Kelonia

Grand-Couronne, France
Grand-Couronne, France

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Scott R.,University of Exeter | Scott R.,University of Swansea | Hodgson D.J.,University of Exeter | Witt M.J.,University of Exeter | And 15 more authors.
Global Ecology and Biogeography | Year: 2012

Aim Tracking technologies are often proposed as a method to elucidate the complex migratory life histories of migratory marine vertebrates, allowing spatially explicit threats to be identified and mitigated. We conducted a global analysis of foraging areas of adult green turtles (Chelonia mydas) subject to satellite tracking (n= 145) and the conservation designation of these areas according to International Union for Conservation of Nature criteria. Location The green turtle has a largely circumtropical distribution, with adults migrating up to thousands of kilometres between nesting beaches and foraging areas, typically in neritic seagrass or algal beds. Methods We undertook an assessment of satellite tracking projects that followed the movements of green turtles in tropical and subtropical habitats. This approach was facilitated by the use of the Satellite Tracking and Analysis Tool (http://www.seaturtle.org) and the integration of publicly available data on Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Results We show that turtles aggregate in designated MPAs far more than would be expected by chance when considered globally (35% of all turtles were located within MPAs) or separately by ocean basin (Atlantic 67%, Indian 34%, Mediterranean 19%, Pacific 16%). Furthermore, we show that the size, level of protection and time of establishment of MPAs affects the likelihood of MPAs containing foraging turtles, highlighting the importance of large, well-established reserves. Main conclusions Our findings constitute compelling evidence of the world-wide effectiveness of extant MPAs in circumscribing important foraging habitats for a marine megavertebrate. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Ballorain K.,University of Strasbourg | Ballorain K.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Ballorain K.,University of Reunion Island | Ciccione S.,KELONIA | And 6 more authors.
Marine Biology | Year: 2010

We investigated the habitat use in green turtles exploiting a 13-ha multispecific seagrass meadow at Mayotte Island, south-western Indian Ocean. A phyto-ecological survey shows the occurrence of eight seagrass species, dominated by Halodule uninervis and Syringodium isoetifolium, distributed according to four distinct seagrass communities along the depth gradient. Direct underwater censuses show that green turtles occurred all over the meadow. Yet when community relative surface area was taken into account green turtles preferentially frequented the most seaward, biomass-richer S. isoetifolium-dominated community, suggesting that green turtles compensate for their intrinsically nutrient-poor herbivorous diet. Additionally, smaller (<80 cm standard curved carapace length, SCCL) individuals also preferentially occurred in the most shoreward H. univervis-dominated community where no larger (>80 cm SCCL) individuals were sighted, suggesting habitat use is indicative of diet selection and may reflect size-specific food requirements and physiology. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.


Dalleau M.,University of Reunion Island | Dalleau M.,Center dEcologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive | Dalleau M.,French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea | Ciccione S.,Kelonia | And 5 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Changes in phenology, the timing of seasonal activities, are among the most frequently observed responses to environmental disturbances and in marine species are known to occur in response to climate changes that directly affects ocean temperature, biogeochemical composition and sea level. We examined nesting seasonality data from long-term studies at 8 green turtle (Chelonia mydas) rookeries that include 21 specific nesting sites in the South-West Indian Ocean (SWIO). We demonstrated that temperature drives patterns of nesting seasonality at the regional scale. We found a significant correlation between mean annual Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and dates of peak nesting with rookeries exposed to higher SST having a delayed nesting peak. This supports the hypothesis that temperature is the main factor determining peak nesting dates. We also demonstrated a spatial synchrony in nesting activity amongst multiple rookeries in the northern part of the SWIO (Aldabra, Glorieuses, Mohéli, Mayotte) but not with the eastern and southern rookeries (Europa, Tromelin), differences which could be attributed to females with sharply different adult foraging conditions. However, we did not detect a temporal trend in the nesting peak date over the study period or an inter-annual relation between nesting peak date and SST. The findings of our study provide a better understanding of the processes that drive marine species phenology. The findings will also help to predict their ability to cope with climate change and other environmental perturbations. Despite demonstrating this spatial shift in nesting phenology, no trend in the alteration of nesting dates over more than 20 years was found. © 2012 Dalleau et al.


Dalleau M.,University of Reunion Island | Dalleau M.,Center dEcologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive | Dalleau M.,French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea | Benhamou S.,Center dEcologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive | And 3 more authors.
Marine Biology | Year: 2014

While our understanding of the early oceanic developmental stage of sea turtles has improved markedly over recent decades, the spatial context for this life history stage remains unknown for Indian Ocean loggerhead turtle populations. To address this gap in our knowledge, 18 juvenile loggerheads were satellite tracked from Reunion Island (21.2°S, 55.3°E) between 2007 and 2011. Nine turtles swam north toward Oman (20.5°N, 58.8°E), where one of the world's largest rookeries of loggerheads is located. Three individuals traveled south toward South Africa and Madagascar, countries that also host loggerhead nesting grounds. Fourteen of the transmitters relayed diving profiles. A dichotomy between diurnal and nocturnal diving behavior was observed with a larger number of shorter dives occurring during the day. Diving behavior also differed according to movement behavior as individuals spent more time in subsurface waters (between 10 and 20 m) during transit phases. The study provides an understanding of the oceanic movement behavior of juvenile loggerheads in the Indian Ocean that suggests the existence of an atypical trans-equatorial developmental cycle for the species at the ocean basin scale in the Indian Ocean. These results address a significant gap in the understanding of loggerhead oceanic movements and may help with the conservation of the species. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Notice is hereby given to Aktia Bank Plc shareholders of the Annual General Meeting, to be held on Wednesday, 5 April 2017 at 4.00 pm at the Old Student House, address Mannerheimintie 3, Helsinki. Persons who have registered their intention to attend will be welcomed from 3.00 pm onwards and voting sheets will be distributed. A. Matters on the agenda of the Annual General Meeting At the Annual General Meeting, the following matters will be considered: 1. Opening of the meeting 2. Calling the meeting to order 3. Election of persons to scrutinize the minutes and to supervise the counting of votes 4.  Recording the legality of the meeting 5. Recording the attendance at the meeting and adoption of the list of votes 6. Presentation of the financial statements, consolidated financial statements, report by the Board of Directors, Auditor’s report and the statement by the Board of Supervisors for 2016 7. Adoption of the financial statements and the consolidated financial statements 8. Resolution on the use of the profit indicated in the balance sheet and the payment of dividend For the financial year 2016, the Board of Directors proposes that a dividend of EUR 0.60 per share shall be paid, of which EUR 0.08 are attributable to one-time gains during the year. Shareholders entitled to dividend are those who are registered in the register of shareholders of the company maintained by Euroclear Finland Ltd on the record date 07/04/2017. The Board of Directors proposes that the dividend shall be paid out on 21/04/2017 in accordance with the rules of Euroclear Finland Ltd. 9. Resolution on discharging the members of the Board of Supervisors and the Board of Directors, the CEO and his deputy from liability 10. Resolution on remuneration for the members of the Board of Supervisors The Nomination Committee proposes the remuneration for members of the Supervisory Board to remain unchanged from the previous year, and amount to: The Nomination Committee proposes that 40% of the annual remuneration (gross amount) shall be paid to the members in the form of Aktia Bank Plc series A shares (2016: 35%). In addition, the Nomination Committee proposes a remuneration of EUR 500 per attended meeting. However, the chair of the Presiding Officers of the Board of Supervisors is proposed to receive a remuneration of EUR 1,000 per meeting of the Presiding Officers. Compensation for travelling and accommodation expenses as well as a daily allowance is proposed to be paid in line with the Tax Administration guidelines. The Nomination Committee proposes that a reasonable remuneration shall be paid to the auditor according the invoice. 12. Determination of the number of members on the Board of Supervisors The Nomination Committee proposes that the number of members of the Board of Supervisors shall be decreased to 26 (2016: 28). 13. Determination of the number of auditors The Nomination Committee proposes that the number of auditors shall be one (1). 14. Election of members of the Board of Supervisors The Nomination Committee proposes that members of the Board of Supervisors Christina Gestrin, Patrik Lerche, Håkan Fagerström, Peter Simberg, Solveig Söderback and Peter Karlgren, who are all due to step down at the Annual General Meeting 2017, shall be re-elected to f the Board of Supervisors. The nomination committee proposes that Nina Wilkman, LL.M., and Mats Löfström, Member of Parliament, shall be elected as new members. The new candidates are presented at the end of the summons. All candidates are proposed to be elected for a term of office in accordance with Article 8 in the Articles of Association of the company, beginning when the Annual General Meeting 2017 is closed and continuing until the Annual General Meeting 2020 has concluded, or as long as Aktia Bank plc has a Board of Supervisors. The Nomination Committee proposes, based on the recommendation from the Board of Directors’ audit committee, that the KPMG Oy Ab, a firm of authorised public accountants, would be elected as auditor, with Jari Härmälä, M.Sc. (Econ.), APA, as auditor-in-charge. 16. Authorising the Board of Directors to decide on one or more issues of shares or specific rights referred to in Chapter 10 of the Limited Liability Companies Act that grant entitlement to shares. The Board of Directors proposes that the Annual General Meeting authorises the Board of Directors to issue shares, or specific rights entitling to shares as referred to in Chapter 10 of the Limited Liability Companies Act, as follows: The number of shares to be issued in accordance with this authorisation is 6,658,000, corresponding to approximately 10% of all shares in the company. The Board of Directors is authorised to decide on all terms for issues of shares and issues of specific rights entitling to shares. The authorisation is attributable to the issue of new shares. Issue of shares or specific rights entitling to shares can be carried out in deviation from shareholders' pre-emptive subscription right to company’s shares (directed share issue). Of the total number of shares issued supported by the authorisation, no more than one third may be series R shares. The Board of Directors has the right to use this authorisation to strengthen the company's capital base, for the company's share-based incentive scheme and/or for company acquisitions. The authorisation is effective 18 months from the decision by the Annual General Meeting and recalls the authorisation to issue shares given by the Annual General Meeting 12/04/2016. 17. Authorising the Board of Directors to decide on the acquisition of company’s own shares The Board of Directors proposes that the Annual General Meeting authorizes the Board of Directors to decide on acquisition of 200,000 series A shares at a maximum, approximately corresponding to 0.4% of the total number of series A shares in the company. The own shares may be acquires in one or several lots using the unrestricted equity of the company. The own shares may be acquired in public trading at a price formed in public trading on the date of the acquisition or otherwise at a price prevailing on the market. Own shares may be acquired in a proportion other than that of the shares held by the shareholders in other relations than shareholders' holdings of shares (directed acquisition). The company's own shares may be acquired to be used in the company's share-based incentive scheme and/or the remuneration of members of the company's administrative bodies, for further transfer or retention. The Board of Directors is authorised to decide on all other terms concerning acquisition of the company's own shares. The authorisation is effective 18 months from the decision by the Annual General Meeting and recalls the authorisation to purchase own shares given by the Annual General Meeting 12/04/2016. 18. Authorising the Board of Directors to decide to divest company’s own shares The Board of Directors proposes that the Annual General Meeting authorizes the Board of Directors to decide on divesting own shares held by the company, as follows: Based on the authorisation, a maximum of 300,000 series A shares may be divested. The Board of Directors is authorised to decide on all other terms concerning divestment of the company's own shares. The divestment of the company's own shares can be carried out in deviation from the shareholders’ pre-emptive subscription right to company’s shares (directed share issue), e.g. to implement the company's incentive programme and remuneration. The authorisation is effective 18 months from the decision by the Annual General Meeting and recalls the authorisation to divest own shares given by the Annual General Meeting 12/04/2016. The proposals for the decisions on the matters on the agenda of the Annual General Meeting as well as this notice are available on Aktia Bank Plc’s website www.aktia.com. Aktia Bank Plc’s annual report, encompassing the company’s financial statements, the report by the Board of Directors, the auditor’s report plus the Board of Supervisors’ statement on the accounts, the report by the Board of Directors and the auditor’s report, will be available on the website mentioned above by 15/03/2017 at the latest. Copies of the above-mentioned documents will be sent to shareholders on request. Above-mentioned documents will also be available at the Annual General Meeting. The minutes of the Annual General Meeting will be available on the website mentioned above by 19/04/2017 at the latest. C. Instructions for the participants in the Annual General Meeting Each shareholder, who is registred on in the company’s register of shareholders maintained by Euroclear Finland Ab as at 24/03/2017, has the right to participate in the Annual General Meeting. Shareholders whose shares a registered to their personal Finnish book-entry account are registered in the company’s register of shareholders. Shareholders who are registered in the company's register of shareholders and who wish to participate in the Annual General Meeting must register their intention to attend by 4.00 pm on 30/03/2017 at the latest. Participants can register for the Annual General Meeting: a) through the company’s website www.aktia.com b) by telephone at +358 800 0 2474 (8.30 am-4.30 pm on weekdays) d) in writing to Aktia Bank plc, Group Legal, P.O. Box 207, 00101 Helsinki. For registration purposes, the shareholder is requested to give his/her name and personal identification code or business ID, address, telephone number as well as the name and personal identification code of any representative. The personal details that shareholders give to Aktia Bank Plc will only be used for purposes associated with the Annual General Meeting and preparing the relevant registrations. 2. Owners of nominee registered shares Owners of nominee registered shares have the right to attend the Annual General Meeting with the shares he/she would have be entitled to have entered in the company's register of shareholders, maintained by Euroclear Finland Ltd, on the record date of the Annual General Meeting 24/03/2017. Attendance also requires that the shareholder has been entered into the company's temporary register of shareholders, maintained by Euroclear Finland Ltd, based on these shares on 31/03/2017 at 10 am at the latest. For the nominee registered shares, this is also considered as registration to the Annual General Meeting. Owners of shares registered in the name of a trustee shall in good time request their asset manager for the necessary instructions on being entered into the temporary register of shareholders, the granting of powers of attorney and registration for the Annual General Meeting. The trustee's account management organisation requests owners of shares registered in the name of a trustee, who wish to attend the Annual General Meeting, to be entered into the company’s temporary register of shareholders at the latest at the above mentioned time. Shareholders may participate in the Annual General Meeting and exercise their rights through a representative. The shareholder’s representative shall produce a dated power of attorney or demonstrate their right to represent the shareholder in some other reliable way. If a shareholder is represented by more than one representative at the general meeting, each of which represent the shares held by the shareholder in different book-entry accounts, it must be indicated, at the time of registration, which of the shareholder's shares each representative represents. Representatives should submit their powers of attorney to the company before the meeting at the following address: Aktia Bank plc/Group Legal, PO Box 207, 00101 Helsinki, e-mail koncernjuridik@aktia.fi, or to the fax number +358 10 247 6568. Pursuant to chapter 5, section 25 of the Limited Liability Companies Act, shareholders present at the Annual General Meeting have the right to request information with respect to the matters to be considered at the meeting. On the day this notice of the Annual General Meeting was drawn up, namely 27/02/2017, the total number of shares in Aktia Bank Plc is 66,578,811: 46,706,723 series A shares and 19,872,088 series R shares. The total number of votes is 444,148,483. During any voting, the 136,356 series A shares and 6,658 series R shares, giving entitlement to a total of 269,516 votes, which the company owns itself, will not be taken into account. Further, series A shares, representing 767,551 votes, constitute shares distributed as compensation for the merger to owners of Veritas Mutual Non-Life Insurance Company in 2009, that have not yet been registered on any book-entry account and can therefore not be taken into account in any voting. For more information, please contact: Director Mia Bengts, HR and Group Legal, tel. +358 10 247 6348   Presentation of proposed new members to the Board of Supervisors Nina Wilkman (b. 1958) - Attorney-at-Law, LL.M., postgraduate student, doctoral programme - Member of the delegation, Stiftelsen Tre Smeder - Member of the Board of Supervisors, Ab Kelonia Oy - Lives in Helsinki Mats Löfström (b. 1983) - Member of Parliament, M.Soc.Sc. - Member of the Board, Stiftelsen Tre Smeder - Supervisory Board, Finnish National Opera - Chair, Svensk Utveckling r.f. - Member of the Delegation, Östersjöfonden - 2nd Vice Chair, The Swedish Parliamentary Group - Vice Chair, Ålands vänner i Helsingfors r.f. - Lives in Helsinki


Jean C.,Kelonia | Ciccione S.,Kelonia | Ballorain K.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Ballorain K.,University of Reunion Island | And 2 more authors.
ORYX | Year: 2010

Reunion Island in the south-west Indian Ocean once had significant nesting populations of marine turtles but they declined rapidly after human colonization. In 1996, after regular sightings of turtles offshore, an aerial survey programme was initiated to monitor the occurrence of marine turtles and their distribution along the west coast of the island. Between 1998 and 2008, along a 30-km coastline transect between Saint Leu and Saint Paul, a total of 1,845 marine turtle sightings were recorded during 146 flights with an ultralight aircraft. The mean number of turtle sightings per survey increased significantly between 1998 and 2008, and a variety of sizes were recorded throughout the year. Marine turtles were found over coral reef zones and on the outer reef slopes. Spatial distribution may be linked to the topography and substrate of the bottom, which determine the availability of food and shelter. The marine protected area located off Saint Paul seems to have benefited marine turtles as they frequent this area more than other regions on the west coast. These results are encouraging for local organizations working for the conservation of marine turtles on Reunion Island. Copyright © 2010 Fauna & Flora International.


Benhamou S.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Sudre J.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Bourjea J.,French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea | Ciccione S.,Kelonia | And 2 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Background: Laboratory and field experiments have provided evidence that sea turtles use geomagnetic cues to navigate in the open sea. For instance, green turtles (Chelonia mydas) displaced 100 km away from their nesting site were impaired in returning home when carrying a strong magnet glued on the head. However, the actual role of geomagnetic cues remains unclear, since magnetically treated green turtles can perform large scale (>2000 km) post-nesting migrations no differently from controls. Methodology/Principal Findings: In the present homing experiment, 24 green turtles were displaced 200 km away from their nesting site on an oceanic island, and tracked, for the first time in this type of experiment, with Global Positioning System (GPS), which is able to provide much more frequent and accurate locations than previously used tracking methods. Eight turtles were magnetically treated for 24-48 h on the nesting beach prior to displacement, and another eight turtles had a magnet glued on the head at the release site. The last eight turtles were used as controls. Detailed analyses of water masses-related (i.e., current-corrected) homing paths showed that magnetically treated turtles were able to navigate toward their nesting site as efficiently as controls, but those carrying magnets were significantly impaired once they arrived within 50 km of home. Conclusions/Significance: While green turtles do not seem to need geomagnetic cues to navigate far from the goal, these cues become necessary when turtles get closer to home. As the very last part of the homing trip (within a few kilometers of home) likely depends on non-magnetic cues, our results suggest that magnetic cues play a key role in sea turtle navigation at an intermediate scale by bridging the gap between large and small scale navigational processes, which both appear to depend on non-magnetic cues. © 2011 Benhamou et al.


Carpentier A.S.,Kelonia | Jean C.,Kelonia | Barret M.,Kelonia | Chassagneux A.,Kelonia | Ciccione S.,Kelonia
Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology | Year: 2016

Photographic identification (photo-ID) has been increasingly used as a reliable tool to track individuals over time, which provides essential knowledge on a species' population dynamics. For photo-ID to work, natural markings must be individual-specific and stable over time. In sea turtle research, the use of facial scale patterns has been proposed and tested as a reliable means for individual recognition. Nevertheless, as sea turtles are migratory and long-lived individuals, the stability of those patterns over long periods of time is yet to be confirmed to validate this method. Stability of facial scale patterns was evaluated on green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, sighted and photographed in coastal waters of Reunion Island (21°06 S, 55°36 E) or reared in captivity. From 53 free-ranging individuals previously identified, 90 head profiles were selected based on the photographic quality and the distinctiveness of facial scale patterns. The time interval between two sightings of a same individual ranged from 2 (738d) to 11. years (3954d). Additionally, facial scale patterns of captive green turtles from two different age groups were compared: (1) from adult-sized individuals reared in captivity (n=. 13) and (2) from hatchlings and then at later developmental stages (until 1800d) to assess the stability of facial scale patterns throughout early juvenile development (n=. 16). In both the free-ranging and captive-reared groups, there were no significant changes in facial scale patterns over time. Conversely, changes in pigmentation were observed in free-ranging turtles at successive sightings and in captive-reared turtles at different developmental stages. These results on the stability of facial scale patterns over time, combined with previous findings on the uniqueness of patterns between individual green turtles, validate the method of using facial scale patterns as a long-term identification tool for green turtles. Nonetheless, the variability of pigmentation patterns should be kept in mind when using photo-identification on sea turtle species. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Enstipp M.R.,CNRS Hubert Curien Multi-disciplinary Institute | Ballorain K.,CNRS Hubert Curien Multi-disciplinary Institute | Ciccione S.,Kelonia | Narazaki T.,University of Tokyo | And 2 more authors.
Functional Ecology | Year: 2016

Measuring the energy requirements of animals under natural conditions and determining how acquired energy is allocated to specific activities is a central theme in ecophysiology. Turtle reproductive output is fundamentally linked with their energy balance so a detailed understanding of marine turtle energy requirements during the different phases of their life cycle at sea is essential for their conservation. We used the non-invasive accelerometry technique to investigate the activity patterns and energy expenditure (EE) of adult green turtles (Chelonia mydas) foraging year-round at a seagrass meadow in Mayotte (n = 13) and during simulated oceanic migration (displacement from the nesting beach) off Mohéli (n = 1), in the south-western Indian Ocean. At the foraging site, turtles divided their days between foraging benthically on the shallow seagrass meadow during daylight hours and resting at greater depth on the inner side of the reef slope at night. Estimated oxygen consumption rates (sV˙O2) and daily energy expenditures (DEE) at the foraging site were low (sV˙O2 during the day was 1·6 and 1·9 times the respective resting rate at night during the austral summer and winter, respectively), which is consistent with the requirement to build up substantial energy reserves at the foraging site, to sustain the energy-demanding breeding migration and reproduction. Dive duration (but not dive depth) at the foraging site shifted significantly with season (dive duration increased with declining water temperatures, Tw), while overall activity levels remained unchanged. In parallel with a significant seasonal decline in Tw (from 28·9 ± 0·1 °C to 25·3 ± 0·4 °C), there was a moderate (˜19%) but significant decline in DEE of turtles during the austral winter (901 ± 111 kJ day-1), when compared with the austral summer (1117 ± 66 kJ day-1). By contrast, the turtle moved continuously during simulated oceanic migration, conducting short/shallow dives in the day, which (predominately at night) were interspersed with longer and deeper 'pelagic' dives. Estimated oxygen consumption rates during a simulated migration (1·25 ± 0·16 mL O2 min-1 kg-0·83) were found to be significantly increased over the foraging condition, equal to ˜3 times the resting rate at night (0·42 ± 0·02 mL O2 min-1 kg-0·83), and daily energy expenditure amounted to 2327 ± 292 kJ day-1, underlining the tremendous energetic effort associated with breeding migration. Our study indicates that the accelerometry technique provides a new and promising opportunity to study marine turtle energy relations in great detail and under natural conditions. © 2016 British Ecological Society.


Bourjea J.,French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea | Clermont S.,French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea | Clermont S.,Agro ParisTech | Delgado A.,Spanish Institute of Oceanography | And 4 more authors.
Biological Conservation | Year: 2014

Bycatch of endangered marine turtles is a growing issue for the management of all fisheries, including the oceanic purse-seine fishery. The aim of this study was to assess the spatial and temporal variation in bycatch rates of these species in the entire European purse-seine fishery operating in the Atlantic and Indian oceans. The study was based on data collected through observer programs from 1995 to 2011. During that period, a total of 15 913 fishing sets were observed, including 6 515 on Drifting Fish Aggregating Devices (DFADs) and 9 398 on free swimming schools, representing a global coverage of 10.3% and 5.1% of the total fishing activity in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, respectively. Moreover, from 2003 to 2011, 14 124 specific observations were carried out on DFADs to check turtle entanglement in the net covering DFADs. We found that the purse-seine fishery has a very low impact on marine turtles. We estimated that the annual number of individuals incidentally captured was 218 (SD = 150) and 250 (SD = 157) in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, respectively, with more than 75% being released alive. The present study also investigated the impact of DFADs; which is considered a key conservation issue for this fishery. Drifting objects may play a key role in aggregating juveniles of marine turtles, implying the need for improving their construction to avoid entanglement (e.g. avoiding nets in the structure); however, based on our study it is not the main source of incidental captures of marine turtles in this fishery. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

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