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Block S.L.,Kentucky Pediatric and Adult Research | Falloon J.,Med Immune Ltd. | Hirschfield J.A.,Score Physician Alliance | Krilov L.R.,Winthrop University | And 3 more authors.
Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal | Year: 2012

Background: Influenza B viruses from 2 lineages cocirculate annually. Because the single B strain contained in trivalent vaccines may not match the major circulating strain, adding a second B virus could enhance protection. This study compared the safety and immunogenicity of an investigational quadrivalent Ann Arbor strain live attenuated influenza vaccine (Q/LAIV) with that of 2 trivalent vaccines (T/LAIV), each containing a B strain from a different lineage. Methods: This randomized, double-blind study was designed to demonstrate the immunologic noninferiority of Q/LAIV compared with T/LAIV in children 2-17 years of age by comparing postdose geometric mean titers of hemagglutination inhibition antibodies. Children were randomized 3:1:1 to receive Q/LAIV or 1 of 2 T/LAIV vaccines. Those subjects who were 9-17 years of age received 1 dose, and those 2-8 years of age received 2 doses 1 month apart. Serum immune responses were evaluated 1 month after dose 1 (dose 2 for influenza vaccine-naive subjects aged 2-8 years). Results: Q/LAIV was noninferior to T/LAIV: upper bounds for all four 95% confidence intervals for the postdose geometric mean titer ratios (T/LAIV divided by Q/LAIV) were ≤1.5, the predefined noninferiority margin. The overall seroresponse rates (4-fold rise) were comparable between treatment groups. Safety events were comparable, except that fever was more common after dose 1 in Q/LAIV subjects (5.1%) than in T/LAIV subjects (3.1%) 2-8 years of age. Conclusions: The immunogenicity of Q/LAIV was noninferior to that of T/LAIV in children aged 2-17 years; safety was also comparable. Q/LAIV may broaden the protection against influenza B strains provided by current trivalent influenza vaccines. © 2012 by Lippincott Williams ∧ Wilkins. Source


Block S.L.,Kentucky Pediatric and Adult Research | Yi T.,Med Immune Ltd. | Sheldon E.,Miami Research Associates | Dubovsky F.,Med Immune Ltd. | Falloon J.,Med Immune Ltd.
Vaccine | Year: 2011

Background: Trivalent seasonal influenza vaccines contain 2 A strains and 1 B strain. B strains of 2 antigenically distinct lineages, Yamagata and Victoria, have been co-circulating annually, and the B strain included in vaccines often has not been a lineage match to the major circulating strain. Thus, a vaccine containing B strains from both lineages could broaden protection against influenza. Quadrivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (Q/LAIV) is an investigational 4-strain formulation of LAIV that contains 2 A strains, A/H1N1 and A/H3N2, and 2 B strains, 1 from each lineage. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, active-controlled study of Q/LAIV was conducted in 1800 adults aged 18-49 years to compare the immunogenicity and safety of Q/LAIV to trivalent LAIV (T/LAIV). Subjects were randomized 4:1:1 to receive an intranasal dose of Q/LAIV (. n=. 1200) or 1 of 2 matching T/LAIV vaccines, each containing 1 of the B strains included in Q/LAIV (. n=. 600 total). The primary endpoint was the comparison of the post-vaccination strain-specific geometric mean titers (GMT) of hemagglutination inhibition antibody in Q/LAIV recipients to those in T/LAIV recipients, with immunologic noninferiority of Q/LAIV to be demonstrated if the upper bound of the 2-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) for the ratio of the GMTs [T/LAIV divided by Q/LAIV] was ≤1.5 for all strains. Results and Conclusion: Q/LAIV met the criteria for noninferiority: the ratios of the GMTs for the A/H1N1, A/H3N2, B/Yamagata, and B/Victoria strains were 1.09 (95% CI, 1.01-1.18), 1.05 (95% CI, 0.96-1.14), 1.10 (95% CI, 0.97-1.25), and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.82-1.03), respectively. Solicited symptoms and adverse events were similar in the Q/LAIV and T/LAIV arms. Q/LAIV may confer increased protection against influenza by targeting B strains from both lineages. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Toback S.L.,Med Immune Ltd. | Levin M.J.,University of Colorado at Denver | Block S.L.,Kentucky Pediatric and Adult Research | Belshe R.B.,Saint Louis University | And 2 more authors.
Expert Review of Vaccines | Year: 2012

Influenza B is responsible for significant morbidity in children and adults worldwide. For more than 25 years, two antigenically distinct lineages of influenza B viruses, B/Yamagata and B/Victoria, have cocirculated globally. Current influenza vaccine formulations are trivalent and contain two influenza subtype A strains (A/H1N1 and A/H3N2) but only one B strain. In a half of recent influenza seasons, the predominant circulating influenza B lineage was different from that contained in trivalent influenza vaccines. A quadrivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (Q/LAIV) that contains two B strains, one from each lineage, has been developed to help provide broad protection against influenza B. Q/LAIV was recently approved for use in the USA in eligible individuals 2-49 years of age. This review summarizes clinical trial data in support of Q/LAIV. © 2012 2012 Expert Reviews Ltd. Source


Lehtinen M.,University of Tampere | Paavonen J.,University of Helsinki | Wheeler C.M.,University of New Mexico | Jaisamrarn U.,Chulalongkorn University | And 27 more authors.
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2012

Background: Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater (CIN2+) is the surrogate endpoint used in licensure trials of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. Vaccine efficacy against CIN3+, the immediate precursor to invasive cervical cancer, is more difficult to measure because of its lower incidence, but provides the most stringent evidence of potential cancer prevention. We report vaccine efficacy against CIN3+ and adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) in the end-of-study analysis of PATRICIA (PApilloma TRIal against Cancer In young Adults). Methods: Healthy women aged 15-25 years with no more than six lifetime sexual partners were included in PATRICIA, irrespective of their baseline HPV DNA status, HPV-16 or HPV-18 serostatus, or cytology. Women were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive an HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine or a control hepatitis A vaccine via an internet-based central randomisation system using a minimisation algorithm to account for age ranges and study sites. The patients and study investigators were masked to allocated vaccine. The primary endpoint of PATRICIA has been reported previously. In the present end-of-study analysis, we focus on CIN3+ and AIS in the populations of most clinical interest, the total vaccinated cohort (TVC) and the TVC-naive. The TVC comprised all women who received at least one vaccine dose, approximating catch-up populations and including sexually active women (vaccine n=9319; control=9325). The TVC-naive comprised women with no evidence of oncogenic HPV infection at baseline, approximating early adolescent HPV exposure (vaccine n=5824; control=5820). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00122681. Findings: Vaccine efficacy against CIN3+ associated with HPV-16/18 was 100% (95% CI 85·5-100) in the TVC-naive and 45·7% (22·9-62·2) in the TVC. Vaccine efficacy against all CIN3+ (irrespective of HPV type in the lesion and including lesions with no HPV DNA detected) was 93·2% (78·9-98·7) in the TVC-naive and 45·6% (28·8-58·7) in the TVC. In the TVC-naive, vaccine efficacy against all CIN3+ was higher than 90% in all age groups. In the TVC, vaccine efficacy against all CIN3+ and CIN3+ associated with HPV-16/18 was highest in the 15-17 year age group and progressively decreased in the 18-20 year and 21-25 year age groups. Vaccine efficacy against all AIS was 100% (31·0-100) and 76·9% (16·0-95·8) in the TVC-naive and TVC, respectively. Serious adverse events occurred in 835 (9·0%) and 829 (8·9%) women in the vaccine and control groups, respectively; only ten events (0·1%) and five events (0·1%), respectively, were considered to be related to vaccination. Interpretation: PATRICIA end-of-study results show excellent vaccine efficacy against CIN3+ and AIS irrespective of HPV DNA in the lesion. Population-based vaccination that incorporates the HPV-16/18 vaccine and high coverage of early adolescents might have the potential to substantially reduce the incidence of cervical cancer. Funding: GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Hedrick J.A.,Kentucky Pediatric and Adult Research
Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy | Year: 2010

Common community-acquired infections include those of the upper respiratory tract. In the 1990s, the antimicrobial treatment of upper respiratory tract infections focused on penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, following the introduction of a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, a decrease in invasive pneumococcal disease occurred, and in the case of otitis media a shift towards Haemophilus influenzae as the predominant causative pathogen was observed. Future antimicrobial therapy for outpatient upper respiratory tract infections may need to focus on pathogens such as penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae,-lactamase-producing H. influenzae,-lactamase-negative amoxicillin-resistant H. influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. In these circumstances, third-generation oral cephalosporins, such as cefixime and cefdinir, could be increasingly used as an optional first-line therapy in community practice for upper respiratory tract infections suspected to be caused by these key pathogens, as an alternative to amoxicillin-clavulanate. © 2010 Expert Reviews Ltd. Source

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