (P<0.05). Maternal over-nutrition could not only primarily induce lipogenesis, but also promote lipolysis through an oxidation pathway as compensation, eventually leading to an increased body weight, impaired glucose tolerance, elevated serum cholesterol and hepatic steatosis at weaning. This finding may provide some evidence for a healthy maternal diet in order to reduce the risk of metabolic diseases in the early life of the offspring. © 2017 Indian Academy of Sciences


Li S.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Zhu S.,Zhejiang University | Jin X.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Yan C.,Shanghai Key Laboratory of Childrens Environmental Health | And 3 more authors.
Sleep Medicine | Year: 2010

Objectives: To examine risk factors regarding short sleep duration among Chinese school-aged children. Methods: A random sample of 20,778 children aged around 5-11 years participated in a cross-sectional survey, which was conducted in eight cities of China in 2005. A parent-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on children's sleep duration and possible related factors from eight domains. Short sleep duration was defined as total sleep duration <9 h per day. Results: In all, 28.3% of the sampled children slept <9 h per day. The multivariate logistic regression identified, after adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic variables, factors associated with short sleep duration: more television viewing during weekdays (OR. = 1.21, p= 0.004), more frequent computer/internet using (OR. = 1.17, p= 0.006), earlier school starting time (OR. = 1.10, p= 0.020), more time on homework during weekdays (OR. = 1.66, p< 0.001) and weekends (OR. = 1.14, p= 0.001), poor bedtime hygiene (e.g., having drinks with caffeine after 6:00PM [OR. = 1.22, p< 0.001], doing exciting activities during bedtime [OR. = 1.16, p< 0.001], and irregular bedtime [OR. = 1.55, p< 0.001]), and shorter sleep duration of parents (mother: OR. = 1.31, p< 0.001 for sleep duration <6 h and OR. = 1.24, p= 0.006 for 6-8 h; father: OR. = 1.52, p< 0.001 for <6 h and OR. = 1.19, p< 0.001 for 6-8 h). Conclusions: Factors associated with sleep duration covered multidimensional domains among school-aged children. Compared to sleep environments and chronic health problems, school schedules, lifestyle patterns, and parents' sleep habits had greater impact on children's sleep duration, indicating the existing chronic sleep loss in school children could be, at least partly, intervened by reducing the use of visual technologies, by changing the school schedules, by improving the sleep hygiene routine, and by regulating parents' sleep habits. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Li S.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Li S.,Shanghai Key Laboratory of Childrens Environmental Health | Huang H.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Huang H.,Shanghai Key Laboratory of Childrens Environmental Health | And 5 more authors.
International Journal of STD and AIDS | Year: 2010

The effectiveness of a peer-led education intervention in HIV/AIDS prevention was assessed in the Chinese children of migrant workers. A prospective study was conducted in 12 junior high schools for migrant children. Among the intervention group, a peer-education-based HIV/AIDS prevention was implemented for three months. The results during the baseline survey indicated that the level of knowledge on HIV/AIDS was lower in children of migrant workers. After three months of peer-led intervention, compared with the control group, students in the intervention group positively increased their HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, modified their attitude and improved their protection self-efficacy. Compared with attitude, intervention was more effective in the improvement of knowledge and protection self-efficacy, especially knowledge. The findings suggest that peer-led education was an effective method in improving knowledge, attitude and protection self-efficacy in Chinese children of migrant workers. Heightened concerns targeting the group students were particularly necessary, given their lower level of related knowledge and vulnerability to HIV infection.


Li S.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Jin X.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Yan C.,Shanghai Key Laboratory of Childrens Environmental Health | Wu S.,Shanghai Key Laboratory of Childrens Environmental Health | And 2 more authors.
Respiratory Research | Year: 2010

Background: Habitual snoring, a prominent symptom of sleep-disordered breathing, is an important indicator for a number of health problems in children. Compared to adults, large epidemiological studies on childhood habitual snoring and associated predisposing factors are extremely scarce. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of habitual snoring among Chinese school-aged children.Methods: A random sample of 20,152 children aged 5.08 to 11.99 years old participated in a cross-sectional survey, which was conducted in eight cities of China. Parent-administrated questionnaires were used to collect information on children's snoring frequency and the possible correlates.Results: The prevalence of habitual snoring was 12.0% (14.5% for boys vs. 9.5% for girls) in our sampled children. Following factors were associated with an increased risk for habitual snoring: lower family income (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.46), lower father's education (OR = 1.38 and 1.14 for middle school or under and high school of educational level, respectively), breastfeeding duration < 6 months (OR = 1.17), pregnancy maternal smoking (OR = 1.51), obesity (OR = 1.50), overweight (OR = 1.35), several respiratory problems associated with atopy and infection, such as chronic/allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.94), asthma (OR = 1.43), adenotonsillar hypertrophy (OR = 2.17), and chronic otitis media (OR = 1.31), and family history of habitual snoring (OR = 1.70).Conclusion: The prevalence of habitual snoring in Chinese children was similar to that observed in other countries. The potential predisposing factors covered socioeconomic characteristics, environmental exposures, chronic health problems, and family susceptibility. Compared to socioeconomic status and family susceptibility, environmental exposures and chronic health problems had greater impact, indicating childhood habitual snoring could be partly prevented by health promotion and environmental intervention. © 2010 Li et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Jiang Y.R.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Jiang Y.R.,Shanghai Key Laboratory of Childrens Environmental Health | Spruyt K.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Chen W.J.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | And 14 more authors.
Journal of Public Health (United Kingdom) | Year: 2015

Background Short sleep duration has recently been found to be associated with obesity in children, but findings involving adolescents have been less consistent, and some have mentioned gender differences. Objectives To investigate the association between parent-reported sleep duration and adiposity in early adolescence (10-12 years old) and to explore gender differences within this population. Methods Participants were 1309 fifth-grade students (685 boys) from 10 primary schools in Shanghai, China. Body mass index (BMI), waist-height ratio (WHeR) and body fat percentage (BF%) were assessed. Sleep and other potential contributors were recorded by parents or self-reported. Results Compared with adolescents in the longest sleep group (greater than or equal to +1 SD, ≥10.05 h), those in the shortest sleep group (less than -1 SD, <8.89 h) had significantly higher BMI, WHeR and BF%. Sleep was found to be closely related to increased adiposity in girls who were in the shortest and shorter sleep group (


PubMed | Shanghai Key Laboratory of Childrens Environmental Health
Type: | Journal: Respiratory research | Year: 2010

Habitual snoring, a prominent symptom of sleep-disordered breathing, is an important indicator for a number of health problems in children. Compared to adults, large epidemiological studies on childhood habitual snoring and associated predisposing factors are extremely scarce. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of habitual snoring among Chinese school-aged children.A random sample of 20,152 children aged 5.08 to 11.99 years old participated in a cross-sectional survey, which was conducted in eight cities of China. Parent-administrated questionnaires were used to collect information on childrens snoring frequency and the possible correlates.The prevalence of habitual snoring was 12.0% (14.5% for boys vs. 9.5% for girls) in our sampled children. Following factors were associated with an increased risk for habitual snoring: lower family income (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.46), lower fathers education (OR = 1.38 and 1.14 for middle school or under and high school of educational level, respectively), breastfeeding duration < 6 months (OR = 1.17), pregnancy maternal smoking (OR = 1.51), obesity (OR = 1.50), overweight (OR = 1.35), several respiratory problems associated with atopy and infection, such as chronic/allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.94), asthma (OR = 1.43), adenotonsillar hypertrophy (OR = 2.17), and chronic otitis media (OR = 1.31), and family history of habitual snoring (OR = 1.70).The prevalence of habitual snoring in Chinese children was similar to that observed in other countries. The potential predisposing factors covered socioeconomic characteristics, environmental exposures, chronic health problems, and family susceptibility. Compared to socioeconomic status and family susceptibility, environmental exposures and chronic health problems had greater impact, indicating childhood habitual snoring could be partly prevented by health promotion and environmental intervention.

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