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Greenfield D.W.,California Academy of Sciences | Greenfield D.W.,Hawaii Pacific University | Suzuki T.,Kawanishi midoridai Senior High School
Zootaxa | Year: 2012

A species commonly identified as Eviota pellucida in the literature has been misidentified and is in fact an undescribed species, described here as E. atriventris. Eviota pellucida is known only from the Gilbert and Marshall Islands, Ponape, Mariana Islands, and the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Eviota atriventris is known from the Ryukyu Islands, Philippine Islands, Palau Islands, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, New Caledonia, and the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Eviota atriventris differs from E. pellucida in both preserved and live coloration and in pectoral-fin ray counts. © 2012 Magnolia Press.


Suzuki T.,Kawanishi midoridai Senior High School | Greenfield D.W.,California Academy of Sciences | Greenfield D.W.,Hawaii Pacific University | Motomura H.,Kagoshima University
Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Two new species of Eviota from Yoron Island, the Ryukyu Islands, Japan, are described. Both species belong to the ce-phalic sensory-canal pore system pattern 2 (lacking only the H [IT] pore); have some pectoral-fin rays branched; have a dorsal/anal-fin formula of 9/8; no dark spot over the ural centrum; no prominent distinct dark spots on the pectoral-fin base; no postocular spots; and no strong dark spots on the caudal fin. The species share the most characters with E. afelei, E. bimaculata and E. punctulata, but differ from Eviota afelei and E. punctulata by having two versus three dark marks over the anal-fin base, and from Eviota bimaculata by lacking the two dark, prominent occipital spots present in that spe-cies. Both species differ from all other described species of Eviota in fresh coloration. Eviota flavipinnata has bright gold-en-yellow dorsal fins and an orange anal fin, and a fifth pelvic-fin ray that is 12% the length of the fourth ray. Eviota rubrimaculata has clear dorsal fins with red spots, large red spots on the body, and lacks the fifth pelvic-fin ray. Copyright © 2015 Magnolia Press.


Suzuki T.,Kawanishi midoridai Senior High School | Chen I.-S.,National Taiwan Ocean University
Journal of Marine Science and Technology (Taiwan) | Year: 2013

Two new gobiid species of Vanderhorstia Smith, 1959 which have been recently collected from Japanese waters. Both new species are distributed in marine coral reef habitats off the Ryukyus, Japan. Vanderhorstia cyanolineata sp. nov. can be well distinguished from congeners by the following unique combination of features: (1) fin ray counts: second dorsal fin rays I/12, anal fin rays I/12; pectoral fin rays 18-19; (2) fin shape: low first dorsal fin with about equal 3rd to 5th spinous rays, caudal fin large and middle rays as sword-like projection; (3) scales: LR 50-52; TR 18; and (4) its own specific colouration mentioned below. Vanderhorstia fulvopelvis sp. nov. can be well distinguished from congeners by the following unique combination of features: (1) fin ray counts: second dorsal fin rays I/12, anal fin rays I/12; pectoral fin rays 17; (2) fin shape:D1 in lacking any filamentous ray; C large with larger upper lobe forming as pointed tip; (3) scales: LR 46-47; TR 16; and (4) their own specific colouration. The diagnosis, formal descriptions and color images of specimens as well as underwater photo records will be provided in this paper.


Suzuki T.,Kawanishi midoridai Senior High School | Chen I.-S.,National Taiwan Ocean University | Senou H.,Kanagawa Prefectural Museum of Natural History
Journal of Marine Science and Technology | Year: 2011

A new freshwater goby, Rhinogobius ogasawaraensis was collected from streams of the Bonin Islands (Ogasawara Group), Japan. The species can be distinguished from all congeneric species by the following combination of characters: (1) meristic features: second dorsal fin rays I, 8-9; pectoral fin rays 18-20; predorsal scales 7-16; longitudinal scale rows usually 32-34; vertebral count 26; and (2) specific colouration: check with some red spots, nape with several longitudinal dark stripes, upper part of pectoral fin base with a horizontal deep brown bar, intermittent dark dotted rows along middle axis of body, no saddle shaped patch of dark dots on dorsal side of body, ventral side of body yellowish white, caudal fin with some dark dotted rows on middle region and the base with a pair of dark brown bars which vertically to each other. The ripe oocyte diameter of this new species suggests that it belongs to a member of typical amphidromous species.


Shibukawa K.,Nagao Natural Environment Foundation | Suzuki T.,Kawanishi midoridai Senior High School | Senou H.,Kanagawa Prefectural Museum of Natural History
Zootaxa | Year: 2012

The Indo-West Pacific gobiid fish genus Lotilia, symbiotically associated with alpheid shrimps, is reviewed. The genus comprises two species, viz. L. graciliosa Klausewitz, 1960 and L. klausewitzi sp. nov., the latter of which is described herein based on 11 specimens (including seven type specimens) from Japan, Australia and the Bismark Archipelago. Lotilia klausewitzi, previously misidentified as L. graciliosa in the West Pacific, is readily distinguished from L. graciliosa by having the following features, in addition to some minor differences in the sensory-papillae configuration on the cheek: cephalic sensory canals and associated pores present (vs. absent in L. graciliosa); 7+6=13 branched caudal-fin rays (vs. 7+7=14); pale area on dorsum from snout to dorsoanterior part of body relatively long, extending posteriorly to, or beyond, base of fifth spine of first dorsal fin (vs. extending posteriorly to around base of third or fourth spine); a faint, relatively small dark grayish brown spot at center of first dorsal fin behind third or fourth spine, and its paler margin usually absent or obscure (vs. conspicuous ocellated black spot with vivid pale margin at center of first dorsal fin, extending anteriorly beyond third spine); and a submarginal row of black spots on caudal fin (vs. absent). Geographic records based on the specimens examined and underwater photographs indicate that L. graciliosa appears to be restricted to the Red Sea and its adjacent areas, whereas L. klausewitzi is widely found in the West Pacific. Lotilia is re-diagnosed, and L. graciliosa is re-described based on five specimens including the holotype. Copyright © 2012, Magnolia Press.

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