Kentucky Equine Research

Kentucky, Kentucky, United States

Kentucky Equine Research

Kentucky, Kentucky, United States

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Finno C.J.,University of Minnesota | Finno C.J.,University of California at Davis | McKenzie E.,University of Minnesota | McKenzie E.,Oregon State University | And 2 more authors.
Equine Veterinary Journal | Year: 2010

Reasons for performing study: Recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis (RER) occurs in fit, nervous Thoroughbreds fed high nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) diets. Clinical signs are diminished by feeding low NSC, high fat diets; however, the mechanism is unclear.Objective: To determine if the glucose, insulin and cortisol response to isocaloric diets varying in fat and NSC availability differ in fit vs. unfit Thoroughbreds with RER.Materials and methods: Four fit (10 weeks treadmill training) RER Thoroughbred mares were exercised and fed 3 isocaloric (121 MJ/day) diets in a 5 day/diet block design. Two high NSC concentrates, sweet feed (SF) and a processed pelleted feed (PL) and a low starch high fat feed (FAT) were used. After 24 h of rest and a 12 h fast, horses ate half their daily concentrate. Blood sampled for [glucose], [insulin] and [cortisol] was obtained before, immediately after and at 30-60 min intervals for 420 min. After 3-6 months detraining period, the block design was repeated. Results: Results for SF and PL were similar. Regardless of diet, cortisol was higher in fit vs. unfit horses. Fit horses on SF/PL had higher post prandial [insulin] and insulin:glucose ratio than unfit horses. FAT resulted in lower post prandial [glucose] and [insulin] vs. SF/PL. Higher [insulin] in fit vs. unfit horses was not seen on the FAT diet.Conclusions: Increased post prandial [glucose], [insulin] and [cortisol] induced by high NSC, but not high fat, feeds are enhanced by fitness in RER horses. This combination may trigger rhabdomyolysis through increased excitability in RER Thoroughbreds. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.


Pagan J.D.,Kentucky Equine Research | Lawrence T.J.,Kentucky Equine Research | Lawrence L.A.,Kentucky Equine Research | Brown-Douglas C.,Kentucky Equine Research
EAAP Scientific Series | Year: 2010

Hindgut acidosis (HGA) is a potential problem in horses consuming large quantities of grain or fructan rich forages. Horses suffering from HGA may develop anorexia, colic, laminitis or display stereotypical behaviors such as wood chewing and stall weaving. Six exercised Thoroughbreds were used in a two period switch back design study to evaluate the effect of protected sodium bicarbonate (PSB) supplementation on hindgut acidosis in horses fed a high grain ration. Horses were fed a basal ration of unfortified sweet feed (9.32±0.76 g DMI/kg BW/day), timothy grass hay (9.11±0.26 g DMI/kg BW/day) and 50 g of loose salt per day. The treatments were 168 g/day (0.33±0.01 g/kg BW/day) of PSB added to the basal ration or the basal ration alone (control group). Feeding PSB attenuated a decrease in fecal pH and increase in fecal lactate concentration compared to the control group without producing a metabolic alkalosis. This suggests that feeding PBS may be effective in attenuating the HGA that can result from feeding high grain intakes to horses.


Borgia L.,University of Minnesota | Valberg S.,University of Minnesota | McCue M.,University of Minnesota | Watts K.,Rocky Research | Pagan J.,Kentucky Equine Research
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition | Year: 2011

Summary: The aim of this study was to determine whether the glycaemic/insulinaemic responses to hay with non-structural carbohydrate (NSC, soluble carbohydrate) of 17% (HC), 10% (MC) or 4% (LC) differs in control horses and whether these responses differ between control and horses with polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM). Five clinically normal control horses and seven PSSM horses, all unfit and of Quarter Horse breeding (age 9.4±3.4years, body condition score range: 4.5-6). A crossover design compared the HC and LC hay, with horses randomly assigned to hay type for 5days, and all horses fed the MC hay during washout, after which the diets were switched. Horses were fed 1.5% BW (as fed) divided into 2 feeding per day, no grain. On morning of the fifth day of each block (seventh day for washout), horses were given 0.5% BW in hay, blood was drawn before and every 30min for 5h after feeding, and the rate of intake was measured. Whole blood glucose and plasma insulin were measured. The intake rate was significantly higher for HC. In control horses, the insulin area under the curve (6891.7±3524.2 HC vs. 1185.4±530.2 LC) was significantly higher than LC. Polysaccharide storage myopathy horses had significantly higher glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to HC vs. LC, however; the magnitude of insulin response was lower and glucose response higher in PSSM vs. control horses. Results suggest that insulin responses can differ significantly with the NSC content of hay. Feeding hay with 17% NSC produces elevations in insulin that could be detrimental for PSSM horses. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.


Trademark
Kentucky Equine Research | Date: 2012-04-23

Horse feed.


Trademark
Kentucky Equine Research | Date: 2012-04-19

Horse feed. Research and development and consultation related thereto in the field of horse nutrition and exercise physiology; scientific and technological services, namely, scientific research and scientific research consulting in the field of horse nutrition and exercise physiology.


Trademark
Kentucky Equine Research | Date: 2012-04-18

Feed supplements for horses; nutritional supplements for horses. Horse feed. Research and development and consultation related thereto in the field of horse nutrition and exercise physiology; scientific and technological services, namely, scientific research and scientific research consulting in the field of horse nutrition and exercise physiology.


Trademark
Kentucky Equine Research | Date: 2012-04-13

Horse feed.


PubMed | Kentucky Equine Research, University of Kentucky, Outcomes Research and Hallway Feeds
Type: | Journal: Veterinary parasitology | Year: 2016

Parasitic helminths of equids are capable of causing ill-thrift, clinical disease, and death. Although young horses are the most susceptible to parasitic disease and are the most intensively treated cohort, deworming regimens are rarely evaluated within this age group. This study objectively evaluated the impact of deworming regimen on fecal egg counts (FECs), growth rates, and body-condition scores in young Thoroughbreds. Forty-eight Thoroughbred foals from three central Kentucky farms were randomly allocated to two treatment groups: an interval dose program receiving bi-monthly rotations of pyrantel pamoate and ivermectin and a daily deworming group receiving daily rations of pyrantel tartrate feed additive throughout the study, oxibendazole at two months of age, and moxidectin treatments at 9.5 and 16.5 months of age. Pre- and post-treatment eggs per gram of feces (EPGs) of Parascaris spp. and strongyle family parasites, gel/paste dewormer efficacies, and monthly weights and body condition scores were collected. Ascarid and strongyle FECs were not significantly different between groups but were significantly influenced by horse age with strongyle counts continually increasing and ascarid counts peaking at 4.5 months of age. Reduced strongyle efficacies of ivermectin and moxidectin were observed on two farms with consistently low pyrantel pamoate efficacies on all three farms. Ivermectin also exhibited reduced ascarid efficacy. Average daily gain did not differ significantly between groups and was only significantly influenced by age, mirroring average daily gain reference data for Kentucky Thoroughbreds born in 2013. Body condition scores also did not differ between groups, remaining in the optimal range (5-6) for the duration of the study. Management practices resulting in growth rates matching the reference data and in optimal body condition scores compensate for the negative impacts of parasitism even in cases of reduced drug efficacy. Performance parameters can provide useful information in cases of suboptimal parasite control.

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