Nairobi, Kenya

The Kenya Medical Research Institute is a medical research centre in East Africa's. It is located in Kenya's capital, Nairobi.Established in 1979, KEMRI has played an important role in the fight against malaria, HIV/AIDS and other diseases in Kenya, and in sub-Saharan Africa as a whole.KEMRI Research: Centre for Biotechnology Research and Development :Mandate is to develop biotechnological innovations such as diagnostic kits, vaccines and associated delivery technologyCentre for Clinical Research Centre for Geographic Medicine Research-Coast Centre for Global Health Research Centre for Infectious and Parasitic Diseases Control Research Centre for Microbiology Research Centre for Public Health Research Centre for Respiratory Diseases Research Centre for Traditional Medicine and Drug Research Centre for Virus Research The Eastern and Southern Africa Centre of International Parasite Control KEMRI Graduate School of Health scienceHealth Safety and EnvironmentProduction Centre. Wikipedia.


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GENEVA--(BUSINESS WIRE)--At this year’s World Health Assembly, GE Healthcare and Women in Global Health, a movement that strives for greater gender equality in global health leadership, are joining forces to honor and celebrate women in global health. Today, women make up 75 percent of the global healthcare workforce in many regions1 and contribute nearly $3 trillion to the industry. But too often their contributions go unpaid and unrecognized – and stories of their impact go untold. As we seek to increase the numbers of women in leadership in the field of global health, we are highlighting the valuable work and achievements of these women. Research has shown that women and girls are disproportionately affected by disease2, and that when women are in leadership roles, they will make decisions that are more supportive of women and children and lead to improved women’s health outcomes.3 Improving women’s health is a central focus of the global health community4 and advancing gender equality is therefore seen by many as a means of benefitting communities and public health. “These women are working tirelessly to improve global health with dedication and passion to champion better healthcare for all. To change the face of global health for the future, we are committed to help recognize, develop and grow women’s leadership – and to start by sharing the stories of women leading the charge,” said Terri Bresenham, President and CEO of Sustainable Healthcare Solutions, GE Healthcare. “At GE Healthcare, we place tremendous value on training and education of healthcare professionals across emerging markets and we are starting from the frontlines by ensuring that 50 percent of our training places are available for women.” "Investing in girls and women results in greater societal return. It is acknowledged that women are underpaid and under-recognized in many workforces. In the global health field, it becomes more pervasive as women are at the front lines, taking on the toughest health challenges to ensure there are healthier communities, yet they are not represented in decision-making positions. As we celebrate women in global health, we are taking a moment to recognize women's contributions to health and highlight their achievements. Through shining a light on the great leaders we have in the field, we aim to inspire everyone to do more to advance gender equality for the benefit of communities and public health all over the world,” said Roopa Dhatt, Director and Co-founder of Women in Global Health. The nominees have been selected across a number of focus areas and countries: Dr. Sharmila Anand (India) – Dr. Anand leads Santosh Educational & Health Care Pvt Ltd. (SEHPL), a social enterprise which focuses on developing the next generation of healthcare professionals and leaders who can transform the way healthcare is delivered in India. She works on various initiatives that focus on enhancing the skills of people in healthcare at various levels. Sreytouch Vong (Cambodia) – Vong is a research fellow, affiliated with ReBUILD and RinGs consortium which deals with gender analysis. She has engaged in extensive health system research and public health research, that focuses on improving health financing, gender and human resources, and nutrition within healthcare systems. Vong is also working to form a group of health researchers to bridge gaps between users of evidence and the research community in Cambodia. Elvira Dayrit (Philippines) – Dayrit has worked in the Philippine Department of Health for 27 years. She is dedicated to making government health programs work effectively, efficiently, and in a wide enough scale to create health impact. She is currently the Bureau Director for Health Human Resources where she works to streamline the Bureau. Dr. Semakaleng Phafol (Lesotho) – Dr. Phafol is a Lesotho Professional Nurse and Education Specialist with more than 25 years of experience in nursing practice, nursing education, community/public health and management of clinical services. She has helped to establish and strengthen clinical placements for over 1000 nursing midwifery students at over 60 health centres. Mwanamvua Boga (Kenya) – Boga is a nurse manager working with the Kenya Medical Research Institute – Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Kilifi on the Kenyan coast. She works in a high dependency pediatric unit at the Kilifi County Hospital that provides clinical care in parallel to conducting medical research in tropical diseases. The unit admits children with a range of conditions including extremely premature babies, children with meningitis, severe malaria, sepsis, cancers and more. Mercy Owuor (Kenya) - Owuor is a Community Programs Director at Lwala Community Alliance where she provides leadership for community programs including efforts to improve maternal and child health, adolescent sexual and reproductive health and HIV care, treatment and stigma reduction. She also works to build the independence of young adolescent girls through mentorship and economic empowerment. Rohani Dg Te’ne (Indonesia) – Te’ne has worked in health for more than 20 years and is now a volunteer community health motivator for Tamaona community health centre. The rural area where Te’ne lives is not accessible by vehicle so she escorts local villagers needing healthcare and especially pregnant women, to the community health centre through difficult terrain which can take over an hour by foot. Margaret Gyapong (Ghana) – Gyapong is currently a Medical Anthropologist at the University of Health and Allied Science in Ghana. Until March 2017, she was the Deputy Director for Research and Development in the Ghana Health Service. Gyapong has also helped turn the Dodowa Health Research Centre into an institution of international repute. Emmah Kariuki (Kenya) – As a Service Delivery Officer with Jhpiego in Kenya, Kariuki works to bring low cost health innovations to disadvantaged communities. This entails providing technical support for service delivery in family planning reproductive health. Kariuki also provides training to healthcare providers, develops training materials, coordinates research activities and supports the Ministry of Health in the implementation of family planning and reproductive activities. Kwanele Asante (South Africa) – Patient activist, lawyer and bioethicist, Asante serves as Chair of the Ministerial Advisory Committee on Cancer and has founded and led an effort to end disparities in global cancer. Asante works to ensure that the voice of patients facing barriers to care is elevated to give them a greater chance at prolonging their life. Dr. Aula Abbara (Greece) – Dr. Abbara is the project lead in Greece for the Syrian American Medical Society Global Response, which provides primary healthcare to refugees together with the Greek authorities and International Non-Governmental Organisations. The range of services provided includes: pediatric and maternal health and delivering a Teaching Recovery Techniques program with the Children and War Foundation. Dr. Abbara also teaches healthcare workers in Turkey on topics related to infectious disease. Samalie Kitooleko (Uganda) – Kitooleko is a nurse in charge of the Uganda Rheumatic Heart Disease Registry. She takes care of patients with chronic cardiovascular illnesses such as congenital heart disease, myocardial infarction and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). She realized an increasing number of RHD patients, especially young women, lacked knowledge about their illness and were dying due to preventable complications which inspired her to champion for patient education. Louise Nilunger Mannheimer (Sweden) – Mannheimer is Head of Unit at the Health and Sexuality Unit at the Public Health Agency of Sweden where she is currently leading a team responsible for the national coordination of sexual and reproductive health and rights. Her work also includes HIV prevention of young adults, LGBT rights and tackling male violence against women. With these awards, Women in Global Health, GE Healthcare and our partners aim to celebrate the contributions of women leaders in global health, whose work is championing better health in their communities. We worked closely with our partner organisations to identify women who have made an impact in categories listed above. This list is by no means comprehensive and we are aware that there are many more women out there making great achievements and advances to improve global healthcare at all ends of the spectrum. The focus of this honor is telling the stories of those women who are making an impact at the local, grassroots level and in traditionally under-represented communities. Recognizing the need for these untold stories to reach beyond Geneva, GE Healthcare will be previewing a new documentary that follows three of these women from sunrise to sunset to answer one question: how have these individuals made an impact on the disparity that exists in global health in a way much of the world is still striving to do? Premiering in June, Heroines of Health takes us from South Sulawesi, Indonesia, where Mrs. Rohani wakes up at 4 a.m. for her morning prayer so she can walk pregnant mothers to the nearest health center; to Lwala, Kenya, where Mercy Owuor educates her community about health issues; to Chennai, India, where Dr.. Sharmila Anand is enabling young women to gain employment through a radiology training program. Three women. Three countries. Three stories untold. Until now. Watch the trailer at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iy6YJHcPr8I. GE Healthcare provides transformational medical technologies and services to meet the demand for increased access, enhanced quality and more affordable healthcare around the world. GE (NYSE: GE) works on things that matter - great people and technologies taking on tough challenges. From medical imaging, software & IT, patient monitoring and diagnostics to drug discovery, biopharmaceutical manufacturing technologies and performance improvement solutions, GE Healthcare helps medical professionals deliver great healthcare to their patients. For more information about GE Healthcare, visit our website at www.gehealthcare.com. Women in Global Health (WGH) is a global movement that brings together all genders and backgrounds to achieve gender equality in global health leadership. We believe that everyone has the right to attain equal levels of participation in leadership and decision-making regardless of gender. WGH creates a platform for discussions and collaborative space for leadership, facilitates specific education and training, garners support and commitment from the global community, and demands change for Gender Transformative Leadership. WGH is a virtually based network, registered in California, USA. 1 WHO, Spotlight on statistics: A fact file on health workforce statistics. Gender and health workforce statistics, Issue 2, February 2008. Available online at: http://www.who.int/hrh/statistics/spotlight_2.pdf 4 United Nations: We can end poverty: Millenium development goals and beyond 2015. http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/bkgd.shtml.


bioLytical Laboratories, un líder mundial en los test rápidos de enfermedades infecciosas, se complace al anunciar que el INSTI HIV Self Test ha recibido un certificado de validación del Kenya Ministry of Health, Kenya Medical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians Board (KMLTTB), tras el éxito del estudio de campo llevado a cabo en Kenia Occidental por medio de los investigadores del Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), de Nairobi. Este ensayo prospectivo de los auto-probadores fue el primero de su clase en demostrar un elevado nivel de rendimiento y utilización de un auto-test basado en sangre con tirilla de prueba como INSTI. INSTI es el primer auto-test de VIH de cualquier clase en recibir la aprobación oficial en Kenia.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2012-1.1.5. | Award Amount: 10.96M | Year: 2013

HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis (TB) and Malaria alone account for more than six million deaths worldwide every year. Despite substantial efforts made in recent years, Poverty Related Diseases are still spreading. New therapeutic interventions are therefore urgently required to combat Poverty Related Diseases. The existence of a well-developed HIV/TB/Malaria infrastructure presents a prime opportunity to address other sexually transmitted diseases such as viral hepatitis efficiently and effectively. The overall goal of the EURIPRED is to coordinate and integrate international resources into a single specialised infrastructure to support European HIV, TB, Malaria and Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus studies from early drug, vaccine and microbicide discovery to clinical trials. This will be achieved by creating partnerships between European scientists and international research teams from disease endemic countries and strong collaborations between industry and public sector research. Although vaccines, drugs and microbicide research is being conducted in the European Union (EU) there is no single European infrastructure that brings international resources and facilities together to develop cost-effective products for the European market. To underpin this need, EURIPRED will integrate worldwide resources to allow European access to shared reagents. This integrated approach will strengthen international cooperation, increase research capacity in EU and developing countries and significantly contribute to the European Research Area (ERA). By minimising fragmentation and duplication of research efforts and pooling fragmented resources EURIPRED can improve European research efficiency and effectiveness. EURIPRED will be built upon the highly successful model of the Centre for AIDS Reagents (CFAR), a twenty-three year old reagent initiative based at the National Institute of Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC), a centre of the Medical Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority Agency (MHRA) and will comprise of a world-class team of experts and repositories with expertise in vaccine, microbicide and drug development for a range of infectious diseases. By engaging international scientific communities, EURIPRED can play a leading role in driving research forward in Europe and beyond.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2010.1.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 4.16M | Year: 2011

The HEALTHY FUTURES project is motivated by concern for the health impacts of environmental changes. HEATHLY FUTURES aims to respond to this concern through construction of a disease risk mapping system for three water-related high-impact VBDs (malaria, Rift valley fever and schistosomiasis) in Africa, accounting for environmental/climatic trends and changes in socio-economic conditions to predict future risk. Concentrating on eastern Africa as a study area, HEALTHY FUTURES comprises a comprehensive, inter-disciplinary consortium of health, environment, socio-economic, disease modelling and climate experts in addition to governmental health departments. To achieve its aims, HEALTHY FUTURES will deploy a bottom-up, end-user/stakeholder-focused approach combining field-, laboratory- and library-based research.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2009-IAPP | Award Amount: 1.64M | Year: 2011

The aim of the GENDRIVAX (GENome-DRIVen Vaccine) scientific programme is to develop novel prophylactic vaccines against invasive bacterial diseases caused by Salmonella and Neisseria. GENDRIVAX intends to combine the results of recent industrial research (novel platform technologies for producing highly affordable outer membrane antigen based vaccines for Gram-negative bacteria) with the detailed knowledge of the biology of Salmonella and Neisseria infections in Africa supplied by the academic partners. The aim is to make and test the revolutionary concept of vaccines that will be pan-specific. This project is based on collaboration between four institutes: 1. Novartis Vaccines Institute for Global Health S.r.l. (NVGH), the industrial partner with a specific mission to develop vaccines for neglected diseases of developing countries. 2. Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI), academic institution working in the research areas of genetics. 3. Swiss Tropical Institute (STI), a public non-commercial organisation with the mission of contributing to health development. 4. Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), the national body responsible for carrying out health science research in Kenya. The four partners have existing links that form the basis for developing an effective working relationship. However, the academic partners and the industrial partner collaborations are at an early stage (NVGH had its inauguration in February 2008). GENDRIVAX comes at an ideal time as it provides a perfect opportunity to bring together academic innovation with industrial expertise through joint training and exchange initiatives. This activity of Industry-Academia cooperation aims at fulfilling the following goals: 1) to harmonise European research programmes, in order to achieve a critical mass on relevant topics; 2) to foster exchange of scientists; 3) to further improve the quality of European vaccine research of relevance for the developing countries.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.3.2-4 | Award Amount: 15.40M | Year: 2011

The AvecNet consortium will develop practical solutions to the current limitations of vector control strategies in Africa using a combination of translationally-aware, state of the art science and end user analysis to ensure successful development and uptake of the new and improved approaches to malaria control and elimination. Our carefully balanced, multidisciplinary team of European and African experts includes vector biologists, engineers, epidemiologists, social scientists and leaders of large supranational consortia. These partners are all prominent members of global vector control research programs having unique specialization in Africa-centric projects. Together we have developed a proposal focused specifically to address the three major research challenges that confront efforts to interrupt mosquito-mediated transmission of malaria in Africa: 1. The need for practical strategies to prolong the efficacy of existing insecticide-based vector control methods, 2.The need to develop new interventions that target all major malaria vectors, that are simultaneously effective, socially acceptable and sustainable, 3. The impact of the major demographic and environmental changes occurring in Africa on malaria epidemiology and control. These research activities are cross-linked by specific tasks to reinforce our commitment to ensure sustainability, engage all stakeholders and strengthen research capacity in Africa. Overall, the project will add significant value to the international research effort in vector control by taking forward the state of the art and translating this into new or improved control tools that will be trialled within the time frame of this project. The studies planned in this collaborative project will provide scalable solutions, giving the solid platform upon which ongoing and future vector control programmes can be built.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: ERC-SG | Phase: ERC-SG-SH3 | Award Amount: 1.21M | Year: 2012

Population structure and change and social contact patterns are major determinants of the observed epidemiology of infectious diseases, including the consequences on health. Demographic structure and the components of demographic dynamics are changing over time and substantially differ within countries and most critically between countries. However, some of the overall consequences of demographic changes remain unclear, though urbanisation and fertility decline will certainly have a profound impact on social structures, family composition and, as a consequence, on disease spread and on the identification of effective public health measures. DECIDE will explore the following questions: 1. What are the major short- and medium-term impacts of demographic changes on the patterns of infectious disease (morbidity and mortality)? 2. How are these demographic changes affecting contact patterns that are of fundamental importance to the spread of infectious diseases? Are there new and different modes of transmission within and between populations? 3. What are the implications of demographic changes for infection control strategies? What is the interplay between demographic changes and public health policies in shaping future trajectories of infectious diseases? In order to answer these questions, DECIDE will use the following strategy: analyse harmonised demographic and health survey data (DHS), and health and demographic surveillance system data (HDSS); develop new estimates of social contact patterns and other socio-demographic variables collecting data from representative samples of both urban and rural settings in selected countries; develop a theoretical framework to predict the likely chains through which demographic change influences the burden of infectious diseases; develop and parameterise mathematical population models for the transmission of infectious diseases to evaluate the impact of public health measures under changing demographic conditions.

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