Nairobi, Kenya

The Kenya Medical Research Institute is a medical research centre in East Africa's. It is located in Kenya's capital, Nairobi.Established in 1979, KEMRI has played an important role in the fight against malaria, HIV/AIDS and other diseases in Kenya, and in sub-Saharan Africa as a whole.KEMRI Research: Centre for Biotechnology Research and Development :Mandate is to develop biotechnological innovations such as diagnostic kits, vaccines and associated delivery technologyCentre for Clinical Research Centre for Geographic Medicine Research-Coast Centre for Global Health Research Centre for Infectious and Parasitic Diseases Control Research Centre for Microbiology Research Centre for Public Health Research Centre for Respiratory Diseases Research Centre for Traditional Medicine and Drug Research Centre for Virus Research The Eastern and Southern Africa Centre of International Parasite Control KEMRI Graduate School of Health scienceHealth Safety and EnvironmentProduction Centre. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2012-1.1.5. | Award Amount: 10.96M | Year: 2013

HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis (TB) and Malaria alone account for more than six million deaths worldwide every year. Despite substantial efforts made in recent years, Poverty Related Diseases are still spreading. New therapeutic interventions are therefore urgently required to combat Poverty Related Diseases. The existence of a well-developed HIV/TB/Malaria infrastructure presents a prime opportunity to address other sexually transmitted diseases such as viral hepatitis efficiently and effectively. The overall goal of the EURIPRED is to coordinate and integrate international resources into a single specialised infrastructure to support European HIV, TB, Malaria and Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus studies from early drug, vaccine and microbicide discovery to clinical trials. This will be achieved by creating partnerships between European scientists and international research teams from disease endemic countries and strong collaborations between industry and public sector research. Although vaccines, drugs and microbicide research is being conducted in the European Union (EU) there is no single European infrastructure that brings international resources and facilities together to develop cost-effective products for the European market. To underpin this need, EURIPRED will integrate worldwide resources to allow European access to shared reagents. This integrated approach will strengthen international cooperation, increase research capacity in EU and developing countries and significantly contribute to the European Research Area (ERA). By minimising fragmentation and duplication of research efforts and pooling fragmented resources EURIPRED can improve European research efficiency and effectiveness. EURIPRED will be built upon the highly successful model of the Centre for AIDS Reagents (CFAR), a twenty-three year old reagent initiative based at the National Institute of Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC), a centre of the Medical Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority Agency (MHRA) and will comprise of a world-class team of experts and repositories with expertise in vaccine, microbicide and drug development for a range of infectious diseases. By engaging international scientific communities, EURIPRED can play a leading role in driving research forward in Europe and beyond.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH-2009-4.3.1-3 | Award Amount: 13.73M | Year: 2010

Worm infections are receiving increased attention due to: the wide geographic overlap in occurrence between worms and HIV, TB and malaria; the large proportion of individuals (minimal estimates around 25%) co-infected with worms and HIV/TB/ malaria; the potential risk of increasing disease burden; the very limited understanding of the impact by worm infections on HIV-, TB- and malaria-specific immune responses and on their clinical outcome; the lack of established intervention guidelines for treatment of worm infections; and the scarce information on the impact by worm infections on vaccination and vaccine-induced immune responses. In order to address these complex and challenging scientific issues, IDEA project will focus its efforts on four primary objectives: a) the worm-induced modulation of the functional and molecular profile of HIV-, TB- and malaria-specific immune responses, b) the impact by worm co-infections on measures of disease activity of PRDs, c) the immunologic markers of worm-, HIV-, TB- and malaria-specific immune responses associated with better control of pathogen replication and disease, and d) the modulation by worm co-infections of vaccine-induced immune responses. To achieve these objectives, IDEA project has developed a global and innovative strategy which includes: a) the alliance between African and European leading scientists in the field of worms, HIV, TB and malaria, b) the multidisciplinary expertise involving immunologists, parasitologists, epidemiologists, clinicians, and experts in vaccines, c) cutting edge immunology and the most innovative technologies to profile immune response, d) the access to large cohort studies bringing a number of centres working on worms and PRDs in Africa together, and e) the access to experimental HIV, TB and malaria vaccine candidates under clinical development in Africa.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH-2009-4.3.1-1 | Award Amount: 5.16M | Year: 2010

The aim of this project is to develop a new generation vaccine for schistosomiasis. The vaccine will be based on exposed proteins and/or glycans of the vulnerable skin stage schistosomula, making it safe and effective. The life stage-specific vaccine target selection strategy is based on state-of-the-art schistosomal transcriptomics and glycomics technologies and data, and unique serum and sample libraries from endemic areas will be the key to identifying protective immune responses and effective targets. Preclinical in vitro (cellular and whole parasite) and in vivo (rat model) testing of protective antigens with respect to cellular responses and effective parasite killing are part of the development pipeline. Analysis of human T- and B-cell responsiveness is an integral part of the approach. A unique SME-led approach to potentiate the effect of immunisation by use of engineering engineered antibodies will also be part of the project. The project involves strong participation of researchers from four schistosomiasis-endemic countries, and several European groups all with a long history of successful collaboration.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2010.1.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 4.16M | Year: 2011

The HEALTHY FUTURES project is motivated by concern for the health impacts of environmental changes. HEATHLY FUTURES aims to respond to this concern through construction of a disease risk mapping system for three water-related high-impact VBDs (malaria, Rift valley fever and schistosomiasis) in Africa, accounting for environmental/climatic trends and changes in socio-economic conditions to predict future risk. Concentrating on eastern Africa as a study area, HEALTHY FUTURES comprises a comprehensive, inter-disciplinary consortium of health, environment, socio-economic, disease modelling and climate experts in addition to governmental health departments. To achieve its aims, HEALTHY FUTURES will deploy a bottom-up, end-user/stakeholder-focused approach combining field-, laboratory- and library-based research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2009-IAPP | Award Amount: 1.64M | Year: 2011

The aim of the GENDRIVAX (GENome-DRIVen Vaccine) scientific programme is to develop novel prophylactic vaccines against invasive bacterial diseases caused by Salmonella and Neisseria. GENDRIVAX intends to combine the results of recent industrial research (novel platform technologies for producing highly affordable outer membrane antigen based vaccines for Gram-negative bacteria) with the detailed knowledge of the biology of Salmonella and Neisseria infections in Africa supplied by the academic partners. The aim is to make and test the revolutionary concept of vaccines that will be pan-specific. This project is based on collaboration between four institutes: 1. Novartis Vaccines Institute for Global Health S.r.l. (NVGH), the industrial partner with a specific mission to develop vaccines for neglected diseases of developing countries. 2. Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI), academic institution working in the research areas of genetics. 3. Swiss Tropical Institute (STI), a public non-commercial organisation with the mission of contributing to health development. 4. Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), the national body responsible for carrying out health science research in Kenya. The four partners have existing links that form the basis for developing an effective working relationship. However, the academic partners and the industrial partner collaborations are at an early stage (NVGH had its inauguration in February 2008). GENDRIVAX comes at an ideal time as it provides a perfect opportunity to bring together academic innovation with industrial expertise through joint training and exchange initiatives. This activity of Industry-Academia cooperation aims at fulfilling the following goals: 1) to harmonise European research programmes, in order to achieve a critical mass on relevant topics; 2) to foster exchange of scientists; 3) to further improve the quality of European vaccine research of relevance for the developing countries.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.3.2-4 | Award Amount: 15.40M | Year: 2011

The AvecNet consortium will develop practical solutions to the current limitations of vector control strategies in Africa using a combination of translationally-aware, state of the art science and end user analysis to ensure successful development and uptake of the new and improved approaches to malaria control and elimination. Our carefully balanced, multidisciplinary team of European and African experts includes vector biologists, engineers, epidemiologists, social scientists and leaders of large supranational consortia. These partners are all prominent members of global vector control research programs having unique specialization in Africa-centric projects. Together we have developed a proposal focused specifically to address the three major research challenges that confront efforts to interrupt mosquito-mediated transmission of malaria in Africa: 1. The need for practical strategies to prolong the efficacy of existing insecticide-based vector control methods, 2.The need to develop new interventions that target all major malaria vectors, that are simultaneously effective, socially acceptable and sustainable, 3. The impact of the major demographic and environmental changes occurring in Africa on malaria epidemiology and control. These research activities are cross-linked by specific tasks to reinforce our commitment to ensure sustainability, engage all stakeholders and strengthen research capacity in Africa. Overall, the project will add significant value to the international research effort in vector control by taking forward the state of the art and translating this into new or improved control tools that will be trialled within the time frame of this project. The studies planned in this collaborative project will provide scalable solutions, giving the solid platform upon which ongoing and future vector control programmes can be built.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: ERC-SG | Phase: ERC-SG-SH3 | Award Amount: 1.21M | Year: 2012

Population structure and change and social contact patterns are major determinants of the observed epidemiology of infectious diseases, including the consequences on health. Demographic structure and the components of demographic dynamics are changing over time and substantially differ within countries and most critically between countries. However, some of the overall consequences of demographic changes remain unclear, though urbanisation and fertility decline will certainly have a profound impact on social structures, family composition and, as a consequence, on disease spread and on the identification of effective public health measures. DECIDE will explore the following questions: 1. What are the major short- and medium-term impacts of demographic changes on the patterns of infectious disease (morbidity and mortality)? 2. How are these demographic changes affecting contact patterns that are of fundamental importance to the spread of infectious diseases? Are there new and different modes of transmission within and between populations? 3. What are the implications of demographic changes for infection control strategies? What is the interplay between demographic changes and public health policies in shaping future trajectories of infectious diseases? In order to answer these questions, DECIDE will use the following strategy: analyse harmonised demographic and health survey data (DHS), and health and demographic surveillance system data (HDSS); develop new estimates of social contact patterns and other socio-demographic variables collecting data from representative samples of both urban and rural settings in selected countries; develop a theoretical framework to predict the likely chains through which demographic change influences the burden of infectious diseases; develop and parameterise mathematical population models for the transmission of infectious diseases to evaluate the impact of public health measures under changing demographic conditions.

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