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Issanova G.,Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography | Issanova G.,Uu Uspanov Kazakh Research Institute Of Soil Science And Agrochemistry | Issanova G.,Al-Farabi Kazakh National University | Abuduwaili J.,Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the Geological Society of India | Year: 2015

Dust/sand storm is a common phenomenon in arid and semi-arid regions of Kazakhstan, especially in its southern parts, where areas are covered by a great variety of deserts and are a powerful source of mineral and salt aerosols. We considered the long-term meteorological data and satellite images on dust storms recurrence and their regional division in Kazakhstan. On the basis of generalization and analyses of the numerous cartographic materials, meteorological observations and satellite images, we identified seats of the powerful sources of dust/sand/salt storms. We found areas in Kazakhstan with the highest frequency of dust storms. These are Pre-Aral Karakum and Aralkum deserts; Kyzylkum and Moiynkum deserts; Ryn sands (northern Caspian plain); and southern Pre-Balkhash deserts. The most active source of dust storms is located in sandy deserts or in areas, which have suffered from human activity. Dust storms have a great negative impact on soil conditions and they are particularly dangerous for the environment. © 2015, Geological Society of India. Source


Gulnura I.,Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography | Abuduwaili J.,Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography | Oleg S.,Kazakh Research Institute of Ecology and Climate
Arabian Journal of Geosciences | Year: 2013

Deflation processes are important in arid environments such as deserts. The deserts of Kazakhstan mostly cover lowlands and extend from the eastern coast of the Caspian Sea to the piedmonts of the Tien-Shan Mountain. Desert areas are also major source areas of dust/sand storm activities. We considered deflation processes in the southern Pre-Balkhash deserts. In Kazakhstan, desertification processes due to wind erosion in the form of dust/sand storms were observed in semi-desert and desert landscapes. During analysis of numerous long-term meteorological data and cartographic materials, we revealed the sand movement directions which allow prediction of future potential sand movement patterns or processes in southern Pre-Balkhash deserts. The Taukum, Moiynkum deserts, Ili river deltas and valleys, and southern coastal of Lake Balkhash are most prone to dust/sand storms. The most frequent storms were observed in the Bakanas weather station (Ile river valley). Sand/dust transport occurs mainly in the east, south-east north-east direction in the southern Pre-Balkhash deserts. The high amount of sand transportation was observed at the Kuigan weather station; low amounts were encountered at the Naimansuiek weather station. The amount of airborne sand/dust varies in accordance with the general and local meteorological features, the complexity of relief forms, soil conditions and properties, lithology, and various contributions of the human activities. Thus, our study on deflation processes in the southern Pre-Balkhash deserts has great importance towards aiding in the prediction and monitoring of dust/sand storms and movement patterns. © 2013, Saudi Society for Geosciences. Source


Issanova G.,Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography | Issanova G.,Uu Uspanov Kazakh Research Institute Of Soil Science And Agrochemistry | Issanova G.,Al-Farabi Kazakh National University | Abuduwaili J.,Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology | Year: 2015

The aeolian transport of dust, sand and salt is a common process in southern Kazakhstan, as well as in the Aral Sea region. Anthropogenic desertification and the desiccation of the Aral Sea have occurred in the basin since 1960. The whole area of the desiccated seafloor is now a new salt desert, and it became an active source of dust, sand or salt storms. The newly formed Aralkum desert was found to be the dominant source of aeolian sand, dust and salt aerosols. Additionally, the most frequent storms were observed in Pre-Aral Karakum and Kyzylkum deserts, where these storms occurred from 40 to 110 days average per year. Aeolian sands and dusts flowed mainly from eastern and north-eastern to the western and south-western directions. The highest amount of sand transportation was observed at the Aral Sea meteorological station. The lowest amount was at the Kazaly meteorological station. Furthermore, transported sand mass has increased at this station during last decade. Most meteorological stations found three maximums of sand and dust transportation, namely in 1966–1970, 1984–1986, and 2000–2002, that is, three periods, like a cycle about every 15 years. Overall, most of the meteorological stations showed the slight decrease in sand and dust transportation that may be explained by fixing sand control measures and other activities which have been done against deflation processes in the region. © 2015, Islamic Azad University (IAU). Source


Cherednichenko V.S.,Al-Farabi Kazakh National University | Cherednichenko A.V.,Kazakh Research Institute of Ecology and Climate | Nyssanbaeva A.S.,Al-Farabi Kazakh National University | Zhumalipov A.R.,Al-Farabi Kazakh National University | Madibekov A.S.,Institute of Geography Kazakhstan
Advances in Environmental Biology | Year: 2014

The distribution of microelements in the snow cover in northern Kazakhstan has been studied. Also, using the data from previous studies the spatial distribution of microelements for the entire territory of Kazakhstan has been mapped. The areas of local pollution in snow cover in major industrial centers Chromtau, Zhezkazgan, Balkhash, and Shymkent have been identified. © 2014 AENSI Publisher All rights reserved. Source

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