Kennesaw, GA, United States
Kennesaw, GA, United States

Kennesaw State University is a public, coeducational, comprehensive university located in Kennesaw, Georgia, United States, approximately 20 miles north of Atlanta. KSU also holds classes at the Cobb Galleria Centre, Dalton State College, Appalachian Technical College and Dallas. Current enrollment is over 24,600 students. KSU is part of the University System of Georgia. The university has academic programs in business, education, nursing, criminal justice and sports management. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Kennesaw State University | Date: 2016-07-21

A system and method for using the system that permits a severely-ability challenged user to communicate with his or her environment using a brain-controlled interface. In one embodiment, the users functional capability with the system is assessed to enhance candidate optimization for system benefit.


Kidonakis N.,Kennesaw State University
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2015

I calculate the top quark forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron in both the laboratory frame and the tt¯ rest frame. I show that soft-gluon corrections are the dominant contribution to the asymmetry and closely approximate exact results through next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). I present a calculation of the asymmetry including approximate next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order (NLO3) soft-gluon contributions from next-to-next-to-leading-logarithm resummation as well as electroweak corrections. Thus approximate NLO3 (aNLO3) results are obtained, which significantly enhance and improve previous NNLO results. The theoretical aNLO3 result for the top quark forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron in the laboratory frame is (6.8±0.3)%, and in the tt¯ rest frame it is (10.0±0.6)% which is in excellent agreement with recent Tevatron data. © 2015 American Physical Society.


Kidonakis N.,Kennesaw State University
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2010

I present results for top quark production in hadronic collisions at LHC and Tevatron energies. The soft-gluon corrections to the differential cross section are resummed at next-to-next-to-leading-logarithm accuracy via the two-loop soft anomalous dimension matrices. Approximate next-to-next-to-leading- order differential and total cross sections are calculated. Detailed theoretical predictions are shown for the tt̄ cross section and the top quark p T distribution at the Tevatron and the LHC. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Kidonakis N.,Kennesaw State University
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2010

I present results for the two-loop soft anomalous dimensions for associated production of a single top quark with a W boson or a charged Higgs boson. The calculation uses expressions for the massive cusp anomalous dimension, which are presented in different forms, and it allows soft-gluon resummation at next-to-next-to-leading-logarithm (NNLL) accuracy. From the NNLL resummed cross section I derive approximate NNLO cross sections for bg→tW- and bg→tH- at LHC energies of 7, 10, and 14 TeV. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Kidonakis N.,Kennesaw State University
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2011

I present results for the top quark rapidity distribution at Large Hadron Collider and Tevatron energies, including higher-order corrections from threshold resummation. Approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) results are obtained by adding the NNLO soft-gluon corrections at next-to-next-to- leading-logarithm level to the exact next-to-leading-order calculation. Theoretical predictions are shown for the rapidity distribution, including the scale dependence of the distributions. The forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron is also calculated. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Kidonakis N.,Kennesaw State University
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2011

I present the resummation of collinear and soft-gluon corrections to single top quark production in the t channel at next-to-next-to-leading logarithm accuracy using two-loop soft anomalous dimensions. The expansion of the resummed cross section yields approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order cross sections. Numerical results for t-channel single top quark (or single antitop) production at the Tevatron and the LHC are presented, including the dependence of the cross sections on the top quark mass and the uncertainties from scale variation and parton distributions. Combined results for all single top quark production channels are also given. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Kidonakis N.,Kennesaw State University
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2010

I present the next-to-next-to-leading-logarithm (NNLL) resummation of soft and collinear gluon corrections to single top quark production in the s channel. Attaining NNLL accuracy involves the calculation of the two-loop soft anomalous dimension for the partonic subprocesses. Finite-order expansions of the resummed cross section are calculated through next-to-next-to-leading order. Numerical results are presented for s-channel single top quark production at the Tevatron and the LHC, including the dependence of the cross sections on the top quark mass and the uncertainties in the theoretical prediction. The higher-order corrections are significant for energies at both colliders and they decrease the theoretical uncertainty. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS IN CHEM | Award Amount: 240.00K | Year: 2016

In this project funded by the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Sites Program in the Chemistry Division of the National Science Foundation, Professors Mitchell, Linenberger, and colleagues of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Kennesaw State University (KSU) reach out to 2-year and smaller 4-year partner institutions to recruit undergraduate students from institutions that typically do not have the resources to provide a research experience to their chemistry or biochemistry students. The targeted institutions also enroll a diverse population of students. The student researchers work in the lab one-on-one with faculty research mentors and other students on projects designed to be accessible to the undergraduates. The broader impact of the project is to expose a diverse pool of talented students, who have had limited exposure to scientific research, to the excitement of how science is done - working on projects that contribute to the understanding of important problems. All of the students are encouraged to consider a career in science. Society benefits from citizens who are more aware of the process of science and the benefits of scientific research.

The summer research experience at KSU offers the undergraduate research participants (URPs) the opportunity to participate in research that encompasses a broad range of study in chemistry including biochemistry, analytical chemistry, chemical education, inorganic chemistry, materials chemistry, organic chemistry, organometallic chemistry, and physical chemistry. The URPs participate in weekly group meetings with their research mentor and his/her other research students, in workshops on topics ranging from laboratory safety to career opportunities. They also participate in an end-of-the-summer research symposium and in social activities designed to help them assimilate into their research groups. They form an initial network of colleagues and scientific associates that can help them in their future careers.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: STEM + Computing (STEM+C) Part | Award Amount: 294.10K | Year: 2016

Incorporating Computer Programming into Middle School Mathematics Curricula to Enhance Learning for Low Performing Underserved Students is a critical contribution to a national challenge. Improving access to the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) landscape for students across the nation is now a national priority. Expanding access to low performing students is particularly important if the nation is to slow the growing divide between those who have access to the technology sector and those who do not. The project infuses computational thinking and programming into students algebra course experience. Students targeted in the project are 7th-9th grade students in the lowest quartile of mathematics proficiency. Demonstrating a means to not only improve their mathematics performance, but to effectively engage them in basic computing has the potential to be transformative for this particular sub-set of students.

The Algebra Project has developed an effective pedagogical model of algebra instruction over the last 30 years. The project is an experiment in pedagogical innovation. Using MIT App Inventor, students learn basic programming in alignment with core algebraic concepts. The algebra learning modalities are potentially enhanced by greater student engagement and greater development of the logical and analytical thinking necessary to succeed in algebra.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: EVOLUTION OF DEVELOP MECHANISM | Award Amount: 358.80K | Year: 2017

The fins of fishes and the limbs of terrestrial (land living) vertebrates are anatomically distinct: Fins are capped in a series of rays, while limbs terminate in an autopod (hands/feet). These differences support the view that fin rays and autopods are patterned by distinctly separate genes and genetic circuits. If this were true, studies of fin ray growth and regeneration may not be directly transferable to studies of limb birth defects and regeneration research, including in humans. However, preliminary data from this project shows that the same genetic circuits do form the skeletons of both fins and limbs. This project will confirm this common fin/limb building program, first characterizing the activity of key genes in the developing fins of two fish ideally suited to address these questions, the American paddlefish and the small spotted catshark. These results will then guide experiments to test gene function, which will be compared to known data for developing limbs. Outcomes will show that a shared genetic program regulates formation of fins and limbs and demonstrate that fish fins are a powerful research tool for the study of limbs. Part of the success of this program will be the training of new researchers - a diverse group of graduate and undergraduates will bring their talents to this project and contribute to public outreach experiences in the Atlanta area public school system.


The developmental basis of the fin-to-limb transition remains a longstanding question in evolutionary biology. In current models, fins are patterned by distinct proximal and distal developmental modules, generating adult skeletal compartments containing endochondral or dermal elements respectively. Emphasis on skeletal type led to the hypothesis that fin-folds and autopods are not homologous, patterned by different modules, despite similar distal positions. However, new findings raise an intriguing alternative hypothesis: that autopods share a deep regulatory homology with dermal fin rays. This project will build a model for the evolutionary origin of the distal paired appendage gene regulatory network (GRN), expanding on discoveries in two phylogenetically well-positioned vertebrates, the American paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) and the small spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula). To test this model, RNA-seq will be used to build a comprehensive transcriptional map in the fin compartments of paddlefish. These datasets will be compared to existing transcriptomic resources to identify candidate distal appendage GRN genes, which will be tested via pharmacological perturbation assays in paddlefish and complementary gene expression assays in catshark. CRISPR-Cas9 mediated gene knockdowns will test HoxA gene function in paddlefish fins. Together, the outcomes of this project will elucidate key components of the distal appendage GRN, catalyze new research directions that regulate early skeletogenesis, and reinvigorate interest in the use of fins for the study of limb birth defects and regeneration studies. The proposed work will train a diverse group of graduate and undergraduate students, including those recruited through minority participation programs. The PI and students will collaborate on outreach programs to Atlanta area public high schools through virtual access to the PIs lab, classroom visits, and summer intern programs.

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