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Li C.-B.,Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodelling and Function Research | Li C.-B.,Shandong University | Li X.-X.,Shandong University | Chen Y.-G.,Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodelling and Function Research | And 7 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology | Year: 2012

Insulin resistance (IR) is crucially involved in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome (MS). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of simvastatin on IR in rats with MS. A rat model of MS was established and myocardial damage was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Twenty-two MS rats were divided into two groups of 11 rats each: (i) an MS group; and (ii) a simvastatin-treated MS. Ten Wistar rats were used as controls. The phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT-1), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and Akt were analysed by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Insulin resistance-induced MS was associated with a significant increase in Rho kinase (ROCK) activity and inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/Akt pathway. Decreased levels of phosphorylated (p-) MYPT-1 and p-IRS-1 (Ser307) and increased levels of p-Akt were found in hearts from the MS + simvastatin compared with the MS group. These results suggest that simvastatin reduces ROCK activity and increases Akt activity. Simvastatin exerts cardioprotective effects and improves IR, which can be attributed, at least in part, to the inhibition of ROCK and activation of PI3-K/Akt. © 2012 The Authors Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.


Hao P.-P.,Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodelling and Function Research | Chen Y.-G.,Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodelling and Function Research | Wang J.-L.,Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodelling and Function Research | Ji W.-Q.,Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodelling and Function Research | And 4 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology | Year: 2010

Summary 1. There is considerable evidence regarding the efficacy of statins for the primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, due to lack of sufficient evidence, there is still doubt whether high-dose statin therapy prior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is beneficial. In the present study, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of preoperative high-dose statin therapy on the incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) after successful PCI. 2. Trials were retrieved through Medline (1980-2009) and the reference files limited to English-language articles. Data were abstracted using a standardized protocol and a meta-analysis was performed. 3. Five studies of a total 1789 patients with CAD qualified for analysis. Administration of high-dose statins in CAD patients before PCI was associated with a significant reduction in MACE 30 days after the procedure. The incidence of MACE in the high-dose statin group (6.98%) was significantly lower than that in the placebo group (14.77%), with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.43 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31-0.59; P < 0.00001). The incidence of post-PCI increases in creatine kinase MB in the high-dose statin and placebo groups was 9.20%vs 18.83%, respectively (OR 0.43; 95% CI 0.33-0.58; P < 0.00001), whereas the incidence of increases in troponin I was 30.13%vs 44.53%, respectively (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.43-0.67; P < 0.00001), respectively. 4. In conclusion, high-dose statin therapy before PCI provides a significant benefit over placebo in preventing post-PCI MACE. Findings from the present analysis strongly support a strategy of routine loading of high-dose statins before interventional therapy. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.


PubMed | Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodelling and Function Research
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology | Year: 2010

1. There is considerable evidence regarding the efficacy of statins for the primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, due to lack of sufficient evidence, there is still doubt whether high-dose statin therapy prior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is beneficial. In the present study, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of preoperative high-dose statin therapy on the incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) after successful PCI. 2. Trials were retrieved through Medline (1980-2009) and the reference files limited to English-language articles. Data were abstracted using a standardized protocol and a meta-analysis was performed. 3. Five studies of a total 1789 patients with CAD qualified for analysis. Administration of high-dose statins in CAD patients before PCI was associated with a significant reduction in MACE 30 days after the procedure. The incidence of MACE in the high-dose statin group (6.98%) was significantly lower than that in the placebo group (14.77%), with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.43 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31-0.59; P < 0.00001). The incidence of post-PCI increases in creatine kinase MB in the high-dose statin and placebo groups was 9.20%vs 18.83%, respectively (OR 0.43; 95% CI 0.33-0.58; P < 0.00001), whereas the incidence of increases in troponin I was 30.13%vs 44.53%, respectively (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.43-0.67; P < 0.00001), respectively. 4. In conclusion, high-dose statin therapy before PCI provides a significant benefit over placebo in preventing post-PCI MACE. Findings from the present analysis strongly support a strategy of routine loading of high-dose statins before interventional therapy.

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