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Yu C.,Tianjin Huanhu Hospital | Yu C.,Key Laboratory of Cerebral Vascular Disease and Neurodegenerative Disease | An Z.,Tianjin Huanhu Hospital | An Z.,Key Laboratory of Cerebral Vascular Disease and Neurodegenerative Disease | And 11 more authors.
Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience | Year: 2015

Background: Although the age-specific incidence and mortality of stroke is higher among men, stroke has a greater clinical effect on women. However, the sex differences in stroke among elderly patients are unknown. Therefore, we aimed to assess the sex differences in stroke among elderly stroke patients. Methods: Between 2005 and 2013, we recruited 1484 consecutive acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients (=75 years old) from a specialized neurology hospital in Tianjin, China. Information regarding their stroke subtypes, severity, risk factors, and outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke were recorded. Results: Comparing with men, women had a significantly higher prevalence of severe stroke (17.20 vs. 12.54%), hypertension (76.42 vs. 66.39%), dyslipidemias (30.35 vs. 22.76%), and obesity (18.40 vs. 9.32%), P < 0.05. Comparing with women, men had a significantly higher prevalence of intracranial artery stenosis (23.11 vs. 17.45%), current smoking (29.60 vs. 13.05%), and alcohol consumption (12.15 vs. 0.47%), P < 0.05. Moreover, dependency was more common among women at 3 and 12 months after stroke, although the sex difference disappeared after adjusting for stroke subtypes, severity, and risk factors. Conclusion: Elderly women with AIS had more severe stroke status and worse outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke. Thus, elderly female post-AIS patients are a crucial population that should be assisted with controlling their risk factors for stroke and changing their lifestyle. © 2015 Yu, An, Zhao, Wang, Gao, Liu, Wang and Wu.


PubMed | Key Laboratory of Cerebral Vascular Disease and Neurodegenerative Disease and Tianjin Huanhu Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders extra | Year: 2014

Alzheimers disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia worldwide and is associated with individual, familial and social burdens. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) may have a prominent role in AD pathophysiology by affecting the metabolism of catecholamine neurotransmitters and estrogen. Although the COMT rs4680 gene polymorphism has been investigated as a susceptibility factor for AD, the results are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of the COMT rs4680 gene polymorphism as a risk factor for AD in the Han Chinese population and its synergistic effect with the apolipoprotein E (APOE)gene.A total of 137 AD patients and 194 healthy controls were analyzed. Clinical criteria and neuropsychological tests were used to establish diagnostic groups. All subjects were analyzed for the COMTrs4680 polymorphism and APOEgenotype.No significant differences were observed between AD and control subjects regarding the COMT genotype frequencies of Val/Val, Val/Met and Met/Met, but Met alleles were higher in AD than in control subjects (35.4 and 28.1%, p = 0.045). A minor synergistic effect between the genotypes GG and APOE4 was observed in AD patients (OR: 5.707, 95% CI: 2.505-13.002, p < 0.001). This synergistic effect was greater in women, who showed higher OR of AD (16.007, 95% CI: 4.606-56.118, p < 0.001) versus the AD group with APOE 4 (11.972, 95% CI: 5.534-25.902, p < 0.001). Furthermore, the COMT Met allele was an independent risk factor for AD without APOE 4 allele carriers (OR: 1.806, 95% CI: 1.160-2.810, p = 0.009), especially in men (OR: 4.904, 95% CI: 2.381-10.099, p < 0.001).The COMT(Val158Met) polymorphism is not an independent risk factor for AD but shows a synergistic effect between the genotypes GG and APOE4 that proves greater in women with AD. The COMT Met allele represents a risk factor in AD without APOE 4 allele carriers, which is notable in men with AD.

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