Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education

Chengdu, China

Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education

Chengdu, China
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Liu G.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Liu G.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | Cao W.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Cao W.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | And 11 more authors.
Nutrients | Year: 2016

Glutamine and N-carbamylglutamate can enhance growth performance and health in animals, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of glutamine and N-carbamylglutamate supplementation in rat metabolism. Thirty rats were fed a control, glutamine, or N-carbamylglutamate diet for four weeks. Urine samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics, specifically high-resolution1H NMR metabolic profiling combined with multivariate data analysis. Glutamine significantly increased the urine levels of acetamide, acetate, citrulline, creatinine, and methymalonate, and decreased the urine levels of ethanol and formate (p < 0.05). Moreover, N-carbamylglutamate significantly increased the urine levels of creatinine, ethanol, indoxyl sulfate, lactate, methymalonate, acetoacetate, m-hydroxyphenylacetate, and sarcosine, and decreased the urine levels of acetamide, acetate, citrulline, creatine, glycine, hippurate, homogentisate, N-acetylglutamate, phenylacetyglycine, acetone, and p-hydroxyphenylacetate (p < 0.05). Results suggested that glutamine and N-carbamylglutamate could modify urinary metabolome related to nitrogen metabolism and gut microbiota metabolism. Moreover, N-carbamylglutamate could alter energy and lipid metabolism. These findings indicate that different arginine precursors may lead to differences in the biofluid profile in rats. © 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


Zhou A.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | Wang Z.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | Ai D.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education
Journal of Animal and Plant Sciences | Year: 2010

Antigen protein contained in soybeans are the major cause of allergic reaction in young animals. In this study, glycinin and β-conglycinin were purified material and experimentally tested at concentration of 0.1, 5, and 10 mg/ml for their effects on integrity and immune responses of mouse intestinal epithelial cells. At 5 mg/ml or above, glycinin and β- conglycinin undermined the integrity of intestinal epithelial cells, inhibited epithelial cell proliferation, and significantly increase the levels of LDH and GOT released to the culture medium. The administration of glycinin and β-conglycinin also significantly promoted the secretion of inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, IL-8), a key feature in allergic reactions.


Liu G.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Liu G.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | Fang T.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Fang T.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | And 11 more authors.
RSC Advances | Year: 2014

Many factors can induce oxidative stress in livestock production. Such stress results in damage to cellular antioxidant defense, suboptimal livestock health conditions, and decrease in production efficiency. Spermine supplementation is known to have the potential to mitigate the effects of oxidative stress. However, the systematic changes in metabolic biochemistry associated with oxidative stress and spermine intervention remain largely unknown. This study aims to investigate the effects of oxidative stress and spermine supplementation on the metabolism of weaned rats. Rats received intragastric administration of either 0.4 μmol g-1 body weight of spermine or saline solution for 3 days. The rats in each treatment were then intraperitoneally injected with diquat at 12 mg kg-1 body weight or sterile solution. The 24 h urine and 48 h plasma samples after the last spermine ingestion were analyzed by using nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics. Spermine supplementation and diquat injection can change common systemic metabolic processes, including lipid metabolism, glucose and energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, as well as gut microbiota functions. Moreover, diquat can induce oxidative stress and alter bile acid metabolism. Under oxidative stress, spermine supplementation could partially counteract the metabolite changes induced by oxidative stress, including amino acid metabolism and lipid metabolism. This study demonstrates the importance of spermine supplementation in regulating the metabolism of weaned rats. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014.


Fang T.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Fang T.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | Liu G.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Liu G.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | And 13 more authors.
RSC Advances | Year: 2016

The present work aimed at investigating the effects of spermine supplementation and extended spermine administration on the intestinal morphology, enzyme activity, and serum antioxidant capacity of suckling piglets. Eighty piglets were randomly assigned to two groups, i.e., those with adequate nutrient intake supplemented with spermine (0.4 mmol kg-1 body weight) or those with restricted nutrient intake supplemented with saline. The piglets were fed in pairs for 7 h or 3, 6, or 9 days. The results of analysis are as follows: (1) the villus height, villus width, villus : crypt ratio, and villus surface area in the jejunum of spermine-treated piglets significantly increased by 17.39%, 21.56%, 45.22%, and 45.45%, respectively, compared with those of the control. The specific activities of sucrase, maltase, and diamine oxidase in this organ also significantly increased by 34.55%, 12.77%, and 10.00%, respectively, but lactase activity decreased by 22.56% (spermine group vs. the control group). Extended spermine administration significantly increased jejunal development. (2) Compared with those of the control group, the ileum of the piglets in the spermine group showed significant increases in villus height, villus width, villus : crypt ratio, and villus surface area of 25.64%, 21.61%, 61.05%, and 52.94%, respectively. The specific activities of sucrase, alkaline phosphatase, and diamine oxidase in this organ significantly increased by 24.36%, 5.56%, and 20.23%, respectively, but lactase activity decreased by 39.08%. Extended spermine administration also significantly enhanced ileal development. (3) Compared with the control piglets, spermine promoted increases in catalase (CAT), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), and anti-superoxide anion (ASA) activities and glutathione (GSH) content (by 23.19%, 30.63%, 5.64%, 10.31%, and 33.70%, respectively, P < 0.05), as well as decreases in malondialdehyde (MDA) activity (by 23.01%; P < 0.05) in piglet serum. Extended spermine administration significantly enhanced antioxidant capacity of serum. Collectively, these results suggest that spermine ingestion and extended spermine supplementation can accelerate gut maturation and enhance the antioxidant status of piglets. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2016.


Liu G.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Liu G.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | Yan T.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Yan T.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | And 17 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2013

This study aims to investigate the effect of zearalenone supplementation on rat metabolism. Rats received biweekly intragastric administration of zearalenone mycotoxin (3 mg/kg body weight) for 2 weeks. Urine and plasma samples after zearalenone administration were analyzed by NMR-based metabolomics. Zearalenone exposure significantly elevated the plasma levels of glucose, lactate, N-acetyl glycoprotein, O-acetyl glycoprotein, and propionate but reduced the plasma levels of tyrosine, branched-chain amino acids, and choline metabolites. Zearalenone supplementation decreased the urine levels of butyrate, lactate, and nicotinate. However, it increased the urine levels of allantoin, choline, and N-methylnicotinamide at 0-8 h after the last zearalenone administration and those of 1-methylhistidine, acetoacetate, acetone, and indoxyl sulfate at 8-24 h after the last zearalenone administration. These results suggest that zearalenone exposure can cause oxidative stress and change common systemic metabolic processes, including cell membrane metabolism, protein biosynthesis, glycolysis, and gut microbiota metabolism. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Cao W.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Cao W.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | Liu G.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Liu G.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | And 15 more authors.
RSC Advances | Year: 2015

Spermine is a ubiquitous cellular component that plays vital roles in the maintenance of nucleic acids, regulation of kinase activities, protein synthesis, control of ion channel activities and renewal of the gut epithelium. However, knowledge of the effects of spermine supplementation and its duration extension on intestinal growth and antioxidant capacity is lacking. The present work aims to investigate the effects of spermine administration and its extended supplementation on the morphology, digestive enzyme activities, and antioxidant status of the jejunum in suckling rats. The rats received 0.2 μmol g-1 body weight of either spermine or saline solution via intragastric ingestion for 3 or 7 d, and jejunum samples obtained 24 h after the last spermine supplementation were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the specific activity of maltase and the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) in rat jejunum were significantly increased by 105.5% and 11.1%, respectively; in contrast, lactase activity was significantly decreased by 34.8% (spermine group versus the control group). Time extension of spermine administration (7 d) significantly increased the villus height, villus width, surface area, and crypt depth in rat jejunum by 11.2%, 18.2%, 5.9%, and 50%, respectively, but significantly decreased the specific activities of lactase, maltase, alkaline phosphatase, and malondialdehyde content by 26.8%, 36.4%, 41.3%, and 26.0% (P < 0.05), respectively. Protein content, sucrase, catalase, T-SOD, and anti-superoxide anion activities were also increased by 23.1%, 424.2%, 45.7%, 11.7%, and 26.4% (P < 0.05), respectively, relative to the levels observed during spermine administration for 3 d. Taken together, the results suggest that spermine administration and extension of its supplementation duration can accelerate gut development and enhance antioxidant properties. © 2015 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Liu G.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Liu G.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | Xiao L.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Xiao L.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | And 13 more authors.
Food and Function | Year: 2016

Numerous factors can induce oxidative stress in animal production and lead to growth retardation, disease, and even death. Arginine and N-carbamylglutamate can alleviate the effects of oxidative stress. However, the systematic changes in metabolic biochemistry linked to oxidative stress and arginine and N-carbamylglutamate treatment remain largely unknown. This study aims to examine the effects of arginine and N-carbamylglutamate on rat metabolism under oxidative stress. Thirty rats were randomly divided into three dietary groups (n = 10 each). The rats were fed a basal diet supplemented with 0 (control), 1% arginine, or 0.1% N-carbamylglutamate for 30 days. On day 28, the rats in each treatment were intraperitoneally injected with diquat at 12 mg per kg body weight or sterile solution. Urine and plasma samples were analyzed by metabolomics. Compared with the diquat group, the arginine + diquat group had significantly lower levels of acetamide, alanine, lysine, pyruvate, tyrosine, α-glucose, and β-glucose in plasma; N-carbamylglutamate + diquat had higher levels of 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-methylhistidine, acetone, allantoin, asparagine, citrate, phenylalanine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, and tyrosine, and lower levels of low density lipoprotein, lipid, lysine, threonine, unsaturated lipid, urea, and very low density lipoprotein (P < 0.05) in plasma. Compared with the diquat group, the arginine + diquat group had significantly higher levels of citrate, creatinine, homogentisate, and α-ketoglutarate while lower levels of acetamide, citrulline, ethanol, glycine, isobutyrate, lactate, malonate, methymalonate, N-acetylglutamate, N-methylnicotinamide, propionate, and β-glucose (P < 0.05) in urine. Compared with the diquat group, the N-carbamylglutamate + diquat group had significantly higher levels of allantoin, citrate, homogentisate, phenylacetylglycine, α-ketoglutarate, and β-glucose while lower levels of acetamide, acetate, acetone, benzoate, citrulline, ethanol, hippurate, lactate, N-acetylglutamate, nicotinamide, ornithine, and trigonelline (P < 0.05) in urine. Overall, these results suggest that arginine and N-carbamylglutamate can alter the metabolome associated with energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbiota metabolism under oxidative stress. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.


Liu G.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Liu G.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | Yan T.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Yan T.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | And 11 more authors.
RSC Advances | Year: 2015

This study aimed to investigate the effects of spermine supplementation on the ileum metabolism of suckling rats. Rats were intragastrically administered with 0.2 μmol g-1 body weight of either spermine or saline for 3 or 7 days. The ileum samples taken 24 h after the last spermine ingestion were analyzed by NMR-based metabolomics. The results showed that the villus width, surface area, and crypt depth of the rat ileum were increased by 18.0%, 33.3%, 15.7%, respectively, and the specific activities of sucrase and maltase in the rat ileum were also significantly increased by 789.4%, 44.9%, respectively, but the activity of lactase and alkaline phosphatase were decreased by 49.9%, 35.5%, respectively (spermine group relative to control group) and the villus width, surface area, and crypt depth of the rat ileum were increased by 15.1%, 33.3%, 26.3%, respectively [duration extension of spermine (7 days) relative to 3 days] (P < 0.05). Spermine also increased ileum choline, amino acids, inosine, lactate, myo-inositol, scyllo-inositol, and trimethylamine-N-oxide levels and decreased the level of lysine (P < 0.05). The ileum levels of α-glucose, aspartate, creatine, d-galactose, formate, glutathione, glycerolphosphocholine, lipid, and tyrosine were also significantly affected by spermine supplementation (P < 0.05). Collectively, spermine ingestion induces the morphological and common systemic metabolic modifications characterizing the ileum postnatal maturation suggesting the important role of spermine. The metabolic variations could be attributed to functional variations in lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, gut microbial activity, osmoregulation, and oxidative protection. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.


Kuang S.-Y.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Kuang S.-Y.,Sichuan Academy of Animal Science | Xiao W.-W.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Feng L.,Sichuan Agricultural University | And 13 more authors.
Fish and Shellfish Immunology | Year: 2012

Immune response and antioxidant status of immune organs in juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian) fed graded levels of methionine hydroxy analogue (MHA) (0, 5.1, 7.6, 10.2, 12.7, 15.3 g kg -1 diet) for 60 days were investigated. Results indicated that head kidney index, spleen index, red and white blood cell counts significantly increased with increasing MHA levels up to a point (P < 0.05), whereupon decreased (P < 0.05). Glutathione reductase activity in head kidney and spleen, anti-hydroxy radical and glutathione-S-transferase activities in spleen, catalase activity and GSH content in head kidney significantly increased by MHA supplement, while malondialdehyde content, anti-superoxide anion, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase activities in head kidney and spleen, protein carbonyl content and catalase activity in spleen, anti-hydroxy radical activity in head kidney significantly decreased by MHA supplement. However, protein carbonyl content and glutathione-S-transferase activity in head kidney, GSH content in spleen remained unaffected. After 60-day feeding trial, a challenge study was conducted by injection of Aeromonas hydrophila for 17 days. Results showed that survival rate, leukocytes phagocytic activity, lysozyme activity, acid phosphatase activity, total iron-binding capacity, haemagglutination titre, complement 3, 4 and immunoglobulin M contents significantly increased by optimal dietary MHA supplement (P < 0.05). These data suggested that MHA affected antioxidant status of immune organs and promoted immune response in juvenile Jian carp. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Liu G.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Liu G.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | Wu X.,Sichuan Agricultural University | Wu X.,Key Laboratory for Animal Disease Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education | And 11 more authors.
Molecules | Year: 2016

Arginine regulates growth performance, nutrient metabolism and health effects, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. This study aims to investigate the effect of dietary arginine supplementation on rat growth performance and urinary metabolome through1H-NMR spectroscopy. Twenty rats were randomly assigned to two groups supplemented with 0% or 1.0% L-arginine for 4 weeks. Urine samples were analyzed through NMR-based metabolomics. Arginine supplementation significantly increased the urine levels of 4-aminohippurate, acetate, creatine, creatinine, ethanolamine, formate, hippurate, homogentisate, indoxyl sulfate, and phenylacetyglycine. Conversely, arginine decreased the urine levels of acetamide, β-glucose, cirtulline, ethanol, glycine, isobutyrate, lactate, malonate, methymalonate, N-acetylglutamate, N-methylnicotinamide, and propionate. Results suggested that arginine can alter common systemic metabolic processes, including energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbiota metabolism. Moreover, the results also imply a possible physiological role of the metabolism in mediating the arginine supplementation-supported growth of rats. © 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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